• Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2014

      Seriously Dangerous Religion

      What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters

      by Iain Provan

      The Old Testament is often maligned as an outmoded and even dangerous text. Best-selling authors like Richard Dawkins, Karen Armstrong, and Derrick Jensen are prime examples of those who find the Old Testament to be problematic to modern sensibilities. Iain Provan counters that such easy and popular readings misunderstand the Old Testament. He opposes modern misconceptions of the Old Testament by addressing ten fundamental questions that the biblical text should--and according to Provan does--answer: questions such as "Who is God?" and "Why do evil and suffering mark the world?" By focusing on Genesis and drawing on other Old Testament and extra-biblical sources, Seriously Dangerous Religion constructs a more plausible reading. As it turns out, Provan argues, the Old Testament is far more dangerous than modern critics even suppose. Its dangers are the bold claims it makes upon its readers. ; 1 Of Mice, and Men, and HobbitsStories, Art, and Life2 The Up Quark, the Down Quark, and Other Cool Stuff What Is the World?3 Slow to Anger, Abounding in Love, and (Thankfully) Jealous Who Is God?4 Of Humus and Humanity Who Are Man and Woman?5 It Isn't Natural Why Do Evil and Suffering Mark the World?6 On Living in a Blighted World What Am I to Do about Evil and Suffering?7 Even the Stork Knows That How Am I to Relate to God?8 Love All, Trust a Few, Do Wrong to None How Am I to Relate to My Neighbor?9 On Keeping the Earth How Am I to Relate to the Rest of Creation?10 I Saw the New Jerusalem Which Society Should I Be Helping to Build?11 A Bird Perched in the Soul What Am I to Hope For?12 Further Up and Further In New Dimensions in the Old Story13 On the Judicious Closing of the Mind The Question of Truth14 Risk Assessment Is the Story Dangerous?Postscript: Biblical Faith for a New AgeNotesBibliographyScripture IndexIndex of AuthorsSubject Index

    • Christian theology
      June 2016

      Echoes of Scripture in the Gospels

      by Richard B. Hays

      The claim that the events of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection took place "according to the Scriptures" stands at the heart of the New Testament’s message. All four canonical Gospels declare that the Torah and the Prophets and the Psalms mysteriously prefigure Jesus. The author of the Fourth Gospel states this claim succinctly: in his narrative, Jesus declares, "If you believed Moses, you would believe me, for he wrote about me" (John 5:46). Yet modern historical criticism characteristically judges that the New Testament’s christological readings of Israel’s Scripture misrepresent the original sense of the texts; this judgment forces fundamental questions to be asked: Why do the Gospel writers read the Scriptures in such surprising ways? Are their readings intelligible as coherent or persuasive interpretations of the Scriptures? Does Christian faith require the illegitimate theft of someone else’s sacred texts? Echoes of Scripture in the Gospels answers these questions. Richard B. Hays chronicles the dramatically different ways the four Gospel writers interpreted Israel’s Scripture and reveals that their readings were as complementary as they were faithful. In this long-awaited sequel to his Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul, Hays highlights the theological consequences of the Gospel writers’ distinctive hermeneutical approaches and asks what it might mean for contemporary readers to attempt to read Scripture through the eyes of the Evangelists. In particular, Hays carefully describes the Evangelists’ practice of figural reading—an imaginative and retrospective move that creates narrative continuity and wholeness. He shows how each Gospel artfully uses scriptural echoes to re-narrate Israel’s story, to assert that Jesus is the embodiment of Israel’s God, and to prod the church in its vocation to engage the pagan world. Hays shows how the Evangelists summon readers to a conversion of their imagination. The Evangelists’ use of scriptural echo beckons readers to believe the extraordinary: that Jesus was Israel’s Messiah, that Jesus is Israel’s God, and that contemporary believers are still on mission. The Evangelists, according to Hays, are training our scriptural senses, calling readers to be better scriptural people by being better scriptural poets. ; PrefaceIntroduction: Figural Interpretation of Israel’s ScriptureThe Evangelists as Readers of Israel’s ScripturePart 1. The Gospel of Mark: Herald of Mystery1. "Take heed what you hear": Mark as Interpreter of Scripture2. Apocalyptic Judgment and Expectancy: Israel’s Story in Mark’s Narrative3. Jesus as the Crucified Messiah4. Watchful Endurance: The Church’s Suffering in Mark’s Narrative5. "Hidden in order to be revealed": Mark’s Scriptural HermeneuticsPart 2. The Gospel of Matthew: Torah Transfigured6. The Law and the Prophets Fulfilled: Matthew as Interpreter of Scripture7. The End of Exile: Israel’s Story in Matthew’s Narrative8. Jesus as Emmanuel9. Making Disciples of All Nations: The Church’s Mission in Matthew’s Narrative10. The Transfiguration of Torah: Matthew’s Scriptural HermeneuticsPart 3. The Gospel of Luke: The Liberation of Israel11. Continuing the Scriptural Story: Luke as Interpreter of Scripture12. The Promise of Israel’s Liberation: Israel’s Story in Luke’s Narrative13. Jesus as the Redeemer of Israel14. Light to the Nations: The Church’s Witness in Luke’s Narrative15. Opened Eyes and Minds: Luke’s Scriptural HermeneuticsPart 4. The Gospel of John: The Temple of His Body16. "Come and see": John as Interpreter of Scripture17. "Salvation is from the Jews": Israel’s Story in John’s Narrative18. Jesus as the Temple19. The Vine and the Branches: The Church’s Oneness in John’s Narrative20. The Figural Web: John’s Scriptural HermeneuticsConclusion: Did Not Our Hearts Burn within Us?NotesBibliographyIndex of Scripture and Ancient SourcesIndex of Names

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2016

      Reading Backwards

      Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness

      by Richard B. Hays

      In Reading Backwards Richard B. Hays maps the shocking ways the four Gospel writers interpreted Israel's Scripture to craft their literary witnesses to the Church's one Christ. The Gospels' scriptural imagination discovered inside the long tradition of a resilient Jewish monotheism a novel and revolutionary Christology.Modernity's incredulity toward the Christian faith partly rests upon the characterization of early Christian preaching as a tendentious misreading of the Hebrew Scriptures. Christianity, modernity claims, twisted the Bible they inherited to fit its message about a mythological divine Savior. The Gospels, for many modern critics, are thus more about Christian doctrine in the second and third century than they are about Jesus in the first.Such Christian "misreadings" are not late or politically motivated developments within Christian thought. As Hays demonstrates, the claim that the events of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection took place "according to the Scriptures" stands at the very heart of the New Testament's earliest message. All four canonical Gospels declare that the Torah and the Prophets and the Psalms mysteriously prefigure Jesus. The author of the Fourth Gospel puts the claim succinctly: "If you believed Moses, you would believe me, for he wrote about me" (John 5:46).Hays thus traces the reading strategies the Gospel writers employ to "read backwards" and to discover how the Old Testament figuratively discloses the astonishing paradoxical truth about Jesus' identity. Attention to Jewish and Old Testament roots of the Gospel narratives reveals that each of the four Evangelists, in their diverse portrayals, identify Jesus as the embodiment of the God of Israel. Hays also explores the hermeneutical challenges posed by attempting to follow the Evangelists as readers of Israel's Scripture—can the Evangelists teach us to read backwards along with them and to discern the same mystery they discovered in Israel's story?In Reading Backwards Hays demonstrates that it was Israel's Scripture itself that taught the Gospel writers how to understand Jesus as the embodied presence of God, that this conversion of imagination occurred early in the development of Christian theology, and that the Gospel writers' revisionary figural readings of their Bible stand at the very center of Christianity. ; Introduction1. "The Manger in Which Christ Lies": Figural Readings of Israel’s ScriptureThe Fourfold Witness2. Figuring the Mystery: Reading Scripture with Mark3. Torah Transfigured: Reading Scripture with Matthew4. The One Who Redeems Israel: Reading Scripture with Luke5. The Temple Transfigured: Reading Scripture with JohnConclusion6. Retrospective Reading: The Challenges of Gospel-Shaped Hermeneutics

    • Biblical studies & exegesis
      July 1990

      The Wound of Knowledge

      by Rowan Williams (By (author))

      A penetrating, psychological and intellectual analysis of Christian spirituality from the New Testament to St John of the Cross.

    • Translation & interpretation
      November 2008

      Isaac On Jewish and Christian Altars

      Polemic and Exegesis in Rashi and the Glossa Ordinaria

      by Devorah Schoenfeld

    • Religion: general

      A Telling Place

      Reflections On Stories of Women in the Bible

      by Joy. Mead

    • Christianity

      Ail Drannoeth

      Ambell Sylw a Myfyrdod

      by John Gwilym Jones

    • Bible readings, selections & meditations

      Present On Earth

      Worship Resources On the Life of Jesus

      by

      This collection of responsive prayers, dialogues, monologues, extended scripts and other pieces forms the third book in the series started by "Cloth for the Cradle" and "Stages on the Way". While these first two focused on the beginning and ending of Jesus' earthly life, "Present on Earth" is concerned with the years inbetween - with the encounters and conversations, the rumour and reputation, the moments of deep assurance and equally deep provocation which marked Jesus' three year ministry. As a resouce for worship and group work this material makes us aware ina very immediate way of the vulnerable intimacy which God in becoming human.

    • Bible readings, selections & meditations

      Amser I Dduw - Trysorfa O Weddiau Hen a Newydd

      by

    • Bible readings, selections & meditations

      Dandelions and Thistles

      Biblical Meditations from the Iona Community

      by Jan S. Pickard

    • Biblical studies & exegesis
      December 2002

      Scrolls of Love

      Ruth and the Song of Songs

      by Edited by Peter S. Hawkins, and Lesleigh Cushing Stahlberg

    • Bible readings, selections & meditations

      Advent Readings from Iona

      by Brian. Woodcock

    • Christian worship, rites & ceremonies

      Lent & Easter Readings from Iona

      by Neil. Paynter

      Lent is traditionally a time of repentance and penitence but it also offers an opportunity to see the world afresh, with a new sense of wonder. These readings, up to Easter and beyond, encourage us not only to regard ourselves with a healthy realism and accept responsibility for our shortcomings, but also to recognise the nature and purposes of God and the never-ending renewal of possibility, both within ourselves and in the world.

    • Biblical studies & exegesis

      Tell Me the Stories of Jesus

      A Companion to the Remembered Gospel

      by Janet. Lees

    • Bible readings, selections & meditations

      Under the Gaze of the Bible

      by Jean-Louis Chretien, , Translated by John Marson Dunaway

      Chretien’s essays on reading sacred scripture are enriched by his immersion in the classics of ancient philosophy and theology, as well as his poetic sensibility. He is as likely to quote Claudel as Aquinas or Origen. His intimate acquaintance with Patristic writings combines with a sympathetic understanding of such Protestant sources as Luther, Calvin, and Barth to yield an admirably ecumenical perspective. The book’s title refers to James 1:23–24, which portrays the Word of God as a mirror into which one gazes. The concomitant notion of not only examining the text but also being examined by the Word is a fruitful one for learning how to be more fully nourished by one’s study of the Bible.

    • Bible readings, selections & meditations

      Under the Gaze of the Bible

      by Jean-Louis Chretien, , Translated by John Marson Dunaway

      Chretien’s essays on reading sacred scripture are enriched by his immersion in the classics of ancient philosophy and theology, as well as his poetic sensibility. He is as likely to quote Claudel as Aquinas or Origen. His intimate acquaintance with Patristic writings combines with a sympathetic understanding of such Protestant sources as Luther, Calvin, and Barth to yield an admirably ecumenical perspective. The book’s title refers to James 1:23–24, which portrays the Word of God as a mirror into which one gazes. The concomitant notion of not only examining the text but also being examined by the Word is a fruitful one for learning how to be more fully nourished by one’s study of the Bible.

    • Religion: general
      August 2014

      The origin of the Old Testament

      by Walter Dietrich / Hans-Peter Mathys / Thomas Römer / Rudolf Smend

      This teaching and textbook describes the biblical writings, first by content and structure, and then follows their process of coming into being back to the respective reason for their origin. The framework for this is the canon of the Hebrew Bible, which is defined in the introductory section by the Greek and Christian Bible and the so-called Apocrypha. The four parts of the volume are introduced by overview chapters: the Pentateuch as a whole, the Deuteronomistic historical work, the phenomenon of prophecy and Hebrew poetry. The author also appropriately discusses the progress and current state of research. Comprehensive bibliographies characterise the entire work. Anyone wishing to intensively examine the Old Testament and its origins will obtain sound information here.

    • Biblical studies & exegesis
      May 2015

      Bibliolog (English Edition)

      A Creative Access to the Bible – English edition

      by Uta Pohl-Patalong

      „Bibliolog“ is an approach to experience the Bible as alive and important for one‘s own life. A group, congregation or school class discovers biblical stories from within and interprets them by identifying with biblical characters and answering questions left unanswered by the text. Invented by North-American Jewish scholar Peter Pitzele, this approach has its roots in the Jewish tradition of Midrash. It is fascinating how quickly people - whether they have been socialized by the church or not - can be moved by biblical texts when they immediately experience how relevant they still are. Bibliolog has quickly spread across the German-speaking area and is now practiced in many different countries. The growing experience with this approach has led to the decision to offer this concise presentation to an English-speaking audience. Pohl-Patalong focuses on the basic form of Bibliolog, which can be performed in a short period of time and with groups of any size.

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