• Self-help & personal development

      Master Key Arcana

      by Charles F. Haanel and others (Thomas Troward, Dr. T.R. Sanjivi, James Allen)

      When The Master Key System was first released circa 1916, it created quite a stir. It was supposedly banned by some groups and rumors abounded about it influencing some of the most wealthy and powerful people in the world. Master Key Arcana contains a wealth of new writings by Charles F. Haanel and others, some of which were “lost” as time passed. It is the perfect companion to those who have read The Master Key System. It is also a wonderful introduction to what many consider to be the finest book ever written on the powers of the mind and how to attain your goals, dreams, and desires. Included in this handy and illuminating tome are: ▪ A unique psychological chart to help assess where you stand and how you can improve. ▪ Writings about The Master Key System to help you better understand Haanel and his ideas. ▪ Writings that influenced Mr. Haanel, such as Judge Thomas Troward and Henry Drummond. ▪ Images of Haanel’s original and now rare correspondence courses. ▪ The “lost” parts of The Master Key System published for the first time in over sixty years. Master Key Arcana is a wonderful look at the influences of The Master Key System, how it influenced others, and how to best utilize it to attain your full potential. The “lost” parts are worth the price of admission alone. The results of reading this book, though, are priceless.

    • Self-help & personal development

      Keeping the Faith

      Daily Reflections to Build Strength, Serenity, and Passion in Your Life and the Lives of Others

      by John W. Pozzi

      THE TRUE FAITH THAT MUST BE FOUND AND KEPT IS THE FAITH IN ONESELF. Each day you give a part of yourself whether it is at work, at home, or in your daily interaction with others. How do you give of yourself? Do you hold back or go at life half-heartedly? You need to give of yourself with heart, mind, and soul all the time. You never know what interaction with a person will make a difference in their life — or yours. If you don’t believe in yourself and don’t have the confidence to grow each day, then you are missing out on what life has to offer you. This simple book will inspire you to help others. Or, at the very least, you will make another person’s day — and, therefore, your day — better.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2014

      Seriously Dangerous Religion

      What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters

      by Iain Provan

      The Old Testament is often maligned as an outmoded and even dangerous text. Best-selling authors like Richard Dawkins, Karen Armstrong, and Derrick Jensen are prime examples of those who find the Old Testament to be problematic to modern sensibilities. Iain Provan counters that such easy and popular readings misunderstand the Old Testament. He opposes modern misconceptions of the Old Testament by addressing ten fundamental questions that the biblical text should--and according to Provan does--answer: questions such as "Who is God?" and "Why do evil and suffering mark the world?" By focusing on Genesis and drawing on other Old Testament and extra-biblical sources, Seriously Dangerous Religion constructs a more plausible reading. As it turns out, Provan argues, the Old Testament is far more dangerous than modern critics even suppose. Its dangers are the bold claims it makes upon its readers. ; 1 Of Mice, and Men, and HobbitsStories, Art, and Life2 The Up Quark, the Down Quark, and Other Cool Stuff What Is the World?3 Slow to Anger, Abounding in Love, and (Thankfully) Jealous Who Is God?4 Of Humus and Humanity Who Are Man and Woman?5 It Isn't Natural Why Do Evil and Suffering Mark the World?6 On Living in a Blighted World What Am I to Do about Evil and Suffering?7 Even the Stork Knows That How Am I to Relate to God?8 Love All, Trust a Few, Do Wrong to None How Am I to Relate to My Neighbor?9 On Keeping the Earth How Am I to Relate to the Rest of Creation?10 I Saw the New Jerusalem Which Society Should I Be Helping to Build?11 A Bird Perched in the Soul What Am I to Hope For?12 Further Up and Further In New Dimensions in the Old Story13 On the Judicious Closing of the Mind The Question of Truth14 Risk Assessment Is the Story Dangerous?Postscript: Biblical Faith for a New AgeNotesBibliographyScripture IndexIndex of AuthorsSubject Index

    • Christian theology
      June 2016

      Echoes of Scripture in the Gospels

      by Richard B. Hays

      The claim that the events of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection took place "according to the Scriptures" stands at the heart of the New Testament’s message. All four canonical Gospels declare that the Torah and the Prophets and the Psalms mysteriously prefigure Jesus. The author of the Fourth Gospel states this claim succinctly: in his narrative, Jesus declares, "If you believed Moses, you would believe me, for he wrote about me" (John 5:46). Yet modern historical criticism characteristically judges that the New Testament’s christological readings of Israel’s Scripture misrepresent the original sense of the texts; this judgment forces fundamental questions to be asked: Why do the Gospel writers read the Scriptures in such surprising ways? Are their readings intelligible as coherent or persuasive interpretations of the Scriptures? Does Christian faith require the illegitimate theft of someone else’s sacred texts? Echoes of Scripture in the Gospels answers these questions. Richard B. Hays chronicles the dramatically different ways the four Gospel writers interpreted Israel’s Scripture and reveals that their readings were as complementary as they were faithful. In this long-awaited sequel to his Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul, Hays highlights the theological consequences of the Gospel writers’ distinctive hermeneutical approaches and asks what it might mean for contemporary readers to attempt to read Scripture through the eyes of the Evangelists. In particular, Hays carefully describes the Evangelists’ practice of figural reading—an imaginative and retrospective move that creates narrative continuity and wholeness. He shows how each Gospel artfully uses scriptural echoes to re-narrate Israel’s story, to assert that Jesus is the embodiment of Israel’s God, and to prod the church in its vocation to engage the pagan world. Hays shows how the Evangelists summon readers to a conversion of their imagination. The Evangelists’ use of scriptural echo beckons readers to believe the extraordinary: that Jesus was Israel’s Messiah, that Jesus is Israel’s God, and that contemporary believers are still on mission. The Evangelists, according to Hays, are training our scriptural senses, calling readers to be better scriptural people by being better scriptural poets. ; PrefaceIntroduction: Figural Interpretation of Israel’s ScriptureThe Evangelists as Readers of Israel’s ScripturePart 1. The Gospel of Mark: Herald of Mystery1. "Take heed what you hear": Mark as Interpreter of Scripture2. Apocalyptic Judgment and Expectancy: Israel’s Story in Mark’s Narrative3. Jesus as the Crucified Messiah4. Watchful Endurance: The Church’s Suffering in Mark’s Narrative5. "Hidden in order to be revealed": Mark’s Scriptural HermeneuticsPart 2. The Gospel of Matthew: Torah Transfigured6. The Law and the Prophets Fulfilled: Matthew as Interpreter of Scripture7. The End of Exile: Israel’s Story in Matthew’s Narrative8. Jesus as Emmanuel9. Making Disciples of All Nations: The Church’s Mission in Matthew’s Narrative10. The Transfiguration of Torah: Matthew’s Scriptural HermeneuticsPart 3. The Gospel of Luke: The Liberation of Israel11. Continuing the Scriptural Story: Luke as Interpreter of Scripture12. The Promise of Israel’s Liberation: Israel’s Story in Luke’s Narrative13. Jesus as the Redeemer of Israel14. Light to the Nations: The Church’s Witness in Luke’s Narrative15. Opened Eyes and Minds: Luke’s Scriptural HermeneuticsPart 4. The Gospel of John: The Temple of His Body16. "Come and see": John as Interpreter of Scripture17. "Salvation is from the Jews": Israel’s Story in John’s Narrative18. Jesus as the Temple19. The Vine and the Branches: The Church’s Oneness in John’s Narrative20. The Figural Web: John’s Scriptural HermeneuticsConclusion: Did Not Our Hearts Burn within Us?NotesBibliographyIndex of Scripture and Ancient SourcesIndex of Names

    • History
      September 2016

      Destroyer of the gods

      Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World

      by Larry W. Hurtado

      "Silly," "stupid," "irrational," "simple." "Wicked," "hateful," "obstinate," "anti-social." "Extravagant," "perverse." The Roman world rendered harsh judgments upon early Christianity—including branding Christianity "new." Novelty was no Roman religious virtue.Nevertheless, as Larry W. Hurtado shows in Destroyer of the gods, Christianity thrived despite its new and distinctive features and opposition to them. Unlike nearly all other religious groups, Christianity utterly rejected the traditional gods of the Roman world. Christianity also offered a new and different kind of religious identity, one not based on ethnicity. Christianity was distinctively a "bookish" religion, with the production, copying, distribution, and reading of texts as central to its faith, even preferring a distinctive book-form, the codex. Christianity insisted that its adherents behave differently: unlike the simple ritual observances characteristic of the pagan religious environment, embracing Christian faith meant a behavioral transformation, with particular and novel ethical demands for men. Unquestionably, to the Roman world, Christianity was both new and different, and, to a good many, it threatened social and religious conventions of the day.In the rejection of the gods and in the centrality of texts, early Christianity obviously reflected commitments inherited from its Jewish origins. But these particular features were no longer identified with Jewish ethnicity and early Christianity quickly became aggressively trans-ethnic—a novel kind of religious movement. Its ethical teaching, too, bore some resemblance to the philosophers of the day, yet in contrast with these great teachers and their small circles of dedicated students, early Christianity laid its hard demands upon all adherents from the moment of conversion, producing a novel social project. Christianity’s novelty was no badge of honor. Called atheists and suspected of political subversion, Christians earned Roman disdain and suspicion in equal amounts. Yet, as Destroyer of the gods demonstrates, in an irony of history the very features of early Christianity that rendered it distinctive and objectionable in Roman eyes have now become so commonplace in Western culture as to go unnoticed. Christianity helped destroy one world and create another. ; PrefaceIntroductionChapter 1. Early Christians and Christianity in the Eyes of Non-ChristiansChapter 2. A New Kind of FaithChapter 3. A Different IdentityChapter 4. A "Bookish" ReligionChapter 5. A New Way to LiveConclusionAppendixNotesIndex of Ancient SourcesIndex of Subjects and Modern Authors

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2016

      Reading Backwards

      Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness

      by Richard B. Hays

      In Reading Backwards Richard B. Hays maps the shocking ways the four Gospel writers interpreted Israel's Scripture to craft their literary witnesses to the Church's one Christ. The Gospels' scriptural imagination discovered inside the long tradition of a resilient Jewish monotheism a novel and revolutionary Christology.Modernity's incredulity toward the Christian faith partly rests upon the characterization of early Christian preaching as a tendentious misreading of the Hebrew Scriptures. Christianity, modernity claims, twisted the Bible they inherited to fit its message about a mythological divine Savior. The Gospels, for many modern critics, are thus more about Christian doctrine in the second and third century than they are about Jesus in the first.Such Christian "misreadings" are not late or politically motivated developments within Christian thought. As Hays demonstrates, the claim that the events of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection took place "according to the Scriptures" stands at the very heart of the New Testament's earliest message. All four canonical Gospels declare that the Torah and the Prophets and the Psalms mysteriously prefigure Jesus. The author of the Fourth Gospel puts the claim succinctly: "If you believed Moses, you would believe me, for he wrote about me" (John 5:46).Hays thus traces the reading strategies the Gospel writers employ to "read backwards" and to discover how the Old Testament figuratively discloses the astonishing paradoxical truth about Jesus' identity. Attention to Jewish and Old Testament roots of the Gospel narratives reveals that each of the four Evangelists, in their diverse portrayals, identify Jesus as the embodiment of the God of Israel. Hays also explores the hermeneutical challenges posed by attempting to follow the Evangelists as readers of Israel's Scripture—can the Evangelists teach us to read backwards along with them and to discern the same mystery they discovered in Israel's story?In Reading Backwards Hays demonstrates that it was Israel's Scripture itself that taught the Gospel writers how to understand Jesus as the embodied presence of God, that this conversion of imagination occurred early in the development of Christian theology, and that the Gospel writers' revisionary figural readings of their Bible stand at the very center of Christianity. ; Introduction1. "The Manger in Which Christ Lies": Figural Readings of Israel’s ScriptureThe Fourfold Witness2. Figuring the Mystery: Reading Scripture with Mark3. Torah Transfigured: Reading Scripture with Matthew4. The One Who Redeems Israel: Reading Scripture with Luke5. The Temple Transfigured: Reading Scripture with JohnConclusion6. Retrospective Reading: The Challenges of Gospel-Shaped Hermeneutics

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      Light in the Darkness

      Four Christian Apologists

      by Jon Elsby

      Christian apologetics is an important area of intellectual endeavour and achievement, standing at the boundaries between theology, philosophy and literature. Yet it has been largely neglected by historians of literature and ideas. In these essays, the author attempts to establish apologetics as a subject deserving of respect in its own right. He analyses the apologetic arguments and strategies of four of the greatest Christian apologists of the twentieth century – Hilaire Belloc, G. K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, and C. S. Lewis. He shows how different lines of argument support each other and converge on the same conclusion: that what Chesterton called ‘orthodoxy’ and Lewis ‘mere Christianity’ represents the fundamental truth about the relations between human beings, the universe, and God.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2017

      Orthodoxy

      With an Introduction by Jon Elsby

      by G. K. Chesterton

      G. K. Chesterton wrote of Orthodoxy that it represented an attempt ‘to state the philosophy in which I have come to believe’ and to do so ‘in a vague and personal way, in a set of mental pictures rather than in a series of deductions’. For most of its readers, it is the wittiest and most rollicking defence of the Christian faith ever written. Anticipating much modern theology, Catholic and Protestant, Chesterton’s apologia is more personalistic than propositional. He understands that, in order to be credible, a belief system must appeal to the heart as well as to the mind. No one has set out more engagingly the reasons for believing in Christianity as the timeless truth about who we are, and rejecting the alternatives as fads and fashions. Jon Elsby, author of Light in the Darkness and Wrestling With the Angel, has written extensively on Christian apologists and apologetics, and has penned an illuminating introduction for this edition of Orthodoxy, which also contains brief notes and an index.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2015

      Wrestling With the Angel

      A Convert's Tale

      by Jon Elsby

      Who am I? Am I an autonomous being, able to define myself by my own free choices, or a created being with a given human nature, living in a world which, in significant respects, does not depend on me? Are these two views necessarily opposed? Wrestling With the Angel is one man’s attempt to answer those questions. Raised as a Protestant, the author lost his faith in his teenage years, and then gradually regained it – but in an unexpected form. This is the story of a spiritual and intellectual journey from Protestantism to atheism, and beyond: a journey which finally, and much to the author’s surprise, reached its terminus in the Catholic Church.

    • Anglican & Episcopalian Churches, Church of England
      January 2014

      Anglican Identities (new edition)

      by Rowan Williams (By (author))

      Is there an ‘Anglican identity’? Or is living with the tension between different temperaments and histories itself at the heart of the genius of Anglicanism? Anglican Identities draws together studies and profiles by Rowan Williams that sympathetically explore approaches to scripture, tradition, and authority that are very different – yet at the same time distinctively Anglican. William Tyndale, Richard Hooker, George Herbert, B. F. Westcott, Michael Ramsey, and John A. T. Robinson are among the writers and theologians whose work he explores. Anglican Identities conveys the richness of the Anglican mosaic without ducking the difficult question of how far diversity can stretch.

    • Christian theology
      May 2010

      Bible and Ecology

      Rediscovering the Community of Creation

      by Richard Bauckham (By (author))

      In this well-argued and timely book, Bauckham considers the relationship of humans to the rest of creation. He argues that there is much more to the Bible’s understanding of this relationship than the mandate of human dominion given in Genesis 1, which has too often been used as a justification for domination and exploitation of the earth’s resources. He also critiques the notion of stewardship as being on the one hand presumptuous, and on the other too general a term to explain our key responsibilities in caring for the earth. In countering this, he considers other biblical perspectives, including the book of Job, the Psalms and the Gospels, and re-evaluates the biblical tradition of ‘dominion’, in favour of a ‘community of creation’. With its clear analysis and thought-provoking conclusions, The Bible and Ecology is an essential read for anyone interested in a biblically grounded approach to ecology.

    • Christian social thought & activity
      October 2003

      Clashing Symbols

      An Introduction to Faith and Culture

      by Michael Paul Gallagher (By (author))

      What is the place of religious belief modern culture? Recent years have seen cataclysmic changes in society, yet, far from being banished from today's world, religion is assuming a new significance. Since its original publication in 1997, Clashing Symbols has become recognised as the most accessible and authoritative introduction to a crucial are in religious studies: the relationship between faith and culture. Michael Paul Gallagher introduces all the major figures, issues and debates in this ideal guide for students and thoughtful Christians who want to discern the realities of contemporary culture.

    • Christianity
      December 2004

      Discovering Girard

      by Michael Kirwan (By (author))

      The work of Rene Girard is hugely influential in literature and cultural studies. But it is in understanding the relationship between religion and violence that his theory has created the greatest impact. Girard’s understanding of mimetic rivalry and conflict and of scapegoating are seen by many to be the key to a completely new understanding of Christianity. Girard’s name evokes curiosity and – often – strong feelings amongst devotees and sceptics. Discovering Girard is the first book to present Girard’s work to a wider audience in a way that not only explains and appraises his work and shows its impact on theology and other disciplines but conveys the sense of excitement that a discovery of Girard’s ideas often generates in readers.

    • Christian theology
      April 2010

      Door into the Sacred

      A Meditation on the Hail Mary

      by Paul Murray (By (author))

      A short but intense and beautifully written study of the ‘Hail Mary’ by the Irish theologian, poet and Dominican priest, Paul Murray. For almost an entire millennium the most commonly repeated prayer in the Church, apart from the Our Father, has been the Hail Mary. It’s a prayer that, with great simplicity and ease, brings us at once into the mystery of God incarnate, the mystery of Jesus, son of Mary. For countless numbers of people over the centuries it has proved to be a threshold of grace, a real opening into the mystery and meaning of God’s love, a ‘holy door’. The Hail Mary is a prayer which is easy to say, easy to pray. But as Paul Murray shows in this short book it also has a radiance and depth of theological truth. "My hope in writing this tiny book is that, by giving space to some of the most moving and most profound reflections ever written on the Hail Mary, a door will open for the reader into a world in which the strenuous task of thinking and the easeful grace of feeling can both be considered sacred, and where wisdom and enchantment, theology and devotion, are found, at core, to be one and the same thing."

    • Christian prayer
      July 2010

      Finding Your Hidden Treasure

      The Way of Silent Prayer

      by Benigus O'Rourke OSA (By (author))

      The most important journey in life is the journey inwards, to the depths of our own being. It is a journey we are all invited to make. It takes us beyond words and images into silence. The silence allows the restless mind to become still and in the stillness we enter a new world. We return to our hearts. Here we find our true selves. We discover an ancient way of finding God that has almost become lost. Slowly, we realise that we are in union with the source of life and love itself. Our whole life changes. Our goal now is to take God's love to others in our everyday lives.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2018

      Following The Celtic Way

      A New Assessment of Celtic Christianity

      by Ian Bradley

      Marking the 25th anniversary of Ian Bradley’s classic The Celtic Way – the scholarly and accessible popular introduction to Celtic Christianity – Following the Celtic Way is a completely new book that replaces the original. It incorporates the wisdom garnered by Bradley over more than thirty years of research, lecturing, broadcasting and retreat-leading, and identifies the themes of the Celtic Way which are most relevant to and can be followed today by twenty-first century Christians. The core chapters are: ‘Marks of the Church and the Faithful’, ‘Attributes of God’, ‘Our Appropriate Responses’ and ‘Ways Forward for the Church’.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2017

      Found Out

      Women’s faith in sexuality

      by Alison Webster

      More than twenty years after Found Wanting, her acclaimed critique of the Church and women’s sexuality, Alison Webster presents a positive book of practical theology that gives voice to the experiences of marginalised women. In response to the challenges of today, including people trafficking, greater exposure to internet pornography, a rise in mental ill-health, she puts forward a new model of faith identity based on Jesus as fundamentally a boundary-crosser (divine/human), reclaiming as positive the often painful place of being ‘in-between’, of not belonging.

    • Christian life & practice
      January 2008

      God of Surprises

      by Gerard W. Hughes (By (author))

      Jesus said, ‘The kingdom of God is like a treasure hidden in a field’. God of Surprises shows how we can find that treasure in the most unlikely of places – ourselves. Written for ‘bewildered, confused and disillusioned Christians’ as a guide for the inner spiritual journey in which we are all engaged, God of Surprises has much to say to those who have a love/hate relationship with the Church to which they belong or once belonged. This is an unforgettable book that has changed the lives of hundreds of thousands of readers. God of Surprises is also available as a course study package for groups, ideal for Lent use. Each pack includes an audio cassette and ten copies of the accompanying booklet. The booklet includes extracts from the original book plus new material written by Hughes for the course, and ends with suggestions for different ways of praying.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Hidden Wings

      Emerging from troubled times with new hope and deeper wisdom

      by Margaret Silf

      Hidden Wings is a superb book of spiritual transformation and hope for the future, by Margaret Silf, the bestselling author of Landmarks and At Sea with God. As the world around us moves into a period of immense and tumultuous change, and the structures and values by which we have charted our lives seem to be collapsing around us, many people are struggling to plot their spiritual path through an unfamiliar landscape or to believe in tomorrow. Using the analogy of the caterpillar entering the devastating, world-altering stage of the chrysalis, before emerging - transformed - as the butterfly, Margaret Silf demonstrates that this moment could be an opportunity for immense spiritual transformation and hope for the future.

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