• Religion & beliefs
      August 2011

      How to Overcome Depression

      by J.P. Vaswani

      All of us have felt sad or depressed at one time or another in our lives. People often go into depression after bereavement, an injury, a failure or a loss. Some people can suffer from severe depression when their vanity has been hurt. Rev. Dada J.P. Vaswani’s is the voice of wisdom and compassion that whispers its message of healing and comfort to us: “One there is, who cares!” he assures us. “Trust Him, Rely on Him, look to him at all times, and you will find that He never lets you down!” is Rev. Dada’s reassuring message to us. If you are looking for guidance, moral support and reassurance to feel that you are not alone in the quest of your life, look no further than the pages of this small volume.

    • Religion & beliefs
      August 2011

      The Goal of Life and How to Attain it

      Spiritual Sadhanas For Everyone

      by J.P. Vaswani

      Ask anyone you know the following questions: Have you secured your investments for the future? Have you planned your vacation for the year? Have you taken medical insurance? Have you applied for your housing loan? Strange, but true, we plan for every eventuality of life, but we hardly stop to think about the ultimate purpose, the goal of human life, the Liberation which we all long to achieve. But we need not despair, for help is at hand with Rev. Dada J.P. Vaswani’s inspirational, yet eminently practical guide to sadhana – the means of achieving the ultimate goal of human life.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2008

      Hindu Pilgrimage

      A Journey Through The Holy Places Of Hindus All Over India

      by Sunita Pant Bansal

      As humans, we lead a life full of struggle and strife. During trying moments, we might knowingly or unknowingly indulge in actions that may be sinful. After a certain time, the wrong actions start weighing us down, and our conscience prods us to atone for our sins. That is when we consider visiting a teertha, where we can go and ask for forgiveness. Such a spiritual journey is termed as a pilgrimage or teertha yatra, which is one of the distinguished facets of Hinduism. Though, undertaking a religious journey is not mandatory in this religion, still a number of Hindus visit the teerthas every year in search of peace and enlightenment. Most of the teerthas are located in calm and secluded places surrounded by the pristine Beauty Care of nature. These places may be near a water source, a mountain or a forest. Their environs are further sanctified by the presence of the holy men and their regular mantra chanting. Such places provide immense peace to the soul. Hindu Pilgrimage - The Teerthas takes you on a mental journey to such spiritual places in India. The book discusses in detail Chaar Dhaam, Himalayan Chaar Dhaam, Sapt Puri, Dwadash Jyotirlingam, Panch Sarovar, Sapt Sarita, Divya Desam, Shakti Peetha, Yatras and also some of the famous temples in India. Enhanced with vivid and exclusive pictures, the book brings the places alive and inspires one to make a pilgrimage to these holy shrines.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2016

      Die Jüdische Revolution

      Untersuchungen zu Ursachen, Verlauf und Folgen der hasmonäischen Erhebung

      by Johannes Christian Bernhardt

      In 168 BCE, the Seleucid King Antiochus IV intervened against the Temple cult in Jerusalem, resulting in a revolt by the Hasmoneans that led to their establishment as high priests and to the independence of Judea. This study examines the causes and the consequences of the revolt as an historical process and offers a political-theological interpretation of the events. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2014

      Seriously Dangerous Religion

      What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters

      by Iain Provan

      The Old Testament is often maligned as an outmoded and even dangerous text. Best-selling authors like Richard Dawkins, Karen Armstrong, and Derrick Jensen are prime examples of those who find the Old Testament to be problematic to modern sensibilities. Iain Provan counters that such easy and popular readings misunderstand the Old Testament. He opposes modern misconceptions of the Old Testament by addressing ten fundamental questions that the biblical text should--and according to Provan does--answer: questions such as "Who is God?" and "Why do evil and suffering mark the world?" By focusing on Genesis and drawing on other Old Testament and extra-biblical sources, Seriously Dangerous Religion constructs a more plausible reading. As it turns out, Provan argues, the Old Testament is far more dangerous than modern critics even suppose. Its dangers are the bold claims it makes upon its readers. ; 1 Of Mice, and Men, and HobbitsStories, Art, and Life2 The Up Quark, the Down Quark, and Other Cool Stuff What Is the World?3 Slow to Anger, Abounding in Love, and (Thankfully) Jealous Who Is God?4 Of Humus and Humanity Who Are Man and Woman?5 It Isn't Natural Why Do Evil and Suffering Mark the World?6 On Living in a Blighted World What Am I to Do about Evil and Suffering?7 Even the Stork Knows That How Am I to Relate to God?8 Love All, Trust a Few, Do Wrong to None How Am I to Relate to My Neighbor?9 On Keeping the Earth How Am I to Relate to the Rest of Creation?10 I Saw the New Jerusalem Which Society Should I Be Helping to Build?11 A Bird Perched in the Soul What Am I to Hope For?12 Further Up and Further In New Dimensions in the Old Story13 On the Judicious Closing of the Mind The Question of Truth14 Risk Assessment Is the Story Dangerous?Postscript: Biblical Faith for a New AgeNotesBibliographyScripture IndexIndex of AuthorsSubject Index

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2016

      Reading Backwards

      Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness

      by Richard B. Hays

      In Reading Backwards Richard B. Hays maps the shocking ways the four Gospel writers interpreted Israel's Scripture to craft their literary witnesses to the Church's one Christ. The Gospels' scriptural imagination discovered inside the long tradition of a resilient Jewish monotheism a novel and revolutionary Christology.Modernity's incredulity toward the Christian faith partly rests upon the characterization of early Christian preaching as a tendentious misreading of the Hebrew Scriptures. Christianity, modernity claims, twisted the Bible they inherited to fit its message about a mythological divine Savior. The Gospels, for many modern critics, are thus more about Christian doctrine in the second and third century than they are about Jesus in the first.Such Christian "misreadings" are not late or politically motivated developments within Christian thought. As Hays demonstrates, the claim that the events of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection took place "according to the Scriptures" stands at the very heart of the New Testament's earliest message. All four canonical Gospels declare that the Torah and the Prophets and the Psalms mysteriously prefigure Jesus. The author of the Fourth Gospel puts the claim succinctly: "If you believed Moses, you would believe me, for he wrote about me" (John 5:46).Hays thus traces the reading strategies the Gospel writers employ to "read backwards" and to discover how the Old Testament figuratively discloses the astonishing paradoxical truth about Jesus' identity. Attention to Jewish and Old Testament roots of the Gospel narratives reveals that each of the four Evangelists, in their diverse portrayals, identify Jesus as the embodiment of the God of Israel. Hays also explores the hermeneutical challenges posed by attempting to follow the Evangelists as readers of Israel's Scripture—can the Evangelists teach us to read backwards along with them and to discern the same mystery they discovered in Israel's story?In Reading Backwards Hays demonstrates that it was Israel's Scripture itself that taught the Gospel writers how to understand Jesus as the embodied presence of God, that this conversion of imagination occurred early in the development of Christian theology, and that the Gospel writers' revisionary figural readings of their Bible stand at the very center of Christianity. ; Introduction1. "The Manger in Which Christ Lies": Figural Readings of Israel’s ScriptureThe Fourfold Witness2. Figuring the Mystery: Reading Scripture with Mark3. Torah Transfigured: Reading Scripture with Matthew4. The One Who Redeems Israel: Reading Scripture with Luke5. The Temple Transfigured: Reading Scripture with JohnConclusion6. Retrospective Reading: The Challenges of Gospel-Shaped Hermeneutics

    • Humanities & Social Sciences

      Light in the Darkness

      Four Christian Apologists

      by Jon Elsby

      Christian apologetics is an important area of intellectual endeavour and achievement, standing at the boundaries between theology, philosophy and literature. Yet it has been largely neglected by historians of literature and ideas. In these essays, the author attempts to establish apologetics as a subject deserving of respect in its own right. He analyses the apologetic arguments and strategies of four of the greatest Christian apologists of the twentieth century – Hilaire Belloc, G. K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, and C. S. Lewis. He shows how different lines of argument support each other and converge on the same conclusion: that what Chesterton called ‘orthodoxy’ and Lewis ‘mere Christianity’ represents the fundamental truth about the relations between human beings, the universe, and God.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2017

      Orthodoxy

      With an Introduction by Jon Elsby

      by G. K. Chesterton

      G. K. Chesterton wrote of Orthodoxy that it represented an attempt ‘to state the philosophy in which I have come to believe’ and to do so ‘in a vague and personal way, in a set of mental pictures rather than in a series of deductions’. For most of its readers, it is the wittiest and most rollicking defence of the Christian faith ever written. Anticipating much modern theology, Catholic and Protestant, Chesterton’s apologia is more personalistic than propositional. He understands that, in order to be credible, a belief system must appeal to the heart as well as to the mind. No one has set out more engagingly the reasons for believing in Christianity as the timeless truth about who we are, and rejecting the alternatives as fads and fashions. Jon Elsby, author of Light in the Darkness and Wrestling With the Angel, has written extensively on Christian apologists and apologetics, and has penned an illuminating introduction for this edition of Orthodoxy, which also contains brief notes and an index.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2015

      Wrestling With the Angel

      A Convert's Tale

      by Jon Elsby

      Who am I? Am I an autonomous being, able to define myself by my own free choices, or a created being with a given human nature, living in a world which, in significant respects, does not depend on me? Are these two views necessarily opposed? Wrestling With the Angel is one man’s attempt to answer those questions. Raised as a Protestant, the author lost his faith in his teenage years, and then gradually regained it – but in an unexpected form. This is the story of a spiritual and intellectual journey from Protestantism to atheism, and beyond: a journey which finally, and much to the author’s surprise, reached its terminus in the Catholic Church.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2017

      Fierce Imaginings

      The Great War, Ritual, Memory and God

      by Rachel Mann

      From Rachel Mann, Canon Poet-in-Residence at Manchester cathedral, comes a lyrical and very personal story of remembrance, faith, family and identity shaped by the chaos and trauma wrought by the Great War and the flux in early twentieth century Europe. Rachel brilliantly explores the significance of the War to all of us today who live under its long shadow – our shared memories, culture and the symbols and relics that linger on all around us, as well as the influence of the Great War on her grandparents and how it echoed through her childhood in 1970s Britain discovering her authentic self in God, undergoing a change of sex and experiencing chronic illness and disability. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2018

      Following The Celtic Way

      A New Assessment of Celtic Christianity

      by Ian Bradley

      Marking the 25th anniversary of Ian Bradley’s classic The Celtic Way – the scholarly and accessible popular introduction to Celtic Christianity – Following the Celtic Way is a completely new book that replaces the original. It incorporates the wisdom garnered by Bradley over more than thirty years of research, lecturing, broadcasting and retreat-leading, and identifies the themes of the Celtic Way which are most relevant to and can be followed today by twenty-first century Christians. The core chapters are: ‘Marks of the Church and the Faithful’, ‘Attributes of God’, ‘Our Appropriate Responses’ and ‘Ways Forward for the Church’.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2017

      Found Out

      Women’s faith in sexuality

      by Alison Webster

      More than twenty years after Found Wanting, her acclaimed critique of the Church and women’s sexuality, Alison Webster presents a positive book of practical theology that gives voice to the experiences of marginalised women. In response to the challenges of today, including people trafficking, greater exposure to internet pornography, a rise in mental ill-health, she puts forward a new model of faith identity based on Jesus as fundamentally a boundary-crosser (divine/human), reclaiming as positive the often painful place of being ‘in-between’, of not belonging.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Hidden Wings

      Emerging from troubled times with new hope and deeper wisdom

      by Margaret Silf

      Hidden Wings is a superb book of spiritual transformation and hope for the future, by Margaret Silf, the bestselling author of Landmarks and At Sea with God. As the world around us moves into a period of immense and tumultuous change, and the structures and values by which we have charted our lives seem to be collapsing around us, many people are struggling to plot their spiritual path through an unfamiliar landscape or to believe in tomorrow. Using the analogy of the caterpillar entering the devastating, world-altering stage of the chrysalis, before emerging - transformed - as the butterfly, Margaret Silf demonstrates that this moment could be an opportunity for immense spiritual transformation and hope for the future.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      Lasting Happiness

      The journey towards wholeness and fulfilment

      by Andrew Parnham

      The creator of The Happiness Course explores what it means to be happy, why being happy is so important to us, and what it may require from us to attain happiness. Andy Parnham shows that finding happiness means searching for wholeness and fulfilment, and is a journey that may not be easy and may not be the path we expected. The book includes a section for people of faith, but has been written for everyone.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2018

      Leaving Faith Behind

      The journeys and perspectives of people who have chosen to leave Islam

      by Fiyaz Mughal, Aliyah Saleem

      The first book of its kind, Leaving Faith Behind tells the true stories of women and men who were born into Muslim families and have made the difficult decision to leave Islam. Stories include the woman who has struggled to live without the hijab because of emotional abuse and threats from her family, the man who was shunned by his community after coming out as gay, the bisexual woman who ran away from home and the man who has created underground networks connecting ostracised and scared ex-Muslims.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Prayers for Depression

      And how best to live with it

      by Fay Sampson

      Prayers for Depression presents prayers and advice for people suffering from depression, and those living with them. The book is divided into three parts. Part A is targeted at those with depression and includes reassuring Bible quotations and prayers. Part B is for partners and includes practical advice for living with depressives as well as prayers. Part C is for wider family and friends and attempts to contextualise depression and is matched with appropriate prayers. There is also a Resource section with helpful contacts and further reading as well as blank pages for readers’ own prayers. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Prayers for Dementia

      And how to live well with it

      by Fay Sampson

      Prayers for Dementia presents prayers and advice for people living with dementia, and those caring for them. The book is divided into three parts. Part A is targeted at those with dementia and includes reassuring Bible quotations and prayers. Part B is for carers and includes practical advice for caring for dementia patients as well as prayers. Part C is for family and friends, indeed the wider community and attempts to contextualise dementia in terms of what it can mean for those beyond patient and carer matched with appropriate prayers. There is also a Resource section with helpful contacts and further reading as well as blank pages for readers’ own prayers. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2018

      Prayers for Anxiety

      And how to live best with it

      by Fay Sampson

      This simple book offers Bible verses and poems of hope and comfort, and short items of information, support and advice about anxiety. Each is accompanied by a suggested prayer. It is divided into three sections. The first group is for the use of those with anxiety. The second is for carers. And the final prayers are for the use of family, friends and the wider community. But you can use any of them with, or on behalf of, someone else.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2018

      Prayers for OCD

      And how to live well with it

      by Fay Sampson

      This simple book offers Bible verses and poems of hope and comfort, and short items of information, support and advice about OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). Each is accompanied by a suggested prayer. It is divided into three sections. The first group is for the use of those with OCD. The second is for carers. And the final prayers are for the use of family, friends and the wider community. But you can use any of them with, or on behalf of, someone else.

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