• Humanities & Social Sciences

      A General Collection of Analects and Thoughts of Confucius and His Disci-ples

      by Yang Chaoming

      Standing from a high-level academic perspective and a cutting-edge academic front, the book absorbs some of the important previous researches and gives detailed and precise annotations and translations of analects and thoughts of Confucius and his disciples. It is believed that the collection has been handed down from the older generations of the Confucius’s family and it is the most reliable and original material on Confucianism. Being easy to read, the book is of high popularizing and academic value.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2018

      New Perspectives on Distributive Justice

      Deep Disagreements, Pluralism, and the Problem of Consensus

      by Manuel Knoll, Stephen Snyder, Nurdane Şimsek

      Distributive justice is one of the most discussed topics in political philosophy. Focusing on the plurality of irreconcilable conceptions of social and political justice, this book presents an array of new perspectives on the topic. Bringing together more than 20 original essays of well-established and young international scholars, the volume is essential reading for anyone interested in social and political justice.

    • Social & political philosophy
      May 2015

      First Measures of the Coming Insurrection

      by Eric Hazan and Kamo

      We have witnessed a beginning, the birth of a new age of revolt and upheaval. In North Africa and the Middle East it took the people a matter of days to topple what were supposedly entrenched regimes. Now, to the west, multiple crises are etching away at a 'democratic consensus' that has, since the 1970's, plagued and suppressed any sparks of revolutionary potential. It is time to prepare for the coming insurrection. In this bold and beautifully written book, Eric Hazan and Kamo provide a short account of what is to be done in the aftermath of a regime's demise: how to prevent any power from restoring itself and how to reorganise society without a central authority and according to the people's needs. Arguing that neither the reshuffling of political leadership, in the guise of 'democratic transition' or 'constitutional progress', nor a 'transition period', classically advocated by 20th century communists, between a capitalist social order and a communist horizon will do, The Irreversible Insurrection is more than the voice of a new generation of revolutionary, it is the manual for the coming, global revolution.

    • Philosophy
      April 2015

      Can Non-Europeans Think?

      with a foreword by Pankaj Mishra

      by Hamid Dabashi

      What happens with thinkers who operate outside the European philosophical 'pedigree'? In this powerfully honed polemic, Dabashi argues that they are invariably marginalised, patronised and mis-represented. Challenging, pugnacious, but also stylish, Can Non-Europeans Think? forges a new perspective in postcolonial studies by looking at how intellectual debate continues to reinforce a colonial regime of knowledge, albeit in a new guise. Based on years of intellectual work and activism, Dabashi delivers a provocative and insightful collection of observations and philosophical explorations, which is certain to unsettle and delight in equal measure.

    • Social & political philosophy

      After Fukushima

      The Equivalence of Catastrophes

      by Jean-Luc Nancy, Translated by Charlotte Mandell

      In this book, the philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy examines the nature of catastrophes in the era of globalization and technology. Can a catastrophe be an isolated occurrence? Is there such a thing as a “natural” catastrophe when all of our technologies—nuclear energy, power supply, water supply—are necessarily implicated, drawing together the biological, social, economic, and political? Nancy examines these questions and more. Exclusive to this English edition are two interviews with Nancy conducted by Danielle Cohen-Levinas and Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki.

    • Social & political philosophy

      After Fukushima

      The Equivalence of Catastrophes

      by Jean-Luc Nancy, Translated by Charlotte Mandell

      In this book, the philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy examines the nature of catastrophes in the era of globalization and technology. Can a catastrophe be an isolated occurrence? Is there such a thing as a “natural” catastrophe when all of our technologies—nuclear energy, power supply, water supply—are necessarily implicated, drawing together the biological, social, economic, and political? Nancy examines these questions and more. Exclusive to this English edition are two interviews with Nancy conducted by Danielle Cohen-Levinas and Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki.

    • Social & political philosophy

      After Fukushima

      The Equivalence of Catastrophes

      by Jean-Luc Nancy, Translated by Charlotte Mandell

      In this book, the philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy examines the nature of catastrophes in the era of globalization and technology. Can a catastrophe be an isolated occurrence? Is there such a thing as a “natural” catastrophe when all of our technologies—nuclear energy, power supply, water supply—are necessarily implicated, drawing together the biological, social, economic, and political? Nancy examines these questions and more. Exclusive to this English edition are two interviews with Nancy conducted by Danielle Cohen-Levinas and Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki.

    • Social & political philosophy

      After Fukushima

      The Equivalence of Catastrophes

      by Jean-Luc Nancy, Translated by Charlotte Mandell

      In this book, the philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy examines the nature of catastrophes in the era of globalization and technology. Can a catastrophe be an isolated occurrence? Is there such a thing as a “natural” catastrophe when all of our technologies—nuclear energy, power supply, water supply—are necessarily implicated, drawing together the biological, social, economic, and political? Nancy examines these questions and more. Exclusive to this English edition are two interviews with Nancy conducted by Danielle Cohen-Levinas and Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki.

    • Social & political philosophy

      What Fanon Said

      A Philosophical Introduction to His Life and Thought

      by Lewis R. Gordon, Foreword by Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, Afterword by Drucilla Cornell

      Antiblack racism avows reason is white while emotion, and thus supposedly unreason, is black. Challenging academic adherence to this notion, Lewis R. Gordon offers a portrait of Martinican-turned-Algerian revolutionary psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon as an exemplar of “living thought” against forms of reason marked by colonialism and racism. Working from his own translations of the original French texts, Gordon critically engages everything in Fanon from dialectics, ethics, existentialism, and humanism to philosophical anthropology, phenomenology, and political theory as well as psychiatry and psychoanalysis. Gordon takes into account scholars from across the Global South to address controversies around Fanon’s writings on gender and sexuality as well as political violence and the social underclass. In doing so, he confronts the replication of a colonial and racist geography of reason, allowing theorists from the Global South to emerge as interlocutors alongside northern ones in a move that exemplifies what, Gordon argues, Fanon represented in his plea to establish newer and healthier human relationships beyond colonial paradigms.

    • Social & political philosophy

      What Fanon Said

      A Philosophical Introduction to His Life and Thought

      by Lewis R. Gordon, Foreword by Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, Afterword by Drucilla Cornell

      Antiblack racism avows reason is white while emotion, and thus supposedly unreason, is black. Challenging academic adherence to this notion, Lewis R. Gordon offers a portrait of Martinican-turned-Algerian revolutionary psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon as an exemplar of “living thought” against forms of reason marked by colonialism and racism. Working from his own translations of the original French texts, Gordon critically engages everything in Fanon from dialectics, ethics, existentialism, and humanism to philosophical anthropology, phenomenology, and political theory as well as psychiatry and psychoanalysis. Gordon takes into account scholars from across the Global South to address controversies around Fanon’s writings on gender and sexuality as well as political violence and the social underclass. In doing so, he confronts the replication of a colonial and racist geography of reason, allowing theorists from the Global South to emerge as interlocutors alongside northern ones in a move that exemplifies what, Gordon argues, Fanon represented in his plea to establish newer and healthier human relationships beyond colonial paradigms.

    • Social & political philosophy

      What Fanon Said

      A Philosophical Introduction to His Life and Thought

      by Lewis R. Gordon, Foreword by Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, Afterword by Drucilla Cornell

      Antiblack racism avows reason is white while emotion, and thus supposedly unreason, is black. Challenging academic adherence to this notion, Lewis R. Gordon offers a portrait of Martinican-turned-Algerian revolutionary psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon as an exemplar of “living thought” against forms of reason marked by colonialism and racism. Working from his own translations of the original French texts, Gordon critically engages everything in Fanon from dialectics, ethics, existentialism, and humanism to philosophical anthropology, phenomenology, and political theory as well as psychiatry and psychoanalysis. Gordon takes into account scholars from across the Global South to address controversies around Fanon’s writings on gender and sexuality as well as political violence and the social underclass. In doing so, he confronts the replication of a colonial and racist geography of reason, allowing theorists from the Global South to emerge as interlocutors alongside northern ones in a move that exemplifies what, Gordon argues, Fanon represented in his plea to establish newer and healthier human relationships beyond colonial paradigms.

    • Social & political philosophy

      What Fanon Said

      A Philosophical Introduction to His Life and Thought

      by Lewis R. Gordon, Foreword by Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, Afterword by Drucilla Cornell

      Antiblack racism avows reason is white while emotion, and thus supposedly unreason, is black. Challenging academic adherence to this notion, Lewis R. Gordon offers a portrait of Martinican-turned-Algerian revolutionary psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon as an exemplar of “living thought” against forms of reason marked by colonialism and racism. Working from his own translations of the original French texts, Gordon critically engages everything in Fanon from dialectics, ethics, existentialism, and humanism to philosophical anthropology, phenomenology, and political theory as well as psychiatry and psychoanalysis. Gordon takes into account scholars from across the Global South to address controversies around Fanon’s writings on gender and sexuality as well as political violence and the social underclass. In doing so, he confronts the replication of a colonial and racist geography of reason, allowing theorists from the Global South to emerge as interlocutors alongside northern ones in a move that exemplifies what, Gordon argues, Fanon represented in his plea to establish newer and healthier human relationships beyond colonial paradigms.

    • Social & political philosophy
      May 2011

      Politics and Metaphysics in Kant

      by Sorin Baiasu (Editor), Howard Williams (Editor), Sami Pihlström (Editor)

      The past three decades have witnessed the emergence, at the forefront of political thought, of several Kantian theories. Both the critical reaction to consequentialism inspired by Rawlsian constructivism and the universalism of more recent theories informed by Habermasian discourse ethics trace their main sources of inspiration back to Kant's writings. Yet much of what is Kantian in contemporary theory is formulated with more or less strict caveats concerning Kant's metaphysics. These range from radical claims that theories of justice must be political, not metaphysical, to more cautious calls for replacing Kant's metaphysics with a more modest ontology, for instance, one informed by the relatively recent linguistic turn in philosophy. The volume will consist of thirteen state-of-the-art essays which explore the relationship between politics and metaphysics in Kant and Kantian political philosophy. All essays will be published for the first time in this volume and will be preceded by an Introduction from the editors. Given the current legitimation crisisA" of modern liberal democracies, the purpose of the collection as a whole is to revisit the question concerning the role of metaphysics in moral and political philosophy and to suggest new perspectives on the question of legitimation.

    • Social & political philosophy
      April 2014

      Politics and Teleology in Kant

      by Tatiana Patrone, Paul Formosa, Avery Goldman (eds)

      This volume critically examines and elucidates the complex relationship between politics and teleology in Kant’s philosophical system. Examining this relationship is of key philosophical importance since Kant develops his political philosophy in the context of a teleological conception of the purposiveness of both nature and human history. Kant’s approach poses the dual task of reconciling his normative political theory with both his priori moral philosophy and his teleological philosophy of nature and human history. The fourteen essays in this volume, by leading scholars in the field, explore the relationship between teleology and politics from multiple perspectives. Together, the essays explore Kant’s normative political theory and legal philosophy, his cosmopolitanism and views on international relations, his theory of history, his theory of natural teleology, and the broader relationship between morality, history, nature and politics in Kant’s works. This important new volume will be of interest to a wide audience, including Kant scholars, scholars and students working on topics in moral and political philosophy, the philosophy of history, political theory and political science, legal scholars and international relations theorists, as well as those interested broadly in the history of ideas.

    • Social & political philosophy
      September 2014

      Nietzsche and Napoleon

      The Dionysian Conspiracy

      by Don Dombowsky

      This book argues that Nietzsche’s political thought and his own proposed model of governance is Bonapartist in conception: autocratic will in the guise of popular rule. Bonaparte is the model for the Nietzschean commander; not only his virtu, his ethics of martial valour, but his political institutions and techniques of power. Nietzsche understood that Napoleon manipulated the democratic process, abandoned the concept of popular sovereignty and undermined the principle of equality, that he was opposed to parliamentary politics but maintained their simulacra, a manoeuvre Nietzsche admired in respect of tactics. Nietzsche desired a revaluation of all values which endorsed many features of the Bonapartist regime. One can see Nietzsche not merely situated in the Napoleonic historiography of the cult of personality, but also situated ideologically in terms of a Napoleonic political policy and theory of government, in so far as he affirms certain political structures of the Napoleonic Empire. Nietzsche moves beyond the Napoleonic cult of personality to an analysis of the underlying structures of the Napoleonic empire. Nietzsche admires the ‘artist of government’ Napoleon (Napoleonic Caesarism) not only for his force of will but also for his political policies and tactics or political techniques.

    • Economic theory & philosophy
      July 2015

      Capitalism and Human Values

      by Wilkinson, Tony, A01

      In this book we construct a foundation for values based on our common humanity and explore personal, social and political values from a fresh perspective.

    • Social & political philosophy
      August 2015

      Social Radicalism and Liberal Education

      by Paterson, Lindsay, A01

      The book examines why social radicals supported liberal education, why they have moved away from it, and what the implications are for the future of an intellectually stimulating and culturally literate education.

    • Social & political philosophy
      January 2016

      John Dewey

      The global public and its problems

      by John Narayan

    • Social & political philosophy
      July 2013

      The Political Philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

      The Impossibilty of Reason

      by Matt Qvortrup

    • Social & political philosophy
      July 2013

      The Political Philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

      The Impossibilty of Reason

      by Matt Qvortrup

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