• Phenomenology & Existentialism
      September 2004

      Material Phenomenology

      Rebel Children and Their Families in South Carolina

      by Michel Henry, Translated by Scott Davidson

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      December 2009

      Questions of Phenomenology

      Language, Alterity, Temporality, Finitude

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier

      Françoise Dastur is well respected in France and Europe for her mastery of phenomenology as a movement and her clear and cogent explications of phenomenology in movement. These qualities are on display in this remarkable volume. _x000B__x000B_Dastur guides the reader through a series of phenomenological questions—language and logic, self and other, temporality and history, finitude and mortality—that also call phenomenology itself into question, testing its limits and pushing it in new directions. Like Merleau-Ponty, Dastur sees phenomenology not as a doctrine, a catalogue of concepts and catchphrases authored by a single thinker, but as a movement in which several thinkers participate, each inflecting the movement in unique ways. In this regard, Dastur is both one of the clearest guides to phenomenology and one of its ablest practitioners.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      December 2009

      Questions of Phenomenology

      Language, Alterity, Temporality, Finitude

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier

      Françoise Dastur is well respected in France and Europe for her mastery of phenomenology as a movement and her clear and cogent explications of phenomenology in movement. These qualities are on display in this remarkable volume. _x000B__x000B_Dastur guides the reader through a series of phenomenological questions—language and logic, self and other, temporality and history, finitude and mortality—that also call phenomenology itself into question, testing its limits and pushing it in new directions. Like Merleau-Ponty, Dastur sees phenomenology not as a doctrine, a catalogue of concepts and catchphrases authored by a single thinker, but as a movement in which several thinkers participate, each inflecting the movement in unique ways. In this regard, Dastur is both one of the clearest guides to phenomenology and one of its ablest practitioners.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      November 2008

      How Are We to Confront Death?

      An Introduction to Philosophy

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier, Foreword by David Farrell Krell

    • Philosophy of religion
      June 1997

      Rethinking God as Gift

      Marion, Derrida, and the Limits of Phenomenology

      by Robyn Horner

      Rethinking God as Gift is situated at the intersection of philosophy, critical theory and theology. The first sustained study of the work of Jean-Luc Marion in English, it offers a unique perspective on contemporary questions and their theological relevance. Taking its point of departure from the problem of the gift as articulated by Jacques Derrida, who argues that the conditions of possibility of the gift are also its conditions of impossibility, Horner pursues a series of questions concerning the nature of thought, the viability of phenomenology, and, most urgently, the possibility of grace. For Marion, phenomenology, as the thought of the given, offers a path for philosophy to proceed without being implicated in metaphysics. His retrieval of several important insights of Edmund Husserl, along with his reading of Martin Heidegger and Emmanuel Levinas, enables him to work out a phenomenology where even "impossible" phenomena such as revelation and the gift might be examined. In this important confrontation between Marion and Derrida issues vital to the negotiation of postmodern concerns in philosophy and theology emerge with vigour.;The careful elucidation of those issues in an interdisciplinary context, and the snapshot it provides of the state of contemporary debate, make Rethinking God as Gift an important contribution to theological and philosophical discussion.

    • Philosophy of religion
      June 1997

      Rethinking God as Gift

      Marion, Derrida, and the Limits of Phenomenology

      by Robyn Horner

      Rethinking God as Gift is situated at the intersection of philosophy, critical theory and theology. The first sustained study of the work of Jean-Luc Marion in English, it offers a unique perspective on contemporary questions and their theological relevance. Taking its point of departure from the problem of the gift as articulated by Jacques Derrida, who argues that the conditions of possibility of the gift are also its conditions of impossibility, Horner pursues a series of questions concerning the nature of thought, the viability of phenomenology, and, most urgently, the possibility of grace. For Marion, phenomenology, as the thought of the given, offers a path for philosophy to proceed without being implicated in metaphysics. His retrieval of several important insights of Edmund Husserl, along with his reading of Martin Heidegger and Emmanuel Levinas, enables him to work out a phenomenology where even "impossible" phenomena such as revelation and the gift might be examined. In this important confrontation between Marion and Derrida issues vital to the negotiation of postmodern concerns in philosophy and theology emerge with vigour.;The careful elucidation of those issues in an interdisciplinary context, and the snapshot it provides of the state of contemporary debate, make Rethinking God as Gift an important contribution to theological and philosophical discussion.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      December 1988

      Heidegger

      Through Phenomenology to Thought

      by William J. Richardson

      Richardson explores the famous turn (Kehre) in Heidegger's thought after "Being in Time" and demonstrates how this transformation was radical without amounting to a simple contradiction of his earlier views.;In a full account of the evolution of Heidegger's work as a whole, Richardson provides an illuminating account of both divergences and fundamental continuities in Heidegger's philosophy, especially in light of recently published works.;Including as a preface the letter that Heidegger wrote to Richardson and a new introduction by the author, this book remains a useful guide to the philosophy of Heidegger.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      April 2005

      Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy

      Culture, Politics, and the Animality of the Human Being

      by Vanessa Lemm

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      November 2008

      How Are We to Confront Death?

      An Introduction to Philosophy

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier, Foreword by David Farrell Krell

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      March 2001

      Phenomenology "Wide Open"

      After the French Debate

      by Dominique Janicaud, Translated by Charles N. Cabral

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      January 2006

      Words of Life

      New Theological Turns in French Phenomenology

      by Edited by Bruce Ellis Benson, and Norman Wirzba

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      January 2006

      Words of Life

      New Theological Turns in French Phenomenology

      by Edited by Bruce Ellis Benson, and Norman Wirzba

    • Philosophy
      May 2007

      Phenomenologies of the Stranger

      Between Hostility and Hospitality

      by Edited by Richard Kearney, and Kascha Semonovitch

    • Psychology: emotions
      April 2009

      The Corporeal Turn

      An interdisciplinary reader

      by Sheets-Johnson, Maxine

      The purpose of The Corporeal Turn is to document in a single text the impressive array of investigations possible with respect to the body and bodily life, and to show that, whatever the specific topic being examined, it is a matter of fathoming and...

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism

      Quiet Powers of the Possible

      Interviews in Contemporary French Phenomenology

      by Tarek R. Dika, and W. Chris Hackett, Foreword by Richard Kearney

      Quiet Powers of the Possible offers an excellent introduction to contemporary French phenomenology through a series of interviews with its most prominent figures. Guided by rigorous questions that push into the most important aspects of the latest phenomenological research, the book gives readers a comprehensive sense of each thinker’s intellectual history, motivations, and philosophical commitments. The book introduces readers to debates that have not previously been accessible to the English-speaking world, such as the growing interest in the phenomenological concept of life in its affective and even vital dimensions, the emerging dialogue with the analytic philosophy of mind and language, and reassessments of the so-called theological turn. The diversity of approaches collected here has its origin in a deeper debate about the conceptual and historical foundations of phenomenology itself. In this way the book offers the most accessible and wide-ranging introduction to French phenomenology to have appeared in the English-speaking world to date.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism

      Quiet Powers of the Possible

      Interviews in Contemporary French Phenomenology

      by Tarek R. Dika, and W. Chris Hackett, Foreword by Richard Kearney

      Quiet Powers of the Possible offers an excellent introduction to contemporary French phenomenology through a series of interviews with its most prominent figures. Guided by rigorous questions that push into the most important aspects of the latest phenomenological research, the book gives readers a comprehensive sense of each thinker’s intellectual history, motivations, and philosophical commitments. The book introduces readers to debates that have not previously been accessible to the English-speaking world, such as the growing interest in the phenomenological concept of life in its affective and even vital dimensions, the emerging dialogue with the analytic philosophy of mind and language, and reassessments of the so-called theological turn. The diversity of approaches collected here has its origin in a deeper debate about the conceptual and historical foundations of phenomenology itself. In this way the book offers the most accessible and wide-ranging introduction to French phenomenology to have appeared in the English-speaking world to date.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism

      Quiet Powers of the Possible

      Interviews in Contemporary French Phenomenology

      by Tarek R. Dika, and W. Chris Hackett, Foreword by Richard Kearney

      Quiet Powers of the Possible offers an excellent introduction to contemporary French phenomenology through a series of interviews with its most prominent figures. Guided by rigorous questions that push into the most important aspects of the latest phenomenological research, the book gives readers a comprehensive sense of each thinker’s intellectual history, motivations, and philosophical commitments. The book introduces readers to debates that have not previously been accessible to the English-speaking world, such as the growing interest in the phenomenological concept of life in its affective and even vital dimensions, the emerging dialogue with the analytic philosophy of mind and language, and reassessments of the so-called theological turn. The diversity of approaches collected here has its origin in a deeper debate about the conceptual and historical foundations of phenomenology itself. In this way the book offers the most accessible and wide-ranging introduction to French phenomenology to have appeared in the English-speaking world to date.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism

      Quiet Powers of the Possible

      Interviews in Contemporary French Phenomenology

      by Tarek R. Dika, and W. Chris Hackett, Foreword by Richard Kearney

      Quiet Powers of the Possible offers an excellent introduction to contemporary French phenomenology through a series of interviews with its most prominent figures. Guided by rigorous questions that push into the most important aspects of the latest phenomenological research, the book gives readers a comprehensive sense of each thinker’s intellectual history, motivations, and philosophical commitments. The book introduces readers to debates that have not previously been accessible to the English-speaking world, such as the growing interest in the phenomenological concept of life in its affective and even vital dimensions, the emerging dialogue with the analytic philosophy of mind and language, and reassessments of the so-called theological turn. The diversity of approaches collected here has its origin in a deeper debate about the conceptual and historical foundations of phenomenology itself. In this way the book offers the most accessible and wide-ranging introduction to French phenomenology to have appeared in the English-speaking world to date.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism

      Temporality and Trinity

      by Peter Manchester

      Temporality and Trinity argues that there is deep homology between the roles of temporal problematic in Augustine’s On Trinity and Heidegger’s Being and Time. Although Heidegger was aware of On Trinity, the claim is not that he writes under its influence. Rather, Manchester moves from the temporal problematic of Being and Time to the psychological explication of the human image of God in On Trinity, schematized as memory, understanding, and will. Formal and phenomenological parallels allow interpretation of that psychological triad as a temporal problematic in the manner of Being and Time. In a sense, this is to read Augustine as influenced by Heidegger. But the aim is more constructive than that. Establishing a link between trinitarian theology and Being and Time opens a more direct way of benefiting from it in theology than Heidegger’s own assumptions. It puts philosophy in a position to confront New Testament theology directly, in its own historicality, without digression into anything like philosophy of religion.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism

      Temporality and Trinity

      by Peter Manchester

      Temporality and Trinity argues that there is deep homology between the roles of temporal problematic in Augustine’s On Trinity and Heidegger’s Being and Time. Although Heidegger was aware of On Trinity, the claim is not that he writes under its influence. Rather, Manchester moves from the temporal problematic of Being and Time to the psychological explication of the human image of God in On Trinity, schematized as memory, understanding, and will. Formal and phenomenological parallels allow interpretation of that psychological triad as a temporal problematic in the manner of Being and Time. In a sense, this is to read Augustine as influenced by Heidegger. But the aim is more constructive than that. Establishing a link between trinitarian theology and Being and Time opens a more direct way of benefiting from it in theology than Heidegger’s own assumptions. It puts philosophy in a position to confront New Testament theology directly, in its own historicality, without digression into anything like philosophy of religion.

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