• Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Deutsche Ideologie. Zur Kritik der Philosophie

      Manuskripte in chronologischer Anordnung

      by Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Gerald Hubmann, Ulrich Pagel

      Die Manuskripte von Marx und Engels zur Kritik der Deutschen Ideologie sind fragmentarisch geblieben. Die vorliegende Ausgabe präsentiert sie in zentralen Auszügen und chronologisch geordnet. Damit erlaubt sie einen aufschlussreichen ‚Blick in die Werkstatt‘. Im Zuge der grundsätzlichen Kritik an der deutschen Philosophie und am deutschen Sozialismus entwickeln Marx und Engels den eigenen terminologischen und theoretischen Rahmen: Begriffe differenzieren sich aus, Manuskriptfragmente über Arbeitsteilung sowie das Verhältnis von Sein und Bewusstsein entstehen. Die Texte werden hier auf der Grundlage der historisch-kritischen Edition in der Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA) in chronologischer Anordnung wiedergegeben und durch wichtige Textvarianten ergänzt. Beigegebene Manuskriptseiten im Faksimile-Druck zeigen die intensive gemeinsame Arbeit von Marx und Engels, ebenso aber auch den Entwurfscharakter und den schlechten Erhaltungszustand vieler Manuskripte.

    • Literature: history & criticism
      September 1999

      Beginning Postmodernism

      by Tim Woods

      The first volume of Manchester University Press' 'Beginnings' series, which is based on Peter Barry's critically aclaimed bestseller, Beginning theoryThis brilliant digest offers a clear, step-by-step introduction to postmodernism on every discourse a. . . .

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      December 1988

      The Difference of Man and the Difference It Makes

      by Mortimer J. Adler

      In this work, Adler explores how human beings differ from all other things in the universe. He brings to bear both philosophical insight and informed scientific hypotheses concerning the biological and behavioural characteristics of humankind. Rapid advances in science and technology, and the abstract concepts of that influence on man and human value systems, are outlined by Adler, as he touches on the effect of industrialization and the clash of cultures and value systems brought about by increased communication between previously isolated groups of people.;Among the other issues this study addresses are the scientific achievements in biology and physics which have raised fundamental questions about humanity's essential nature, especially the discoveries in the biological relatedness of all living things. Thrown into high relief is humanity's struggle to determine its unique status in the natural world and its value in the world it has created.;Ultimately, Adler's work develops an approach to the separation between scientific and philosophical questions which stands as a model of thought on philosophical consideration of new scientific discoveries and its consequences for the human person.

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      August 1997

      The Question of German Guilt

      by Karl Jaspers

      In the years after the Nazi government fell, a philosophy professor at Hindenberg University lectured on a subject which burned the consciousness and conscience of thinking Germans. "Are the German people guilty?". These lectures by Karl Jaspers, a European philosopher, attracted wide attention among German intellectuals and students; they seemed to offer a path to sanity and morality in a disordered world.;Jaspers, a life-long liberal, has attempted in this book to discuss rationally a problem that has thus far evoked only heat and fury. Neither an evasive apology nor a wholesome condemnation, this book distinguishes between types of guilt and degrees of responsibility. He lists four categories of guilt: criminal guilt (the commitment of overt acts), political guilt (the degree of political acquiescence in the Nazi regime), moral guilt (a matter of private judgement among one's friends), and metaphysical guilt (a universally shared responsibility of those who chose to remain alive rather than die in protest againt Nazi atrocities).;Born in 1883, Karl Jaspers took his degree in medicine but soon became interested in psychiatry. He is the author of a standard work of psychopathology, as well as special studies on Strindberg, Van Gogh and Nietszche. After World War I he became Professor of Philosophy at Heidelberg wher he achieved fame as a brilliant teacher and an early exponent of existentialism. He was among the first to acquaint German readers with the works of Kierkegaard.;Jaspers had to resign from his post in 1935. From the total isolation into which the Hitler regime forced him, Jaspers returned in 1945 to a position of central intellectual leadership of the younger liberal elements of Germany. In his first lecture in 1945, he forcefuly reminded his audience of the fate of the German Jews. Jaspers' unblemished record as an anti-Nazi has made him a rallying point centre for those of his countrymen who wish to reconstruct a free and democratic Germany.

    • Semantics
      April 1997

      The Intrigue of Ethics

      A Reading of the Idea of Discourse in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas

      by Jeffrey Dudiak

    • Western philosophy: c 1600 to c 1900
      February 2001

      The Basic Writings of Josiah Royce, Volume I

      Culture, Philosophy, and Religion

      by Edited by John J. McDermott

      Now back in print, and in paperback, these two classic volumes illustrate the scope and quality of Royce's thought, providing the most comprehensive selection of his writings currently available. They offer a detailed presentation of the viable relationship Royce forged between the local experience of community and the demands of a philosophical and scientific vision of the human situation. The selections reprinted here are basic to any understanding of Royce's thought and its pressing relevance to contemporary cultural, moral, and religious issues.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      September 2004

      Material Phenomenology

      Rebel Children and Their Families in South Carolina

      by Michel Henry, Translated by Scott Davidson

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      December 2009

      Questions of Phenomenology

      Language, Alterity, Temporality, Finitude

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier

      Françoise Dastur is well respected in France and Europe for her mastery of phenomenology as a movement and her clear and cogent explications of phenomenology in movement. These qualities are on display in this remarkable volume. _x000B__x000B_Dastur guides the reader through a series of phenomenological questions—language and logic, self and other, temporality and history, finitude and mortality—that also call phenomenology itself into question, testing its limits and pushing it in new directions. Like Merleau-Ponty, Dastur sees phenomenology not as a doctrine, a catalogue of concepts and catchphrases authored by a single thinker, but as a movement in which several thinkers participate, each inflecting the movement in unique ways. In this regard, Dastur is both one of the clearest guides to phenomenology and one of its ablest practitioners.

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      December 2009

      Questions of Phenomenology

      Language, Alterity, Temporality, Finitude

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier

      Françoise Dastur is well respected in France and Europe for her mastery of phenomenology as a movement and her clear and cogent explications of phenomenology in movement. These qualities are on display in this remarkable volume. _x000B__x000B_Dastur guides the reader through a series of phenomenological questions—language and logic, self and other, temporality and history, finitude and mortality—that also call phenomenology itself into question, testing its limits and pushing it in new directions. Like Merleau-Ponty, Dastur sees phenomenology not as a doctrine, a catalogue of concepts and catchphrases authored by a single thinker, but as a movement in which several thinkers participate, each inflecting the movement in unique ways. In this regard, Dastur is both one of the clearest guides to phenomenology and one of its ablest practitioners.

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      March 2008

      Conversations on Peirce

      Reals and Ideals

      by Douglas R. Anderson, and Carl R. Hausman

    • Phenomenology & Existentialism
      November 2008

      How Are We to Confront Death?

      An Introduction to Philosophy

      by Françoise Dastur, Translated by Robert Vallier, Foreword by David Farrell Krell

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      December 1977

      Teilhard's Vision of the Past

      The Making of a Method

      by Robert J. O’Connell

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      December 1988

      The Difference of Man and the Difference It Makes

      by John K. Stutterheim, Foreword by Mark Parillo

      In this work, Adler explores how human beings differ from all other things in the universe. He brings to bear both philosophical insight and informed scientific hypotheses concerning the biological and behavioural characteristics of humankind. Rapid advances in science and technology, and the abstract concepts of that influence on man and human value systems, are outlined by Adler, as he touches on the effect of industrialization and the clash of cultures and value systems brought about by increased communication between previously isolated groups of people.;Among the other issues this study addresses are the scientific achievements in biology and physics which have raised fundamental questions about humanity's essential nature, especially the discoveries in the biological relatedness of all living things. Thrown into high relief is humanity's struggle to determine its unique status in the natural world and its value in the world it has created.;Ultimately, Adler's work develops an approach to the separation between scientific and philosophical questions which stands as a model of thought on philosophical consideration of new scientific discoveries and its consequences for the human person.

    • Philosophy: metaphysics & ontology
      December 1995

      Emmanuel Levinas

      The Problem of Ethical Metaphysics

      by Edith Wyschogrod

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      December 1995

      The Face of the Other and the Trace of God

      Essays on the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas

      by Jeffrey Bloechl

    • Social, group or collective psychology
      August 1997

      The Question of German Guilt

      The New Media and the Markle Foundation

      by Karl Jaspers

      In the years after the Nazi government fell, a philosophy professor at Hindenberg University lectured on a subject which burned the consciousness and conscience of thinking Germans. "Are the German people guilty?". These lectures by Karl Jaspers, a European philosopher, attracted wide attention among German intellectuals and students; they seemed to offer a path to sanity and morality in a disordered world.;Jaspers, a life-long liberal, has attempted in this book to discuss rationally a problem that has thus far evoked only heat and fury. Neither an evasive apology nor a wholesome condemnation, this book distinguishes between types of guilt and degrees of responsibility. He lists four categories of guilt: criminal guilt (the commitment of overt acts), political guilt (the degree of political acquiescence in the Nazi regime), moral guilt (a matter of private judgement among one's friends), and metaphysical guilt (a universally shared responsibility of those who chose to remain alive rather than die in protest againt Nazi atrocities).;Born in 1883, Karl Jaspers took his degree in medicine but soon became interested in psychiatry. He is the author of a standard work of psychopathology, as well as special studies on Strindberg, Van Gogh and Nietszche. After World War I he became Professor of Philosophy at Heidelberg wher he achieved fame as a brilliant teacher and an early exponent of existentialism. He was among the first to acquaint German readers with the works of Kierkegaard.;Jaspers had to resign from his post in 1935. From the total isolation into which the Hitler regime forced him, Jaspers returned in 1945 to a position of central intellectual leadership of the younger liberal elements of Germany. In his first lecture in 1945, he forcefuly reminded his audience of the fate of the German Jews. Jaspers' unblemished record as an anti-Nazi has made him a rallying point centre for those of his countrymen who wish to reconstruct a free and democratic Germany.

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      September 2000

      Experience and the Absolute

      Disputed Questions On the Humanity of Man

      by Jean-Yves Lacoste, Translated by Mark Raftery-Skehan

      Does the philosophy of Heidegger represent the emergence of a secular anthropology that requires religious thought to redefine the religious dimension in human existence? In this critical response, Lacoste confronts the ultimate definition of human nature, the humanity of the human. He explores that definition through an analysis of the "absolute" as a phenomenological datum. Lacoste establishes a conception of human nature that opens possibilities for religious experience and religious identity in view of Heidegger's profound challenge. He develops a phenomenology of the liturgy, and subjects the categories of "experience," "place," and "human existence" to careful examination. Making a strong case for the affective nature of religious experience, he sides with Schleiermacher against Hegel in associating religion with affectivity rather than logic. Such affectivity, he claims, can be more rational than reason as framed in Hegelian logic.

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      April 2001

      Targets of Opportunity

      On the Militarization of Thinking

      by Samuel Weber

      The title of this book echoes a phrase used by the Washington Post to describe the American attempt to kill Saddam Hussein at the start of the war against Iraq. Its theme is the notion of targeting (skopos) as the name of an intentional structure in which the subject tries to confirm its invulnerability by aiming to destroy a target. At the center of the first chapter is Odysseus's killing of the suitors; the second concerns Carl Schmitt's Roman Catholicism and Political Form; the third and fourth treat Freud's "Thoughts for the Times on War and Death" and "The Man Moses and Monotheistic Religion." Weber then traces the emergence of an alternative to targeting, first within military and strategic thinking itself ("Network Centered Warfare"), and then in Walter Benjamin's readings of "Capitalism as Religion" and "Two Poems of Friedrich Holderlin."

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      June 2004

      Noli me tangere

      On the Raising of the Body

      by Jean-Luc Nancy, Translated by Sarah Clift, Pascale-Anne Brault, and Michael Naas

    • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -
      September 2005

      The Fall of Sleep

      by Jean-Luc Nancy, Translated by Charlotte Mandell

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