• Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600
      May 2019

      The Singular Voice of Being

      John Duns Scotus and Ultimate Difference

      by Andrew T. LaZella, Gyula Klima

      The Singular Voice of Being reconsiders John Duns Scotus’s well-studied theory of the univocity of being in light of his less explored discussions of ultimate difference. Ultimate difference is a notion introduced by Aristotle and known by the Aristotelian tradition, but one that, this book argues, Scotus radically retrofits to buttress his doctrine of univocity. Scotus broadens ultimate difference to include not only specific differences, but also intrinsic modes of being (e.g., finite/infinite) and principles of individuation (i.e., haecceitates). Furthermore, he deepens it by divorcing it from anything with categorical classification, such as substantial form. Scotus uses his revamped notion of ultimate difference as a means of dividing being, despite the longstanding Parmenidean arguments against such division. The book highlights the unique role of difference in Scotus’s thought, which conceives of difference not as a fall from the perfect unity of being but rather as a perfective determination of an otherwise indifferent concept. The division of being culminates in individuation as the final degree of perfection, which constitutes indivisible (i.e., singular) degrees of being. This systematic study of ultimate difference opens new dimensions for understanding Scotus’s dense thought with respect to not only univocity, but also to individuation, cognition, and acts of the will.

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy

      by Edited by Gyula Klima

      It is commonly supposed that certain elements of medieval philosophy are uncharacteristically preserved in modern philosophical thought through the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their intrinsic directedness toward some object. The many exceptions to this presumption, however, threaten its viability. This volume explores the intricacies and varieties of the conceptual relationships medieval thinkers developed among intentionality, cognition, and mental representation. Ranging from Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, and Buridan through less-familiar writers, the collection sheds new light on the various strands that run between medieval and modern thought and bring us to a number of fundamental questions in the philosophy of mind as it is conceived today.

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy

      by Edited by Gyula Klima

      It is commonly supposed that certain elements of medieval philosophy are uncharacteristically preserved in modern philosophical thought through the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their intrinsic directedness toward some object. The many exceptions to this presumption, however, threaten its viability. This volume explores the intricacies and varieties of the conceptual relationships medieval thinkers developed among intentionality, cognition, and mental representation. Ranging from Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, and Buridan through less-familiar writers, the collection sheds new light on the various strands that run between medieval and modern thought and bring us to a number of fundamental questions in the philosophy of mind as it is conceived today.

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy

      by Edited by Gyula Klima

      It is commonly supposed that certain elements of medieval philosophy are uncharacteristically preserved in modern philosophical thought through the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their intrinsic directedness toward some object. The many exceptions to this presumption, however, threaten its viability. This volume explores the intricacies and varieties of the conceptual relationships medieval thinkers developed among intentionality, cognition, and mental representation. Ranging from Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, and Buridan through less-familiar writers, the collection sheds new light on the various strands that run between medieval and modern thought and bring us to a number of fundamental questions in the philosophy of mind as it is conceived today.

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy

      by Edited by Gyula Klima

      It is commonly supposed that certain elements of medieval philosophy are uncharacteristically preserved in modern philosophical thought through the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their intrinsic directedness toward some object. The many exceptions to this presumption, however, threaten its viability. This volume explores the intricacies and varieties of the conceptual relationships medieval thinkers developed among intentionality, cognition, and mental representation. Ranging from Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, and Buridan through less-familiar writers, the collection sheds new light on the various strands that run between medieval and modern thought and bring us to a number of fundamental questions in the philosophy of mind as it is conceived today.

    • Fiction
      October 2011

      Song at Dawn

      1150 in Provence

      by Jean Gill

      Winner of the Global Ebooks Award for Best Historical Fiction - a medieval thriller/romanceBook 1 in the Troubadours Series 1150 in Provence, where love and marriage are as divided as Christian and Muslim. A historical thriller set in Narbonne just after the Second Crusade. On the run from abuse, Estela wakes in a ditch with only her lute, her amazing voice, and a dagger hidden in her petticoats. Her talent finds a patron in Alienor of Aquitaine and more than a music tutor in the Queen's finest troubadour and Commander of the Guard, Dragonetz los Pros. Weary of war, Dragonetz uses Jewish money and Moorish expertise to build that most modern of inventions, a papermill, arousing the wrath of the Church. Their enemies gather, ready to light the political and religious powder-keg of medieval Narbonne. Watch the trailer youtube.com/watch?v=XZvFmOkD6Pc

    • Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700

      The Renaissance

      by Walter Pater (author)

      Text difficulty between popular and professional readers For English major and learners at intermediate and advanced levels Based on classic works, involving various fields of social sciences, adopting a bilingual format, providing cultural annotations Selected works of various subjects and styles, some being witty and humorous and some being sarcastic and heuristic

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Mental Language

      From Plato to William of Ockham

      by Claude Panaccio, Translated by Joshua P. Hochschild, and Meredith K. Ziebart

      The notion that human thought is structured like a language, with a precise syntax and semantics, has been pivotal in recent philosophy of mind. Yet it is not a new idea: it was systematically explored in the fourteenth century by William of Ockham and became central in late medieval philosophy. Mental Language examines the background of Ockham's innovation by tracing the history of the mental language theme in ancient and medieval thought._x000B__x000B_Panaccio identifies two important traditions: one philosophical, stemming from Plato and Aristotle, and the other theological, rooted in the Fathers of the Christian Church. The study then focuses on the merging of the two traditions in the Middle Ages, as they gave rise to detailed discussions over the structure of human thought and its relations with signs and language. Ultimately, Panaccio stresses the originality and significance of Ockham's doctrine of the oratio mentalis (mental discourse) and the strong impression it made upon his immediate successors._x000B_

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Mental Language

      From Plato to William of Ockham

      by Claude Panaccio, Translated by Joshua P. Hochschild, and Meredith K. Ziebart

      The notion that human thought is structured like a language, with a precise syntax and semantics, has been pivotal in recent philosophy of mind. Yet it is not a new idea: it was systematically explored in the fourteenth century by William of Ockham and became central in late medieval philosophy. Mental Language examines the background of Ockham's innovation by tracing the history of the mental language theme in ancient and medieval thought._x000B__x000B_Panaccio identifies two important traditions: one philosophical, stemming from Plato and Aristotle, and the other theological, rooted in the Fathers of the Christian Church. The study then focuses on the merging of the two traditions in the Middle Ages, as they gave rise to detailed discussions over the structure of human thought and its relations with signs and language. Ultimately, Panaccio stresses the originality and significance of Ockham's doctrine of the oratio mentalis (mental discourse) and the strong impression it made upon his immediate successors._x000B_

    • Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600

      Mental Language

      From Plato to William of Ockham

      by Claude Panaccio, Translated by Joshua P. Hochschild, and Meredith K. Ziebart

      The notion that human thought is structured like a language, with a precise syntax and semantics, has been pivotal in recent philosophy of mind. Yet it is not a new idea: it was systematically explored in the fourteenth century by William of Ockham and became central in late medieval philosophy. Mental Language examines the background of Ockham's innovation by tracing the history of the mental language theme in ancient and medieval thought._x000B__x000B_Panaccio identifies two important traditions: one philosophical, stemming from Plato and Aristotle, and the other theological, rooted in the Fathers of the Christian Church. The study then focuses on the merging of the two traditions in the Middle Ages, as they gave rise to detailed discussions over the structure of human thought and its relations with signs and language. Ultimately, Panaccio stresses the originality and significance of Ockham's doctrine of the oratio mentalis (mental discourse) and the strong impression it made upon his immediate successors._x000B_

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      John of Salisbury and the medieval Roman renaissance

      by Irene O'Daly, Steve Rigby

      This book is a detailed but accessible treatment of the political thought of John of Salisbury. It shows how aspects of his thought - such as his views on political cooperation and virtuous rulership - were inspired by the writings of Roman philosophers, notably Cicero and Seneca. Investigating how John accessed and adapted the classics, the book argues that he developed a hybrid political philosophy by taking elements from Roman Stoic sources and combining them with insights from patristic writings. By situating his ideas in their political and intellectual context, it offers a reassessment of John's political thought, as well as a case study in classical reception, of relevance to students and scholars of political philosophy and the history of ideas.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      John of Salisbury and the medieval Roman renaissance

      by Irene O'Daly, Steve Rigby

      This book is a detailed but accessible treatment of the political thought of John of Salisbury. It shows how aspects of his thought - such as his views on political cooperation and virtuous rulership - were inspired by the writings of Roman philosophers, notably Cicero and Seneca. Investigating how John accessed and adapted the classics, the book argues that he developed a hybrid political philosophy by taking elements from Roman Stoic sources and combining them with insights from patristic writings. By situating his ideas in their political and intellectual context, it offers a reassessment of John's political thought, as well as a case study in classical reception, of relevance to students and scholars of political philosophy and the history of ideas.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      John of Salisbury and the medieval Roman renaissance

      by Irene O'Daly, Steve Rigby

      This book is a detailed but accessible treatment of the political thought of John of Salisbury. It shows how aspects of his thought - such as his views on political cooperation and virtuous rulership - were inspired by the writings of Roman philosophers, notably Cicero and Seneca. Investigating how John accessed and adapted the classics, the book argues that he developed a hybrid political philosophy by taking elements from Roman Stoic sources and combining them with insights from patristic writings. By situating his ideas in their political and intellectual context, it offers a reassessment of John's political thought, as well as a case study in classical reception, of relevance to students and scholars of political philosophy and the history of ideas.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Singleness

      Self-Individuation and Its Rejection in the Scholastic Debate on Principles of Individuation

      by Michal Glowala

      Die Reihe bietet ein Publikationsforum für innovative Arbeiten zu allen Themengebieten der analytischen Philosophie. Die Bände in dieser Reihe erscheinen in deutscher oder englischer Sprache.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      René Descartes: Meditationen über die Erste Philosophie

      by Andreas Kemmerling

      Die „Meditationen“ sind ohne Zweifel ein Meilenstein und ein Meisterwerk des abendländischen Denkens. Durch sie wurde Descartes zum ,Vater der modernen Philosophie‘ – und die Erkenntnistheorie auf Jahrhunderte zu deren Fundamentaldisziplin. Bis heute eignet sich kaum ein anderes epochemachendes Werk besser dazu, in der Auseinandersetzung mit den Argumentationsgängen eines Klassikers selbst zu erfahren, was philosophisches Denken ist – und wie es geht. Die neun Kapitel dieses Kommentars sind Originalbeiträge. Sie sollen Studierende und Dozenten bei der Lektüre begleiten und dazu beitragen, das intellektuelle Vergnügen an der Tiefe (und auch Schönheit) der „Meditationen“ noch zu steigern. Mit Beiträgen von: Lilli Alanen, Gary Hatfield, Andreas Hüttemann, Andreas Kemmerling, Tobias Rosefeldt, Andreas Schmidt und Hans-Peter Schütt.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      July 2018

      So What's New About Scholasticism?

      How Neo-Thomism Helped Shape the Twentieth Century

      by Rajesh Heynickx, Stéphane Symons, Samuel O'Connor Perks

      In So What’s New about Scholasticism? thirteen international scholars gauge the extraordinary impact of a religiously inspired conceptual framework in a modern society. The essays that are brought together in this volume reveal that Neo-Thomism became part of contingent social contexts and varying intellectual domains. Rather than an ecclesiastic project of like-minded believers, Neo-Thomism was put into place as a source of inspiration for various concepts of modernization and progress. This volume reconstructs how Neo-Thomism sought to resolve disparities, annul contradictions and reconcile incongruent, new developments. It asks the question why Neo-Thomist ideas and arguments were put into play and how they were transferred across various scientific disciplines and artistic media, growing into one of the most influential master-narratives of the twentieth century. Edward Baring, Dries Bosschaert, James Chappel, Adi Efal-Lautenschläger, Rajesh Heynickx, Sigrid Leyssen, Christopher Morrissey, Annette Mülberger, Jaume Navarro, Herman Paul, Karim Schelkens, Wim Weymans and John Carter Wood reconstruct a bewildering, yet decipherable thought-structure that has left a deep mark on twentieth century politics, philosophy, science and religion.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      July 2018

      Eigentum als ein subjektives Recht bei Luis de Molina (1535–1600)

      Dominium und Sklaverei in De Iustitia et Iure

      by Danaë Simmermacher

      Der spanische Jesuit Luis de Molina (1535-1600) zählt zu den wichtigsten Autoren der "Schule von Salamanca". Die Autorin untersucht erstmalig den Zusammenhang von rechtsmetaphysischen und rechtspraktischen Fragestellungen bei Molina. Durch die Verknüpfung seiner Willensmetaphysik ("Concordia", 1588) und Rechtslehre ("De Iustitia et Iure", 1593-1609) wird anhand der Sklavenproblematik die Interpretation des subjektiven Rechts avant la lettre begründet. Im Zentrum der Untersuchung stehen die Grundbegriffe Ius (Recht) und Dominium (Eigentum, Herrschaft). Molina benennt in "De Iustitia et Iure" explizit ein "ius qua homo et qua proximo" und spricht auch Sklaven das Dominium zu, da sie durch die Sklaverei nicht ihre Willensfreiheit verlieren. Sklaven nehmen in Molinas Konzept damit einen sensiblen Sonderstatus zwischen Rechtssubjekt und Rechtsobjekt ein. Die Rechte "qua homo" dürfen deshalb nicht mit den Menschenrechten verwechselt werden, doch Molina begründet so, welche Elementarrechte jemandem zukommen, der grundsätzlich als Träger von Rechten anerkannt wird.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science

      From Regius to ‘s Gravesande

      by Andrea Strazzoni

      How did the relations between philosophy and science evolve during the 17th and the 18th century? This book analyzes this issue by considering the history of Cartesianism in Dutch universities, as well as its legacy in the 18th century. It takes into account the ways in which the disciplines of logic and metaphysics became functional to the justification and reflection on the conceptual premises and the methods of natural philosophy, changing their traditional roles as art of reasoning and as science of being. This transformation took place as a result of two factors. First, logic and metaphysics (which included rational theology) were used to grant the status of indubitable knowledge of natural philosophy. Second, the debates internal to Cartesianism, as well as the emergence of alternative philosophical world-views (such as those of Hobbes, Spinoza, the experimental science and Newtonianism) progressively deprived such disciplines of their foundational function, and they started to become forms of reflection over given scientific practices, either Cartesian, experimental, or Newtonian.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2018

      Leibniz und Guericke im Diskurs

      Das Exzerpt aus den Experimenta Nova und der Briefwechsel

      by Otto Guericke, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Berthold Heinecke, Wolfram Knapp, Paolo Rubini, Peter Streitenberger, Paolo Rubini

      Durch die Akademieausgabe von Leibniz' Schriften werden nach und nach viele Dokumente allgemein zugänglich, die bisher in der Leibniz-Forschung wenig Berücksichtigung fanden. Dazu gehören insbesondere auch die naturwissenschaftlichen, medizinischen und technischen Schriften, die in der Reihe VIII der Edition präsentiert werden. Ein erster Teilband, der die Jahre 1668 bis 1676 umfasst, wurde 2009 veröffentlicht. Hierin sind auch die Dokumente enthalten, in denen sich Leibniz mit den 1672 erschienenen Experimenta Nova Magdeburgica Otto von Guerickes auseinandersetzt. Da Guerickes Werk nicht nur die berühmten Vakuumexperimente umfasst, sondern sich ausgehend von den Experimenten als großangelegtes Kompendium zur zeitgenössischen Astronomie versteht, werden in dem hier erstmalig in deutscher Übersetzung präsentierten Exzerpt viele seinerzeit aktuelle physikalische Fragen berührt. Die Übersetzung wird ergänzt durch textkritische und inhaltliche Anmerkungen, eine ausführliche Einleitung und den Briefwechsel zwischen Guericke und Leibniz.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 1993

      Leibniz und seine Akademie

      Ausgewählte Quellen zur Geschichte der Berliner Sozietät der Wissenschaften 1697–1716

      by Hans-Stephan Brather

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