• General & world history

      A Greater Love

      by Olga Watkins

      The true story of a woman's incredible journey into the heart of the Third Reich to find the man she loves. When the Gestapo seize 20-year-old Olga Czepf's fiance she is determined to find him and sets off on an extraordinary 2,000-mile search across Nazi-occupied Europe risking betrayal, arrest and death. As the Second World War heads towards its bloody climax, she refuses to give up - even when her mission leads her to the gates of Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps... Now 89 and living in London, Olga tells with remarkable clarity of the courage and determination that drove her across war-torn Europe, to find the man she loved. The greatest untold true love story of World War Two.

    • Land forces & warfare

      Command Culture

      Officer Education in the U.s. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War Ii

      by JÞorg Muth

      In Command Culture, Joerg Muth examines the different paths the United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before World War II. Muth demonstrates that the military education system in Germany represented an organized effort where each school and examination provided the stepping stone for the next. But in the United States, there existed no communication about teaching contents or didactical matters among the various schools and academies, and they existed in a self chosen insular environment. American officers who finally made their way through an erratic selection process and past West Point to the important Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, found themselves usually deeply disappointed, because they were faced again with a rather below average faculty who forced them after every exercise to accept the approved "school solution." Command Culture explores the paradox that in Germany officers came from a closed authoritarian society but received an extremely open minded military education, whereas their counterparts in the United States came from one of the most democratic societies but received an outdated military education that harnessed their minds and limited their initiative. On the other hand, German officer candidates learned that in war everything is possible and a war of extermination acceptable. For American officers, raised in a democracy, certain boundaries could never be crossed. This work for the first time clearly explains the lack of audacity of many high ranking American officers during World War II, as well as the reason why so many German officers became perpetrators or accomplices of war crimes and atrocities or remained bystanders without speaking up. Those American officers who became outstanding leaders in World War II did so not so much because of their military education, but despite it.

    • Historical fiction
      June 2013

      Across Great Divides

      by Monique Roy

      Across Great Divides is a timeless story of the upheavals of war, the power of family, and the resiliency of human spirit. When Hitler came to power in 1933, one Jewish family refused to be destroyed and defied the Nazis only to come up against another struggle—confronting apartheid in South Africa. The novel chronicles the story of Eva and Inge, two identical twin sisters growing up in Nazi Germany. As Jews, life becomes increasingly difficult for them and their family under the Nazi regime. After witnessing the horrors of Kristallnacht, they realize they must leave their beloved homeland if they hope to survive. They travel to Antwerp, Belgium, and then on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, chasing the diamond trade in hopes of finding work for their father, a diamond merchant. Finally, they find a home in beautiful South Africa and begin to settle down. But just as things begin to feel safe, their new home becomes caught up in it’s own battles of bigotry and hate under the National Party’s demand for an apartheid South Africa. Eva and Inge wonder if they will ever be allowed to live in peace, though they cling to the hope for a better day when there will be “an understanding of the past, compassion for all humanity, and …hope and courage to move forward across great divides.” Worldwide rights are available for this novel. I would like to sell Across Great Divides in Europe, Africa and Asia. The readership for Across Great Divides are history buffs, both female and male, and all ages, from late teens through adult.

    • Biography & True Stories
      March 2011

      Faithful Through Hard Times

      A WW2 True Story

      by Jean Gill

      WW2 military history, with extracts from a soldier's diary The true story of four years, 3 million bombs, one small island out-facing the might of the German and Italian airforces - and one young Scotsman who didn't want to be there. This is not a WW2 memoir. It is a riveting reconstruction from an eye-witness account written at the time in a secret diary, a diary too dangerous to show anyone and too precious to destroy.Young men died in wars and old men lied about what they'd done in them; George had no intention of doing either.Private George Taylor arrived on Malta in 1940 thinking that shiny buttons would earn him fast promotion; he left four years later, a cynical sergeant and a Master Mason who never said, 'I was there' without a bitter smile.Despite the times he said, 'It's me for the next boat', despite his fears that Nettie had forgotten him, George kept the motto of the Royal Army Medical Corps 'In arduis fidelis', 'faithful through hard times' - in public - and only told his diary the inside story of four long years.Sixty years later, the truth has to be told. Book trailer youtube.com/watch?v=WrOShZg44Ec

    • European history
      July 2013

      The forgotten French

      by Nicholas Atkin

      It is widely assumed that the French in the British Isles during World War II were fully-fledged supporters of General De Gaulle, and that across the channel at least, the French were a "nation of resisters". This provocative study reveals that most exiles were on British soil by chance rather than by design, and many were not sure whether to stay. Overlooked by historians, who have concentrated on the "Free French" of De Gaulle, these were the "Forgotten French" - refugees swept off the beaches of Dunkirk; servicemen held in camps after the Franco-German armistice; Vichy consular officials left to cater for their compatriots; and a sizeable colonist community based mainly in London. Drawing on little-known archival sources, this study examines the hopes and fears of these communities who were bitterly divided among themselves, some being attracted to Petain as much as to De Gaulle. It also looks at how they fitted into British life and how the British in turn responded. The author finds that while the public was often charitable, the Government was suspicious of their loyalties and even considered general internment. Illustrated throughout, this should be essential reading for anyone interested in the British and French experiences of World War II.

    • European history
      July 2013

      The forgotten French

      by Nicholas Atkin

      It is widely assumed that the French in the British Isles during World War II were fully-fledged supporters of General De Gaulle, and that across the channel at least, the French were a "nation of resisters". This provocative study reveals that most exiles were on British soil by chance rather than by design, and many were not sure whether to stay. Overlooked by historians, who have concentrated on the "Free French" of De Gaulle, these were the "Forgotten French" - refugees swept off the beaches of Dunkirk; servicemen held in camps after the Franco-German armistice; Vichy consular officials left to cater for their compatriots; and a sizeable colonist community based mainly in London. Drawing on little-known archival sources, this study examines the hopes and fears of these communities who were bitterly divided among themselves, some being attracted to Petain as much as to De Gaulle. It also looks at how they fitted into British life and how the British in turn responded. The author finds that while the public was often charitable, the Government was suspicious of their loyalties and even considered general internment. Illustrated throughout, this should be essential reading for anyone interested in the British and French experiences of World War II.

    • European history
      July 2012

      The forgotten French

      by Nicholas Atkin

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2016

      French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45

      An oral history

      by Bertrand Taithe, Penny Summerfield, Peter Gatrell, Max Jones, Ana Carden-Coyne, Lindsey Dodd

      Children under the Allied bombs in France provides a unique perspective on the Allied bombing of France during the Second World War which killed around 57,000 French civilians. Using oral history as well as archival research, it provides an insight into children's wartime lives in which bombing often featured prominently, even though it has slipped out of French collective memory. How prepared were the French for this aerial onslaught? What was it like to be bombed? And how did people understand why their 'friends' across the Channel were attacking them? Divided into three parts dealing with expectations, experiences and explanations of bombing, this book considers the child's view of wartime violence, analysing resilience, understanding and trauma. It contributes significantly to scholarship on civilian life in Occupied France, and will appeal to students, academics and general readers interested in the history of Vichy France, oral history and the experiences of children in war. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2016

      Mobilizing nature

      The environmental history of war and militarization in modern France

      by Chris Pearson, Bertrand Taithe, Penny Summerfield, Peter Gatrell, Max Jones, Ana Carden-Coyne

      Mobilizing nature traces the environmental history of war and militarization in France, from the creation of Châlons Camp in 1857 to military environmentalist policies in the twentieth century. It offers a fresh perspective on the well-known histories of the Franco-Prussian War, Western Front (1914-18), Second World War, Cold War and the anti-base campaign at Larzac, whilst uncovering the largely 'hidden' history of the numerous military bases and other installations that pepper the French countryside. Mobilizing nature argues that the history of war and militarization can only be fully understood if human and environmental histories are considered in tandem. Preparing for and conducting wars were only made possible through the active manipulation and mobilization of topographies, climatic conditions, vegetation and animals. But the military has not monopolized the mobilization of nature. Protesters against militarization have consistently drawn on images of peaceful and productive civilian environments as the preferable alternative to destructive tanks and bombs. Written in an accessible style, Mobilizing nature will appeal to readers interested in modern France, environmental history, military geographies and histories, anti-military protests, and environmentalism. ;

    • Biography: historical, political & military
      December 1995

      Our Tomorrows Never Came

      Proceedings of an International Conference Held at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, March 16-20, 1999

      by Etunia Bauer Katz

    • History of the Americas
      December 2001

      "I Must be a Part of this War"

      A German American's Fight against Hitler and Nazism

      by Patricia Kollander, with John O'Sullivan

    • Literary essays
      February 1999

      Fighting Fascism in Europe

      The World War II Letters of an American Veteran of the Spanish Civil War

      by Lawrence Cane

      On his first day in basic training in 1942, Lawrence Cane wrote to his wife Grace from Fort Dix, New Jersey. "I'm in the army now - really!", he wrote, complaining, "I don't have enough time to write a decent letter".;Three years later, Captain Lawrence Cane went home from World War II. He'd landed at Utah Beach on D-Day, helped liberate France and Belgium, and survived the Battle of the Bulge. He won a Silver Star for bravery. And he still managed to write 300 letters home to Grace. This book is a different kind of war story - both a powerful chronicle of life in battle and a unique portrait of courage fuelled by a life-long passion for political justice.;Cane's fight for freedom began well before D-Day. In 1937, he joined the Abraham Lincoln Battalion and got wounded fighting for democracy in Spain. In 1942, at age 30, he enlisted in the new war against fascism, and as an officer with the 238th Combat Engineer Battalion, went ashore in Normandy to clear mines, destroy fortifications and open roads from Normandy to the Siegfried Line. Of the 400 Spanish Civil War veterans in World War II, Cane was the only one to go ashore on D-Day.;After the war, Lawrence Cane fought for civil rights and peace until his death in 1976. Discovered in 1995 by Cane's son David, his letters are not only classic accounts of war and unforgettable expressions of love for family, they are the fiercely patriotic words of a left-wing, working class, New York Jew (and one-time Communist Party member) who knew exactly why we fought - to create a better world by destroying all forms of fascism, one battle at a time.;With an introduction by David Cane, detailed notes, and much additional material, these letters add a new dimension to the meaning of American patriotism and a valuable chapter to the history of "the greatest generation".

    • Biography: general
      March 2001

      Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free

      Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW

      by Alexander Jefferson, with Lewis H. Carlson

      This book is a rare and important gift. One of the few memoirs of combat in World War II by a distinguished African-American flier, it is also perhaps the only account of the African-American experience in a German prison camp. Alexander Jefferson was one of 32 Tuskegee Airmen from the 332nd Fighter Group to be shot down defending a country that considered them to be second-class citizens. A Detroit native, Jefferson enlisted in 1942, trained at Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, became a second lieutenant in 1943, and joined one of the most decorated fighting units in the War, flying P51s with their legendary - and feared - "red tails." Based in Italy, Jefferson flew bomber escort missions over southern Europe before being shot down in France in 1944. Captured, he spent the balance of the war in Luftwaffe prison camps in Sagan and Moosberg, Germany. In this vividly detailed, deeply personal book, Jefferson writes as a genuine American hero and patriot. It's an unvarnished look at life behind barbed wire - and what it meant to be an African-American pilot in enemy hands.;It's also a look at race and democracy in America through the eyes of a patriot who fought to protect the promise of freedom. The book features the sketches, drawings, and other illustrations Jefferson created during his nine months as a "kriegie" (POW) and Lewis Carlson's authoritative background to the man, his unit, and the fight Alexander Jefferson fought so well.

    • General & world history
      May 2002

      France during World War II

      From Defeat to Liberation

      by Thomas R. Christofferson, and Michael S. Christofferson

    • Diaries, letters & journals
      October 2004

      Jack Toffey's War

      A Son's Memoir

      by John J. Toffey, IV

    • General & world history
      March 2007

      Hungary in World War II

      Caught in the Cauldron

      by Deborah S. Cornelius

    • Biography: general
      April 2001

      Army GI, Pacifist CO

      The World War II Letters of Frank Dietrich and Albert Dietrich

      by Frank Dietrich, and Albert Dietrich, Edited by Scott H. Bennett

      Frank and Albert Dietrich were identical twins whose lives took very different directions during World War II. Drafted into the Army Air Corps and trained as a radio operator, Frank was shipped to the Philippines in 1945, where as a sergeant in the Fifth Air Force he prepared for the invasion of Japan. Albert, a pacifist, struggled mightily to become a conscientious objector and spent two years building dams, saving farmland, and helping the poor at Civilian Service Camps in South Dakota, Iowa, and Florida. Raised in a close, religious, Pittsburgh family, Frank and Albert were inseparable as boys, sharing a strong social conscience. Divided by war, they kept in touch by writing hundreds of letters to each other. The correspondence concerns everything from the daily drudgery of service - loneliness, lousy food - to heartfelt debates about war, peace, and patriotism. This absorbing selection of letters offers fresh perspectives on the American experience during World War II. The first published correspondence between GI and CO brothers, the letters are an uncommonly articulate chronicle of military service and life on the home front, including GI marriage and parenthood.;Back and forth, Frank and Albert also argued about the uses of armed force and pacifist nonviolence in the face of fascism and Nazism. Frank Dietrich's letters from Manila are vivid descriptions of a liberated city under an uneasy occupation. Albert provides an insider's view of the pacifist experience, especially the protracted efforts pacifists often had to wage to obtain CO status. Together, the letters bring to life different ways Americans chose to serve their country during one of its most dangerous and demanding times.

    • Second World War

      OSS Aaginst the Reich

      The World War II Diaries of Colonel David K. E. Bruce

      by Nelson D. Lankford

      OSS Against the Reich presents the previously unpublished World War II diaries of Colonel David K.E. Bruce, London branch chief of America’s first secret intelligence agency, as he observed the war against Hitler. The entries include eyewitness accounts of D-Day, the rocket attacks on England, and the liberation of Paris. As a top deputy of William J. “Wild Bill” Donovan, founder of the Office of Strategic Services, Bruce kept his diary sporadically in 1942 and made daily entries from the invasion of Normandy until the Battle of the Bulge. Bruce had served in World War I and, as Andrew Mellon’s son-in-law, moved easily in the world of corporate and museum boardrooms and New York society. However, World War II gave him a more serious and satisfying purpose in life; the experience of running the OSS’s most important overseas branch confirmed his lifelong interest in foreign service. After the war, in partnership with his second wife, Evangeline, Bruce headed the Marshall Plan in France and was ambassador to Paris, Bonn, and London. He further served as head of negotiations at the Paris peace talks on Vietnam, first American emissary to China and ambassador to NATO.

    • Second World War

      200,000 Miles Aboard the Destroyer Cotten

      by C. Snelling Robinson (author)

      In mid-June 1943, Snelling Robinson, a 20-year-old Harvard graduate and newly commissioned ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve, joined the pre-commissioning crew of the Fletcher class destroyer USS Cotten. The new crew trained for the remainder of the summer and t hen sailed to Pearl Harbor in time to join the newly established Fifth Fleet. Under t he command of Admiral Raymond Spruance, the Fifth Fleet was given orders to invade Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands in November 1943. This offensive, along with naval battles in the Philippine Sea, the Leyte Gulf, and the invasion of Iwo Jima in February 1945, is chronicled from the perspective of a young deck officer and is integrated with the background of the larger conflict, including the politics of command. After Japan’s surrender, the Cotten became a part of the Occupation Force anchored in Tokyo Bay. Robinson deftly narrates how he and his friends took advantage of their good luck and brought their roles in the war to a fitting conclusion.

    • Second World War

      Above the Thunder

      Reminiscences of a Field Artillery Pilot in World War II

      by Raymond Kerns (author)

      An extraordinary memoir of an aviator’s service in the Pacific Theater“If you’re looking for macho, fighting-man talk, you’ve picked up the wrong book. . . . This is just an honest narration of some of my experiences . . . during my service in the U.S. Army between 1940 and 1945.” —Raymond C. KernsThe son of a Kentucky tobacco farmer, Raymond Kerns dropped out of high school after the eighth grade to help on the farm. He enlisted in the Army in 1940 and, after training as a radio operator in the artillery, was assigned to Schofield Barracks (Oahu) where he witnessed the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and participated in the ensuing battle.In the months before Pearl Harbor, Kerns had passed the Army’s flight training admission exam with flying colors. But because he lacked a high school diploma, the Army refused to give him flying lessons. Undaunted, Private Kerns took lessons with a civilian flying school and was actually scheduled for his first solo flight on the afternoon of December 7, 1941.Notwithstanding his lack of diploma, Kerns graduated from Officer Candidate School and then completed flight training in the L-4 Piper Cub in late 1942. He was assigned to the 33rd Infantry Division in New Guinea and saw extensive combat service there and in the Philippines. In a simple but riveting style, Kerns recalls flying multiple patrols over enemy-held territory in his light unarmored plane, calling and coordinating artillery strikes. While his most effective defense was the remarkable maneuverability and nimbleness of the L-4, he was often required to defend himself with pistols and rifles, hand grenades, and even a machine gun that he welded to his landing gear and once used to blow up an ammunition dump.Proud of his service and convinced of the effectiveness and cost efficiency of the L-4 pilots in the Pacific and Europe, Kerns earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Silver Star.Above the Thunder, arguably one of the best memoirs of combat action during World War II, will appeal to military historians as well as general readers.

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