• African history
      September 2018

      Protection, Patronage, or Plunder? British Machinations and (B)uganda’s Struggle for Independence

      by Author(s): Apollo N. Makubuya

      In the scramble for Africa, Britain took a lion’s share of the continent. It occupied and controlled vast territories, including the Uganda Protectorate – which it ruled for 68 years. Early administrators in the region encountered the progressive kingdom of Buganda, which they incorporated into the British Empire. Under the guise of protection, indirect rule and patronage, Britain overran, plundered and disempowered the kingdom’s traditional institutions. On liquidation of the Empire, Buganda was coaxed into a problematic political order largely dictated from London. Today, 56 years after independence, the kingdom struggles to rediscover itself within Uganda’s fragile politics. Based on newly de-classified records, this book reconstructs a history of the machinations underpinning British imperial interests in (B)Uganda and the personalities who embodied colonial rule. It addresses Anglo-Uganda relations, demonstrating how Uganda’s politics reflects its colonial past, and the forces shaping its future. It is a far-reaching examination of British rule in (B)uganda, questioning whether it was designed for protection, for patronage or for plunder.

    • Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      November 2015

      Empire, migration and identity in the British World

      by Keith Povey

      The essays in this volume have been written by leading experts in their respective fields and bring together established scholars with a new generation of migration and transnational historians. Their work weaves together the 'new' imperial and the 'new' migration histories, and is essential reading for scholars and students interested in the interplay of migration within and between the local, regional, imperial, and transnational arenas. Furthermore, these essays set an important analytical benchmark for more integrated and comparative analyses of the range of migratory processes - free and coerced - which together impacted on the dynamics of power, forms of cultural circulation and making of ethnicities across a British imperial world.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      November 2015

      Empire, migration and identity in the British World

      by Keith Povey

      The essays in this volume have been written by leading experts in their respective fields and bring together established scholars with a new generation of migration and transnational historians. Their work weaves together the 'new' imperial and the 'new' migration histories, and is essential reading for scholars and students interested in the interplay of migration within and between the local, regional, imperial, and transnational arenas. Furthermore, these essays set an important analytical benchmark for more integrated and comparative analyses of the range of migratory processes - free and coerced - which together impacted on the dynamics of power, forms of cultural circulation and making of ethnicities across a British imperial world.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      November 2015

      Heroic imperialists in Africa

      The promotion of British and French colonial heroes, 1870–1939

      by Berny Sèbe

      From the height of 'New Imperialism' until the Second World War, three generations of heroes of the British and French empires in Africa were selected, manufactured and packaged for consumption by a metropolitan public eager to discover new horizons and to find comfort in the concept of a 'civilising mission'. This book looks at imperial heroism by examining the legends of a dozen major colonial figures on both sides of the Channel, revisiting the familiar stories of Livingstone, Gordon and Kitchener from a radically new angle, and throwing light on their French counterparts, often less famous in the Anglophone world but certainly equally fascinating.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      November 2015

      Heroic imperialists in Africa

      The promotion of British and French colonial heroes, 1870–1939

      by Berny Sèbe

      From the height of 'New Imperialism' until the Second World War, three generations of heroes of the British and French empires in Africa were selected, manufactured and packaged for consumption by a metropolitan public eager to discover new horizons and to find comfort in the concept of a 'civilising mission'. This book looks at imperial heroism by examining the legends of a dozen major colonial figures on both sides of the Channel, revisiting the familiar stories of Livingstone, Gordon and Kitchener from a radically new angle, and throwing light on their French counterparts, often less famous in the Anglophone world but certainly equally fascinating.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      July 2015

      Engines for empire

      The Victorian army and its use of railways

      by Edward M. Spiers

      Engines for Empire examines the use of the railway by the British army from the 1830s to 1914, a period of domestic political strife and unprecedented imperial expansion. The book uses a wide array of sources and images to demonstrate how the Victorian army embraced this new technology, how it monitored foreign wars, and how it came to use the railway in both support and operational roles. The British army's innovation is also revealed, through its design and use of armoured trains, the restructuring of hospital trains, and in its capacity to build and repair railway track, bridges, and signals under field conditions. This volume provides insights on the role of railways in imperial development, as a focus of social interaction between adversaries, and as a means of projecting imperial power. It will make fascinating reading for students, academics and enthusiasts in military and imperial history, Victorian studies, railway history and colonial warfare.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      July 2015

      Knowledge, mediation and empire

      James Tod's journeys among the Rajputs

      by Florence D'Souza

      This study of the British colonial administrator James Tod (1782-1835), who spent five years in north-western India (1818-22) collecting every conceivable type of material of historical or cultural interest on the Rajputs and the Gujaratis, gives special attention to his role as a mediator of knowledge about this little-known region of the British Empire in the early nineteenth century to British and European audiences. The book aims to illustrate that British officers did not spend all their time oppressing and inferiorising the indigenous peoples under their colonial authority, but also contributed to propagating cultural and scientific information about them, and that they did not react only negatively to the various types of human difference they encountered in the field.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      January 2015

      An Anglican British world

      The Church of England and the expansion of the settler empire, c. 1790–1860

      by Joseph Hardwick. Series edited by Andrew S. Thompson, John Mackenzie

      This book looks at how that oft-maligned institution, the Anglican Church, coped with mass migration from Britain in the first half of the nineteenth century. The book details the great array of institutions, voluntary societies and inter-colonial networks that furnished the Church with the men and money that enabled it to sustain a common institutional structure and a common set of beliefs across a rapidly-expanding 'British world'. It also sheds light on how this institutional context contributed to the formation of colonial Churches with distinctive features and identities. One of the book's key aims is to show how the colonial Church should be of interest to more than just scholars and students of religious and Church history. The colonial Church was an institution that played a vital role in the formation of political publics and ethnic communities in a settler empire that was being remoulded by the advent of mass migration, democracy and the separation of Church and State.

    • Colonialism & imperialism
      March 2015

      Britain's lost revolution?

      Jacobite Scotland and French grand strategy, 1701–8

      by Daniel Szechi

    • European history
      July 2012

      British imperialism in Cyprus, 1878–1915

      The inconsequential possession

      by Andrekos Varnava

      This book explores the tensions underlying British imperialism in Cyprus. Much has been written about the British empire's construction outside Europe, yet there is little on the same themes in Britain's tiny empire in 'Europe'. This study follows Cyprus' progress from a perceived imperial asset to an expendable backwater by explaining how the Union Jack came to fly over the island and why after thirty-five years the British wanted it lowered. Cyprus' importance was always more imagined than real and was enmeshed within widely held cultural signifiers and myths. This book fills a gap in the existing literature on the early British period in Cyprus and challenges the received and monolithic view that British imperial policy was based primarily or exclusively on strategic-military considerations. The combination of archival research, cultural analysis and visual narrative that makes for an enjoyable read for academics and students of imperial, British and European history.

    • Regional studies

      Negotiation Within Domination

      New Spain's Indian Pueblos Confront the Spanish State

      by Ethelia Ruiz Medrano (Editor) , Susan Kellogg (Editor)

      This book examines the formation of colonial governance in New Spain through interactions between indigenous peoples and representatives of the Spanish Crown. The book highlights the complexity of native negotiation and mediation with colonial rule across time, culture, and place and how it shaped colonial political and legal structures from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Although indigenous communities reacted to Spanish presence with significant acts of resistance and rebellion, they also turned to negotiation to deal with conflicts and ameliorate the consequences of colonial rule. This affected not only the development of legal systems in New Spain and Mexico but also the survival and continuation of traditional cultures. Bringing together work by Mexican and North American historians, this collection is a crucially important and rare contribution to the field. This is a valuable resource for native peoples as they seek to redefine and revitalise their identities and assert their rights relating to language and religion, ownership of lands and natural resources, rights of self-determination and self-government, and protection of cultural and intellectual property. It will be of interest primarily to specialists in the field of colonial studies and historians and ethno-historians of New Spain.

    • Biography: historical, political & military
      May 2010

      I Remember It Well

      Fifty Years of Colonial Service Personal Reminiscences

      by David Le Breton

      Life in the Colonial Service was varied, sometimes dangerous, often hilarious but never dull. Members of the Overseas Service Pensioners’ Association served the Crown in far-flung territories both before and after World War II. Their reminiscences were published in whole or in part from time to time in the Association’s biannual Journal, the Overseas Pensioner. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Overseas Service Pensioners’ Association, David Le Breton has selected over seventy contributions spanning the life of the Association, and earlier. They write about their personal lives; from their first tour, travel, work and leisure activities. Anthony Kirk Greene writes in his foreword ‘Without doubt such pen-portraits of events and personalities, some of them rendered all the more historically valuable when they focussed on the experiences of pre-war Colonial Service life, provide a positive contribution to a fuller understanding of what we did and how we lived and worked.’ It is a book which will appeal to students of general history as well as those who spent time in the colonies or who now visit the modern countries they have since become.

    • Fiction
      2001

      Ama

      A Story Of The Atlantic Slave Trade

      by Manu Herbstein

      Ama: A Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade by Manu Herbstein Winner of the 2002 Commonwealth Writers Prize for the Best First Book "I am a human being; I am a woman; I am a black woman; I am an African. Once I was free; then I was captured and became a slave; but inside me, I have never been a slave, inside me here and here, I am still a free woman." In the course of four hundred years some twelve million Africans were forcibly transported across the Atlantic to serve European settlers and their descendants. Only the barest fragments of their stories have survived. Manu Herbstein's ambitious, meticulously researched and moving novel sets out to recreate one of these lives, following Ama, its eponymous heroine, from her home in the Sahel, through Kumase at the height of Asante power, and Elmina, centre of the Dutch slave trade, to a sugar plantation in Brazil. "This is story telling on a grand scale," writes Tony Simões da Silva. "In Ama, Herbstein creates a work of literature that celebrates the resilience of human beings while denouncing the inscrutable nature of their cruelty. By focusing on the brutalisation of Ama's body, and on the psychological scars of her experiences, Herbstein dramatises the collective trauma of slavery through the story of a single African woman. Ama echoes the views of writers, historians and philosophers of the African diaspora who have argued that the phenomenon of slavery is inextricable from the deepest foundations of contemporary western civilisation."

    • Fiction
      August 2014

      Ramseyer's Ghost

      by Manu Herbstein

      Ramseyer’s Ghost is a stand-alone dystopian/utopian political novel set in West Africa in 2050. The global village has disintegrated. The Atlantic Ocean has become an American sea. West Africa has become a desert of failed states and anarchy, dotted with mines and oil rigs, stockaded and armed by U. S. corporations. The Americans dispatch expeditions of geologists and mining engineers into the dangerous interior of the Dark Continent to search for untapped resources. One such expedition has gone missing. Ekem “Crash” Ferguson, born in the U.S. in 2008 of African parents and abandoned to the care of foster parents, is a Captain in the Marine Corps. His career blocked and his marriage failing, he accepts an offer to proceed to Ghana on a one-man mission to find the missing experts. He suspects that his supervising officer, Bud Power, is having an affair with this wife. His arrival in Africa is inauspicious: in a shack amongst the coconut palms he comes across two human skeletons. A boy guides him to a coastal village. He tells the chief that he has come to Ghana to search for his natural parents. The chief welcomes him and delegates fisherman Kofi Kom to accompany him to Kumase, the Asante capital, 120 miles up-country. In Kumase, Crash goes to the stadium at dead of night to await the arrival of the three Thunderbirds, each carrying an armoured vehicle that will take the rescue party to the Fort. As the Thunderbirds touch down, they are blown up. Crash survives and is arrested. Anokye, the Asante king’s first minister, interrogates Crash. He is put on trial and convicted but Anokye intervenes to save him from execution. As part of his sentence, Crash travels the country as a movie about the abortive invasion is screened in one village after another. He is impressed by what he perceives as a unique social experiment, led by Anokye, an attempt to build a decent, viable society in an economy barely above subsistence level. After a year, Crash has completed his sentence and is permitted to return to the U.S. Anokye, now retired, accompanies him to the coastal village at which Crash arrived. There Anokye reveals to him that they are brothers and that the skeletons Crash found on his arrival are those of their parents. After burying his parents’ remains, Crash arranges a passage to New York in a passing oil tanker. As soon as he rings his doorbell, Millicent phones the Marines and Crash is arrested. He is charged with treason, tried and subsequently executed. Bud abandons Millicent. Years later, after he has graduated from college, Crash’s son Fergus questions his mother about his late father. She refuses to talk. He gets a job as a cleaner in the Marine archives, “borrows” his father’s file and publishes the contents in the public domain. When the authorities start looking for him, he is already on his way to Africa, where he hopes to find his Uncle Anokye.

    • Children's & YA
      September 2014

      The Boy who Spat in Sargrenti's Eye

      by Manu Herbstein

      On 13 June 1873 British forces bombarded Elmina town in the Gold Coast (now Ghana) and destroyed it. To this day it has not been rebuilt. Later that same year, using seaborne artillery, the British flattened ten coastal towns and villages – including Axim, Takoradi and Sekondi. On 6th February, 1874, after looting the Asantehene’s palace in Kumase, British troops blew up the stone building and set the city on fire, razing it to the ground. 15-year old Kofi Gyan witnesses these events and records them in his diary. This novel, first published soon after the 140th anniversary of the sack of Kumase, tells his story. Several historical characters feature in the novel: the Asantehene Kofi Karikari, the war correspondents Henry Morton Stanley and G. A. Henty and the war artist of the Illustrated London News, Melton Prior, who employs Kofi as his assistant. The novel is illustrated with 70 black and white images, mainly from the Illustrated London News of 1873 and 1874 The image on the front cover is of a solid gold mask looted from the Asantehene’s palace. It now resides in the vaults of the Wallace Collection in London. The Boy who Spat in Sargrenti’s Eye is one of three winners of the 2013 Burt Award for African Literature in Ghana. The Burt Award for African Literature recognises excellence in young adult fiction from African countries. It supports the writing and publication of high quality, culturally relevant books and ensures their distribution to schools and libraries to help develop young people’s literacy skills and foster their love of reading. The Burt Award is generously sponsored by the Canadian philanthropist, Bill Burt, and is part of the ongoing literacy programmes of the Ghana Book Trust and of CODE, a Canadian NGO which has been supporting development through education for over 50 years. The Burt Award includes the guaranteed purchase of 3000 copies of the winning books for free distribution to secondary school libraries.

    • Adventure
      February 2014

      The Empress Emerald

      by J.G. Harlond

      Leo Kazan is an orphan (or so he believes) and a talented linguist. He is also a thief, attracted like a magpie to anything that glitters. Leo becomes the protege of a high-ranking member of the British Raj who turns him into a spy. From an early age. Leo is involved in international espionage and diamond smuggling which takes him from India to Britain and Russia. But the most meaningful time in his life is when he meets an innocent English girl, Davina Dymond, in London. As the drums of war reverberate around the world for a second time, Leo begins to understand his personal history and realises the importance of his Indian background, and the true meaning of Home Rule. Davina, trapped in war-torn Spain, turns to crime to survive. Both must unshackle themselves from those who seek to manipulate them before they can find true happiness - and each other.

    • Colonialism & imperialism

      The People's Right to the Novel

      War Fiction in the Postcolony

      by Eleni Coundouriotis

      This study offers a literary history of the war novel in Africa. Coundouriotis argues that this genre, aimed more specifically at African readers than the continent’s better-known bildungsroman tradition, nevertheless makes an important intervention in global understandings of human rights. The African war novel lies at the convergence of two sensibilities it encounters in European traditions: the naturalist aesthetic and the discourse of humanitarianism, whether in the form of sentimentalism or of human rights law. Both these sensibilities are present in culturally hybrid forms in the African war novel, reflecting its syncretism as a narrative practice engaged with the colonial and postcolonial history of the continent. The war novel, Coundouriotis argues, stakes claims to collective rights that contrast with the individualism of the bildungsroman tradition. The genre is a form of people’s history that participates in a political struggle for the rights of the dispossessed.

    • Colonialism & imperialism

      The People's Right to the Novel

      War Fiction in the Postcolony

      by Eleni Coundouriotis

      This study offers a literary history of the war novel in Africa. Coundouriotis argues that this genre, aimed more specifically at African readers than the continent’s better-known bildungsroman tradition, nevertheless makes an important intervention in global understandings of human rights. The African war novel lies at the convergence of two sensibilities it encounters in European traditions: the naturalist aesthetic and the discourse of humanitarianism, whether in the form of sentimentalism or of human rights law. Both these sensibilities are present in culturally hybrid forms in the African war novel, reflecting its syncretism as a narrative practice engaged with the colonial and postcolonial history of the continent. The war novel, Coundouriotis argues, stakes claims to collective rights that contrast with the individualism of the bildungsroman tradition. The genre is a form of people’s history that participates in a political struggle for the rights of the dispossessed.

    • Colonialism & imperialism

      The People's Right to the Novel

      War Fiction in the Postcolony

      by Eleni Coundouriotis

      This study offers a literary history of the war novel in Africa. Coundouriotis argues that this genre, aimed more specifically at African readers than the continent’s better-known bildungsroman tradition, nevertheless makes an important intervention in global understandings of human rights. The African war novel lies at the convergence of two sensibilities it encounters in European traditions: the naturalist aesthetic and the discourse of humanitarianism, whether in the form of sentimentalism or of human rights law. Both these sensibilities are present in culturally hybrid forms in the African war novel, reflecting its syncretism as a narrative practice engaged with the colonial and postcolonial history of the continent. The war novel, Coundouriotis argues, stakes claims to collective rights that contrast with the individualism of the bildungsroman tradition. The genre is a form of people’s history that participates in a political struggle for the rights of the dispossessed.

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