• Teaching, Language & Reference
      January 2009

      Sorbonne Confidential

      by Laurel Zuckerman

      After losing her high tech job in Paris, Alice Wunderland dreams of a new, unemployment-proof career as English teacher and decides to dedicate a year to training for France's prestigious competitive exam; After all, she reasons, how hard can it be for an educated American to pass a test in English? She enrolls at the Sorbonne, but her Arizona English fails to impress. Even Shakespeare's English falls short. Only one English will do: Sorbonne English! Even while learning this new language, Alice vows to investigate: Why devise an English exam that few native speakers can pass ? Could this explain why French schoolchildren rank last for English skills in Europe? Is it true that Frenchness is a question of formatting? If so, can a foreigner even one with French nationality ever become truly French? As riots break out in France among the children of immigrants, Alice cannot help but wonder: could there be any connection between her bewildering experience and theirs? A hilarious, hair-raising insider's look at the esoteric world of French Education. (Harriet Welty Rochefort --author of French Toast).

    • History
      January 2007

      L’embryon et son âme dans les sources grecques (VIe s. av. J.-C.-Ve s. apr. J.-C.)

      by Marie-Hélène CONGOURDEAU 

      Comment l’âme vient-elle à l’embryon? Quel rapport le corps entretient-il avec son âme? Cet ouvrage explore les théories des tenants d’une épopée de l’âme tombée du ciel, attelée à un corps et cherchant à regagner le monde des esprits purs, et celles des irréductibles de l’âme non séparable pour qui l’âme ne peut se concevoir indépendamment du corps qu’elle anime. D’où vient l’âme? Quand s’unit-elle au corps en gestation? L’enquête montre que c’est sur ces fondations que se bâtira la réflexion médiévale, avec ses retombées juridiques et éthiques.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2011

      Environmental and Social Justice in the City

      Historical Perspectives

      by Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud and Richard Rodger (eds)

      The world is full of environmental injustices and inequalities, yet few European historians have tackled these subjects head on; nor have they explored their relationships with social inequalities. In this innovative collection of historical essays the contributors consider a range of past environmental injustices, spanning seven northern and western European countries and with several chapters adding a North American perspective. In addition to an introductory chapter that surveys approaches to this area of environmental history, individual chapters address inequalities in the city as regards water supply, air pollution, waste disposal, factory conditions, industrial effluents, fuel poverty and the administrative and legal arrangements that discriminated against segments of society.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Why China did not have a Renaissance – and why that matters

      An interdisciplinary Dialogue

      by Thomas Maissen, Barbara Mittler

      Concepts of historical progress or decline and the idea of a cycle of historical movement have existed in many civilizations. In spite of claims that they be transnational or even universal, periodization schemes invariably reveal specific social and cultural predispositions.Our dialogue, which brings together a Sinologist and a scholar of early modern History in Europe, considers periodization as a historical phenomenon, studying the case of the “Renaissance.” Understood in the tradition of J. Burckhardt, who referred back to ideas voiced by the humanists of the 14th and 15th centuries, and focusing on the particularities of humanist dialogue which informed the making of the “Renaissance” in Italy, our discussion highlights elements that distinguish it from other movements that have proclaimed themselves as “r/Renaissances,” studying, in particular, the Chinese Renaissance in the early 20th century.While disagreeing on several fundamental issues, we suggest that interdisciplinary and interregional dialogue is a format useful to addressing some of the more far-reaching questions in global history, e.g. whether and when a periodization scheme such as “Renaissance” can fruitfully be applied to describe non-European experiences.

    • The Arts
      October 2018

      Reading Room

      Re-Lektüren des Innenraums

      by Christine Göttler, Peter J. Schneemann, Birgitt Borkopp-Restle, Norberto Gramaccini, Peter W. Marx, Bernd Nicolai

      Reading Room erprobt Entwürfe, Theorien und Lektüren des Innenraums von der Frühen Neuzeit bis in die Gegenwart. Ausgangspunkt ist ein dynamisches und relationales Raumkonzept, das die Vielfalt historischer Medien, Kontexte und Diskurse berücksichtigt. Die Beiträge untersuchen die Erzeugung und Umformung von Innenräumen durch soziale Praktiken und visuelle und materielle Strategien. Sie bieten exemplarische Lektüren heterotopischer, dystopischer und utopischer Raumsituationen in Kunst, Architektur und Theater im Spannungsfeld von Innen und Außen, Realität und Repräsentation. Das Buch entwickelt Fragestellungen weiter, die gegenwärtig in der Kunst- und Architekturgeschichte und der Theaterwissenschaft verhandelt werden.

    • Society & culture: general
      June 2018

      Feng·Ya·Song

      by Wu Gou

      This is an interesting book dealing with the elegant demeanor and graceful bearing in Song Dynasty. Having the aid of the combination of Song pictures, historical documents and the positive result of the post-research, the author reveals all the aspects of people's daily life in Song Dynasty, full of vim and vigor, showing the social ethos and the spirit of time. The book is divided into six parts in its edition, the first part tells about Song people's daily life; the second, Song people's fined playing and cultivated taste; the third, the social condition; the fourth, the public facilities; the fifth, the commercial prosperity; the last, the communicative protocol. The successive achievements in the book depend on the good treatment of hundreds of Song Pictures and paintings, and at the same time from a few pictures and paintings of the dynasties of Tang, Ming and Qing. Between each other of them, they were made fair comparisons.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      2015

      The Character of China

      by Lou Yulie

      The book is a master work of 50 years’ academic exploration. It is a popularization work which introduces the connotation and humanism of Chinese traditional culture. The professor from PekingU spent 50 years in philosophy studies exploring Chinese culture root from the ups and downs of centuries which made this book into 8 parts: including interpreting the relations of traditional cultural conceptions with the three major ideas’ (Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism) , with the artistic spirit, and with the Chinese medicine.

    • Feminism & feminist theory
      June 2014

      Girl Trouble

      Panic and Progress in the History of Young Women

      by Carol Dyhouse

      Girls behave badly. If they're not obscenity-shouting, pint-swigging ladettes, they're narcissistic, living dolls floating around in a cloud of self-obsession, far too busy twerking to care. And this is news. In this witty and wonderful book, Carol Dyhouse shows that where there's a social scandal or a wave of moral outrage, you can bet a girl is to blame. Whether it be stories of 'brazen flappers' staying out and up all night in the 1920s, inappropriate places for Mars bars in the 1960s or Courtney Love's mere existence in the 1990s, bad girls have been a mass-media staple for more than a century. And yet, despite the continued obsession with their perceived faults and blatant disobedience, girls are infinitely better off today than they were a century ago. This is the story of the challenges and opportunities faced by young women growing up in the swirl of the twentieth century, and the pop-hysteria that continues to accompany their progress.

    • True stories
      April 2013

      Once Upon a Time in the Sixties

      by Maddick, Peter

      If you remember the Sixties, then you weren't there'. Well Peter Maddick was there and he remembers most of it - the King's Road, Chelsea; the trendy models and hip photographers; the ad men; the road to St. Tropez; the hippy trail from Kathmandu. And let's not forget what the sixties is really famous for - free love!

    • Social & cultural history
      May 2012

      Urban Culture in Medieval Wales

      by Helen Fulton (Editor)

      This collection of twelve essays describes aspects of town life in medieval Wales, from the way people lived and worked to how they spent their leisure time. Drawing on evidence from historical records, archaeology and literature, twelve leading scholars outline the diversity of town life and urban identity in medieval Wales. While urban histories of Wales have charted the economic growth of towns in post-Norman Wales, much less has been written about the nature of urban culture in Wales. This book fills in some of the gaps about how people lived in towns and the kinds of cultural experience which helped to construct a Welsh urban identity.

    • Social & cultural history
      June 2011

      Exodus from Cardiganshire

      Rural-Urban Migration in Victorian Britain

      by Kathryn J. Cooper (Author)

      Cardiganshire was one of the few counties of England and Wales whose populations in 1911 were less than in 1851. This was despite natural increase, indicating that considerable out-migration was taking place. Indeed, the movement out of central and west Wales has formed the most consistent de-population trend in Britain apart from that from the Highlands of Scotland. This book explores the chronology and geography of out-migration from Victorian Cardiganshire, with particular reference to the dramatic decline that gathered pace from the 1870s. Contemporary source material is used to examine socio-economic conditions in nineteenth-century Cardiganshire. Factors that prompted the outward movement are identified, and features of rural life that were crucial to the migration process are revealed. Central to the book is computer-assisted analysis of data from the Victorian census. The trend of rural out-migration in nineteenth-century England and Wales is examined, and the experience of Cardiganshire is set within this context. The major destinations for the county’s migrants were Glamorgan, Carmarthenshire, London, and Merseyside; and analysis of the census data focuses on key aspects of the Cardiganshire migration to these destinations. The book concludes with a brief examination of nineteenth-century emigration from Cardiganshire, drawing on contemporary newspaper reports, harbour records and private letters. Key sending areas and destinations are identified; motivations for emigration are considered; and the role of a common culture and a shared background of geographical and family origins within the migration process is explored. This is the only study of migration in Victorian Britain that deals with both the sending area and the destination communities in any detail.

    • Social & cultural history
      February 2012

      Whose People?

      Wales, Israel, Palestine

      by Jasmine Donahaye (Author)

      Wales has a centuries-long history of interest in Palestine and Israel, and a particularly close interest in Jews and Zionism, which has been expressed widely in the literature. Whose People? Wales, Israel, Palestine is the first monograph to explore this subject. It asks difficult and probing questions about the relationship that Wales has had with Palestine in the past, and now has with the Israel-Palestine situation in the present, and it challenges received wisdom about Welsh tolerance and liberalism. Using publications in Welsh and in English across several centuries, this survey examines Welsh missionary efforts and colonial desires in Palestine; complex and contradictory attitudes to Jews, and the use of Zionism and the Hebrew language revival as a model for Wales. Beginning with an analysis of a so-called tradition of Welsh identification with Jews, the study locates its origins in the early twentieth century, and moves on to uncover provocative material in Welsh conversionist writing on Jews, Muslims and Samaritans in Palestine in the nineteenth century, and imaging of Jews in twentieth-century fiction and the periodical press. It concludes with a survey of Jewish literary responses to Wales that suggests that some Jewish writers have been active agents in reinforcing Welsh support of Zionism in particular. The evidence uncovered here shows a complex picture of a unique cultural and political relationship. Whose People? Wales, Israel, Palestine makes an important contribution to international Jewish studies, to the study of British colonial involvement in Palestine, and to Welsh and Jewish literary and cultural history.

    • Cultural studies
      August 2000

      Small Town

      by Granville Hicks, Introduction by Warren F. Broderick, Foreword by Ron Powers

      Granville Hicks was one of America's most influential literary and social critics. Along with Malcolm Cowley, F. O. Matthiessen, Max Eastman, Alfred Kazin, and others, he shaped the cultural landscape of 20th-century America. In 1947 Hicks published Small Town, a portrait of life in the rural crossroads of Grafton, N.Y., where he had moved after being fired from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for his left-wing political views.;In this book, he combines a kind of hand-crafted ethnographic research with personal reflections on the qualities of small town life that were being threatened by spreading cities and suburbs. He eloquently tried to define the essential qualities of small town community life and to link them to the best features of American culture. The book sparked numerous articles and debates in a baby-boom America nervously on the move. Long out of print, this classic of cultural criticism speaks powerfully to a new generation seeking to reconnect with a sense of place in American life, both rural and urban. An unaffected, deeply felt portrait of one such place by one of the best American critics, it should find a new home as a vivid reminder of what we have lost - and what we might still be able to protect.

    • History of the Americas
      November 1995

      A Short and Remarkable History of New York City

      An Anthology of Best Writing in the Western Mail Through the 20th Century

      by Jane Mushabac, and Angela Wigan

    • Social & cultural history
      October 2000

      Freedom's First Generation

      Black Hampton, Virginia, 1861-1890

      by Robert F. Engs

      In this age of affirmative action and increasing complexity in black-white relations, this pioneering study of Hampton, Virginia, tells the story of what race relations in postbellum America "might have been." Here, if only for a time, the promises of Emancipation and Reconstruction were fulfilled. Why was the American Dream realized by blacks in Hampton and not elsewhere? Engs follows a community of freedmen over a thirty-year period to answer this compelling question.

    • Manufacturing industries
      April 2000

      A Coat of Many Colors

      Immigration, Globalization, and Reform in New York City's Garment Industry

      by Edited by Daniel Soyer, Preface by Ruth Abram

      For more than a century and a half - from the middle of the 19th century to the end of the 20th - the garment industry was the largest manufacturing industry in New York City, and New York made more clothes than anywhere else. For generations, the industry employed more New Yorkers than any other and was central to the city's history, culture, and identity. Today, although no longer the big heart of industrial New York, the needle trades are still an important part of the city's economy - especially for the new waves of immigrants who cut, sew, and assemble clothing in shops around the five boroughs. In this valuable book, historians, sociologists, and economists explore the rise and fall of the garment industry and its impact on New York and its people, as part of a global process of economic change. Essays trace the rise of the industry, from the creation of a Manhattan garment district employing immigrants from nearby tenements to the contemporary spread of Chinese-owned shops in cheaper neighborhoods.;The tumultuous history of workers and their bosses is the focus of chapters on contractors and labor militants and on the experiences of Italian, Chinese, Jewish, Dominican, and other ethnic workers. The final chapter looks at fair labor, social responsibility, and the political economy of the offshore garment industry.

    • Manufacturing industries
      April 2000

      A Coat of Many Colors

      Immigration, Globalization, and Reform in New York City's Garment Industry

      by Edited by Daniel Soyer, Preface by Ruth Abram

      For more than a century and a half - from the middle of the 19th century to the end of the 20th - the garment industry was the largest manufacturing industry in New York City, and New York made more clothes than anywhere else. For generations, the industry employed more New Yorkers than any other and was central to the city's history, culture, and identity. Today, although no longer the big heart of industrial New York, the needle trades are still an important part of the city's economy - especially for the new waves of immigrants who cut, sew, and assemble clothing in shops around the five boroughs. In this valuable book, historians, sociologists, and economists explore the rise and fall of the garment industry and its impact on New York and its people, as part of a global process of economic change. Essays trace the rise of the industry, from the creation of a Manhattan garment district employing immigrants from nearby tenements to the contemporary spread of Chinese-owned shops in cheaper neighborhoods.;The tumultuous history of workers and their bosses is the focus of chapters on contractors and labor militants and on the experiences of Italian, Chinese, Jewish, Dominican, and other ethnic workers. The final chapter looks at fair labor, social responsibility, and the political economy of the offshore garment industry.

    • European history
      April 2002

      Commemorating Trauma

      The Paris Commune and Its Cultural Aftermath

      by Peter Starr

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