• History: specific events & topics
      March 2006

      Another Man's Shoes

      by Sven Somme

      Another Man's Shoes is a gripping first-hand account of a Norwegian scientist's escape from German custody during the Second World War after his arrest for spying. Written just after the war, Sven Somme vividly describes his 200-mile trek across the mountains, pursued by German soldiers, in a bid to reach Sweden and freedom in 1944.

    • Biography & True Stories

      From That Flame

      A Novelized Account of the Life, Death, and Legacy of Ahmed Shah Massoud

      by MaryAnn T. Beverly

      FROM THAT FLAME follows journalist Michelle Garrett as she interviews the legendary Commander Ahmed Shah Massoud – the “Lion of Panjshir” – in Afghanistan’s rugged Hindu Kush Mountains. Without warning, an attack by Taliban and al-Qaeda troops propels Michelle into a wartime adventure with Commander Massoud and his Mujahidin, one in which a friendship between the journalist and Massoud grows, giving her a unique perspective into the man the Wall Street Journal credited as being “the Afghan who ended the Cold War.”

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      January 2009

      Sorbonne Confidential

      by Laurel Zuckerman

      After losing her high tech job in Paris, Alice Wunderland dreams of a new, unemployment-proof career as English teacher and decides to dedicate a year to training for France's prestigious competitive exam; After all, she reasons, how hard can it be for an educated American to pass a test in English? She enrolls at the Sorbonne, but her Arizona English fails to impress. Even Shakespeare's English falls short. Only one English will do: Sorbonne English! Even while learning this new language, Alice vows to investigate: Why devise an English exam that few native speakers can pass ? Could this explain why French schoolchildren rank last for English skills in Europe? Is it true that Frenchness is a question of formatting? If so, can a foreigner even one with French nationality ever become truly French? As riots break out in France among the children of immigrants, Alice cannot help but wonder: could there be any connection between her bewildering experience and theirs? A hilarious, hair-raising insider's look at the esoteric world of French Education. (Harriet Welty Rochefort --author of French Toast).

    • History
      January 2007

      L’embryon et son âme dans les sources grecques (VIe s. av. J.-C.-Ve s. apr. J.-C.)

      by Marie-Hélène CONGOURDEAU 

      Comment l’âme vient-elle à l’embryon? Quel rapport le corps entretient-il avec son âme? Cet ouvrage explore les théories des tenants d’une épopée de l’âme tombée du ciel, attelée à un corps et cherchant à regagner le monde des esprits purs, et celles des irréductibles de l’âme non séparable pour qui l’âme ne peut se concevoir indépendamment du corps qu’elle anime. D’où vient l’âme? Quand s’unit-elle au corps en gestation? L’enquête montre que c’est sur ces fondations que se bâtira la réflexion médiévale, avec ses retombées juridiques et éthiques.

    • History
      November 2015

      Jimmy Hoffa Called My Mom A Bitch: Profiles in Stupidity

      by Jason H. Vines

      The book is broken up into various chapters of stupidity: Stupid Democrats, Stupid Republicans, Stupid Atheists, Stupid Christians, Stupid Criminals, Stupid Policies, Stupid People and so on. The “Stupid Criminals” chapter contains one of my favorite columns that appeared on the Detroit News’ political website. The June 29, 2010 column is titled “Globe Al Warming Gets Rubbed the Wrong Way,” and it takes on allegations that the former VP got inappropriately horny with female masseuse at a Portland, Oregon hotel. That column also continues the sick, yet hilarious saga of Otis “Masturgate” Mathis, the illiterate (no kidding), former head of Detroit Public Schools who was forced out after he admittedly fondled himself in front of numerous female superintendents. No, I am not making this up. I coined the scandal “Masturgate” and it soon became the rage in Detroit media and made my column one of the most popular on the site.

    • History

      AmaZizi: the Dlamini of Southern Africa 2nd Ed

      by Jongisilo Z. Z. Pokwana Ka Menziwa, Ngangomzi Pokwana Ah! Jongumhlaba

      The Dlamini people are a stock race that, during the 19th century, spread throughout the then largely uninhabited Southern Africa. Today they can be found concentrated in Swaziland, in the Eastern Cape, in KwaZulu Natal and in many other parts of the country. The first edition traced a story of these people from before 2000 years ago until today, then focused on a section of the Dlamini known as AmaZizi. The second edition expands this base with new research and information. If you have the surname Dlamini, the history and traditions of your ancestors can be found within these pages.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2011

      Environmental and Social Justice in the City

      Historical Perspectives

      by Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud and Richard Rodger (eds)

      The world is full of environmental injustices and inequalities, yet few European historians have tackled these subjects head on; nor have they explored their relationships with social inequalities. In this innovative collection of historical essays the contributors consider a range of past environmental injustices, spanning seven northern and western European countries and with several chapters adding a North American perspective. In addition to an introductory chapter that surveys approaches to this area of environmental history, individual chapters address inequalities in the city as regards water supply, air pollution, waste disposal, factory conditions, industrial effluents, fuel poverty and the administrative and legal arrangements that discriminated against segments of society.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Tyne after Tyne

      An Environmental History of a River’s Battle for Protection 1529–2015

      by Leona J. Skelton

      Over the last five centuries, North-East England’s River Tyne went largely with the flow as it rode with us on a rollercoaster from technologically limited early modern oligarchy, to large-scale Victorian ‘improvement’, to twentieth-century deoxygenation and twenty-first-century efforts to expand biodiversity. Studying five centuries of Tyne conservatorship reveals that 1855 to 1972 was a blip on the graph of environmental concern, preceded and followed by more sustainable engagement and a fairer negotiation with the river’s forces and expressions as a whole and natural system, albeit driven by different motivations. Even during this blip, however, several organisations, tried to protect the river’s environmental health from harm. This Tyne study offers a template for a future body of work on British rivers that dislodges the Thames as the river of choice in British environmental history. And it undermines traditional approaches to rivers as passive backdrops of human activities. Departing from narratives that equated change with improvement, or with loss and destruction, it moves away from morally loaded notions of better or worse, and even dead, rivers. The book fully situates the Tyne’s fluvial transformations within political, economic, cultural, social and intellectual contexts. With such a long view, we can objectify ourselves through our descendants’ eyes, reconnecting us not only to our past, but also to our future. Let us sit with the Tyne itself, some of its salmon, a seventeenth-century Tyne River Court Juror, some nineteenth-century Tyne Improvement Commissioners, a 1920s biologist, a twentieth-century Tyne angler, shipbuilder and council planner and some twenty-first-century Tyne Rivers Trust volunteers. Where would they agree and disagree? How would they explain their conceptualisation of what the river is for and how it should be used and regulated? This book takes you to the heart of such virtual debates to revive, reconnect and reinvigorate the severed bonds and flows linking riparian places, issues and people across five centuries.

    • History: specific events & topics
      June 2017

      The Paradoxall Compass

      Journeys at Sea

      by Horatio Morpurgo

      A compelling portrait of the Age of Discovery and its relevance to us today. Morpurgo argues taht even after four centuries, the modern world has not come to terms with the first shock of planetary awareness. He asks how our abusive relationship with the natural world began, and asks what insights we might learn from the great Elizabethan navigators to help us grasp the current environmental crisis.

    • History: specific events & topics
      June 2017

      The Paradoxall Compass

      Journeys at Sea

      by Horatio Morpurgo

      A compelling portrait of the Age of Discovery and its relevance to us today. Morpurgo argues taht even after four centuries, the modern world has not come to terms with the first shock of planetary awareness. He asks how our abusive relationship with the natural world began, and asks what insights we might learn from the great Elizabethan navigators to help us grasp the current environmental crisis.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • History

      400 Moments in 40 Years ( 4 Volumes )

      by Xie Hailong Wang Wenhan

      The 40 years' of Chinese Economic Reform and open up has been a world-shaking change, during which We have been through a change with each passing day, from the Cultural Revolution, breaking down on economics, to become the second world economic entity; from shutting down from the outside to going abroad' from pre-industrial times to the world of Internet. This mysterious miracle forces economic laws out of order, destroys every single foretell that intends to speak ill of China. Regardless of the tedious data and profound theory, let's just brush up the roads we took during the Economic Reform and open up through each snapshot, each familiar face. All of the wonders, confusions, struggles and innovations are injected into the unforgettable 400 moments in 40 years.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Why China did not have a Renaissance – and why that matters

      An interdisciplinary Dialogue

      by Thomas Maissen, Barbara Mittler

      Concepts of historical progress or decline and the idea of a cycle of historical movement have existed in many civilizations. In spite of claims that they be transnational or even universal, periodization schemes invariably reveal specific social and cultural predispositions.Our dialogue, which brings together a Sinologist and a scholar of early modern History in Europe, considers periodization as a historical phenomenon, studying the case of the “Renaissance.” Understood in the tradition of J. Burckhardt, who referred back to ideas voiced by the humanists of the 14th and 15th centuries, and focusing on the particularities of humanist dialogue which informed the making of the “Renaissance” in Italy, our discussion highlights elements that distinguish it from other movements that have proclaimed themselves as “r/Renaissances,” studying, in particular, the Chinese Renaissance in the early 20th century.While disagreeing on several fundamental issues, we suggest that interdisciplinary and interregional dialogue is a format useful to addressing some of the more far-reaching questions in global history, e.g. whether and when a periodization scheme such as “Renaissance” can fruitfully be applied to describe non-European experiences.

    • The Arts
      October 2018

      Reading Room

      Re-Lektüren des Innenraums

      by Christine Göttler, Peter J. Schneemann, Birgitt Borkopp-Restle, Norberto Gramaccini, Peter W. Marx, Bernd Nicolai

      Reading Room erprobt Entwürfe, Theorien und Lektüren des Innenraums von der Frühen Neuzeit bis in die Gegenwart. Ausgangspunkt ist ein dynamisches und relationales Raumkonzept, das die Vielfalt historischer Medien, Kontexte und Diskurse berücksichtigt. Die Beiträge untersuchen die Erzeugung und Umformung von Innenräumen durch soziale Praktiken und visuelle und materielle Strategien. Sie bieten exemplarische Lektüren heterotopischer, dystopischer und utopischer Raumsituationen in Kunst, Architektur und Theater im Spannungsfeld von Innen und Außen, Realität und Repräsentation. Das Buch entwickelt Fragestellungen weiter, die gegenwärtig in der Kunst- und Architekturgeschichte und der Theaterwissenschaft verhandelt werden.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2018

      Westerweel Group: Non-Conformist Resistance against Nazi-Germany

      A Joint Rescue Effort of Dutch Idealists and Dutch-German Zionists

      by Hans Schippers

      The book about the Westerweel Group tells the fascinating story about the cooperation of some ten non-conformist Dutch socialists and a group of Palestine Pioneers who mostly had arrived in the Netherlands from Germany and Austria the late thirties. With the help of Joop Westerweel, the headmaster of a Rotterdam Montessori School, they found hiding places in the Netherlands. Later on, an escape route to France via Belgium was worked out. Posing as Atlantic Wall workers, the pioneers found their way to the south of France. With the help of the Armée Juive, a French Jewish resistance organization, some 70 pioneers reached Spain at the beginning of 1944. From here they went to Palestine. Finding and maintaining the escape route cost the members of the Westerweel Group dear. With some exceptions, all members of the group were arrested by the Germans. Joop Westerweel was executed in August 1944. Other members, both in the Netherlands and France, were send to German concentration camps, where some perished.

    • History
      May 2019

      Freedom Music

      Wales, Emancipation and Jazz 1850-1950

      by Jen Wilson

      This book traces the story of how early African American and jazz music came to Wales. From Abolitionist collaborations, minstrelsy, ‘weird slave songs’, ragtime, blues, hot music and swing, the story unfolds through women’s emancipation and gender politics, social history and the heritage and culture of Wales.

    • African history
      September 2018

      Protection, Patronage, or Plunder? British Machinations and (B)uganda’s Struggle for Independence

      by Author(s): Apollo N. Makubuya

      In the scramble for Africa, Britain took a lion’s share of the continent. It occupied and controlled vast territories, including the Uganda Protectorate – which it ruled for 68 years. Early administrators in the region encountered the progressive kingdom of Buganda, which they incorporated into the British Empire. Under the guise of protection, indirect rule and patronage, Britain overran, plundered and disempowered the kingdom’s traditional institutions. On liquidation of the Empire, Buganda was coaxed into a problematic political order largely dictated from London. Today, 56 years after independence, the kingdom struggles to rediscover itself within Uganda’s fragile politics. Based on newly de-classified records, this book reconstructs a history of the machinations underpinning British imperial interests in (B)Uganda and the personalities who embodied colonial rule. It addresses Anglo-Uganda relations, demonstrating how Uganda’s politics reflects its colonial past, and the forces shaping its future. It is a far-reaching examination of British rule in (B)uganda, questioning whether it was designed for protection, for patronage or for plunder.

    • Society & culture: general
      June 2018

      Feng·Ya·Song

      by Wu Gou

      This is an interesting book dealing with the elegant demeanor and graceful bearing in Song Dynasty. Having the aid of the combination of Song pictures, historical documents and the positive result of the post-research, the author reveals all the aspects of people's daily life in Song Dynasty, full of vim and vigor, showing the social ethos and the spirit of time. The book is divided into six parts in its edition, the first part tells about Song people's daily life; the second, Song people's fined playing and cultivated taste; the third, the social condition; the fourth, the public facilities; the fifth, the commercial prosperity; the last, the communicative protocol. The successive achievements in the book depend on the good treatment of hundreds of Song Pictures and paintings, and at the same time from a few pictures and paintings of the dynasties of Tang, Ming and Qing. Between each other of them, they were made fair comparisons.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      2015

      The Character of China

      by Lou Yulie

      The book is a master work of 50 years’ academic exploration. It is a popularization work which introduces the connotation and humanism of Chinese traditional culture. The professor from PekingU spent 50 years in philosophy studies exploring Chinese culture root from the ups and downs of centuries which made this book into 8 parts: including interpreting the relations of traditional cultural conceptions with the three major ideas’ (Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism) , with the artistic spirit, and with the Chinese medicine.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2020

      New Perspectives on Welsh Industrial History

      by Louise Miskell

      The aim of this volume is to tell a story of Welsh industrial history different to the one traditionally dominated by the coal and iron communities of Victorian and Edwardian Wales. Extending their chronological scope from the early eighteenth- to the late twentieth-century, and encompassing a wider range of industries, the essays in this book combine studies of the internal organisation of workplace and production with outward-facing perspectives of Welsh industry in the context of the global economy. The contributors to the volume offer important new insights into the companies, the employers, the markets and the money behind some of the key sectors of the Welsh economy – from coal to copper, and from steel to manufacturing. By acknowledging the numerical significance but often unsung importance of the thousands who worked in domestic service, the book challenges us also to reconsider what we think of as constituting ‘industry’ in Wales.

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