• Regional & national history
      February 2019

      Arthur in the Celtic Languages

      The Arthurian Legend in Celtic Literature and Traditions

      by Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan and Erich Poppe

      A collection of essays providing a reliable, accessible and up-to-date introduction to Arthurian literature and popular traditions in the Celtic languages, from the early Middle Ages to the twentieth century. The figure of Arthur and the characters associated with him change as the stories are reworked for audiences in the different countries and at different periods.

    • Medieval history
      March 2019

      Colonizing Christianity

      Greek and Latin Religious Identity in the Era of the Fourth Crusade

      by George E. Demacopoulos

      Colonizing Christianity employs postcolonial critique to analyze the transformations of Greek and Latin religious identity in the wake of the Fourth Crusade. Through close readings of texts from the period of Latin occupation, this book argues that the experience of colonization splintered the Greek community over how best to respond to the Latin other while illuminating the mechanisms by which Western Christians authorized and exploited the Christian East. The experience of colonial subjugation opened permanent fissures within the Orthodox community, which struggled to develop a consistent response to aggressive demands for submission to the Roman Church.

    • Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500
      October 2019

      Whose Middle Ages?

      Teachable Moments for an Ill-Used Past

      by Andrew Albin, Mary C. Erler, Thomas O'Donnell, Nicholas L. Paul, Nina Rowe, David Perry, Geraldine Heng, Sandy Bardsley, Fred Donner, Nicholas L. Paul, Cord Whitaker, Magda Teter, W. Ormrod, Katherine Wilson, Ryan Szpiech, William Diebold, Lauren Mancia, Stephennie Mulder, Sarah Guérin, Pamela Patton, Elizabeth Tyler, David Wacks, Marian Bleeke, Andrew Reeves, Will Cerbone, Maggie Williams, Helen Young, Adam Bishop, J. Patrick Hornbeck II

      Whose Middle Ages? is an ideal course reader, featuring scholarship on the Middle Ages and the misuses of medievalism from across fields and disciplines including history, literature, religion and theology, art history, critical race studies, labor and economic history, gender and sexuality, Crusades studies, migration studies, Islamic studies, and more

    • History
      October 2019

      The Economy of Medieval Wales, 1067-1536

      by Matthew Frank Stevens

      This book surveys the economy of Wales from Norman invasion to Anglo-Welsh union. Key themes include the evolution of the agrarian economy; the growth of towns; the adoption of a money economy; English colonization; the collapse of native Welsh social structures and the rise of economic individualism; the disastrous effect of the Glyndŵr rebellion; and alignment with the English economy.

    • European history
      August 2011

      City of Fortune

      How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire

      by Roger Crowley

      A magisterial work of gripping history, City of Fortune tells the story of the Venetian ascent from lagoon dwellers to the greatest power in the Mediterranean - an epic five hundred year voyage that encompassed crusade and trade, plague, sea battles and colonial adventure.In Venice, the path to empire unfolded in a series of extraordinary contests - the sacking of Constantinople in 1204, the fight to the finish with Genoa and a desperate defence against the Turks. Under the lion banner of St Mark, she created an empire of ports and naval bases which funnelled the goods of the world through its wharfs. In the process the city became the richest place on earth - a brilliant mosaic fashioned from what it bought, traded, borrowed and stole.Based on first hand accounts of trade and warfare, seafaring and piracy and the places where Venetians sailed and died, City of Fortune is narrative history at its finest. Beginning on Ascension Day in the year 1000 and ending with an explosion off the coast of Greece - and the calamitous news that the Portuguese had pioneered a sea route to India - it will fascinate anyone who loves Venice and the Mediterranean world.

    • Medieval history
      May 2012

      An Introduction to the 'Glossa Ordinaria' as Medieval Hypertext

      by David A. Salomon (Author)

      The Glossa Ordinaria, the medieval glossed Bible first printed in 1480/81, has been a rich source of biblical commentary for centuries. Circulated first in manuscript, the text is the Latin Vulgate Bible of St. Jerome with patristic commentary both in the margins and within the text itself. This study, the first of its kind, introduces the reader to the Glossa Ordinaria both historically and through the lens of contemporary hypertext theory, arguing that the Glossa Ordinaria is a hypertext of the mind. By application of ancient, medieval and modern theories, this study encourages the reader to engage the Glossa Ordinaria in new and exciting ways. This book serves both as primer on the Glossa Ordinaria and examination of the text in light of modern theories.

    • Medieval history
      May 2012

      An Introduction to the 'Glossa Ordinaria' as Medieval Hypertext

      by David A. Salomon (Author)

      The Glossa Ordinaria, the medieval glossed Bible first printed in 1480/81, has been a rich source of biblical commentary for centuries. Circulated first in manuscript, the text is the Latin Vulgate Bible of St. Jerome with patristic commentary both in the margins and within the text itself. This study, the first of its kind, introduces the reader to the Glossa Ordinaria both historically and through the lens of contemporary hypertext theory, arguing that the Glossa Ordinaria is a hypertext of the mind. By application of ancient, medieval and modern theories, this study encourages the reader to engage the Glossa Ordinaria in new and exciting ways. This book serves both as primer on the Glossa Ordinaria and examination of the text in light of modern theories.

    • Medieval history
      June 2012

      Reading Medieval Anchoritism

      Ideology and Spiritual Practices

      by Mari Hughes-Edwards

      This interdisciplinary study of medieval English anchoritism from 1080-1450, explodes the myth of the anchorhold as solitary death-cell, reveals it instead as the site of potential intellectual exchange, and demonstrates an anchoritic spirituality in synch with the wider medieval world.

    • Medieval history
      June 2012

      Reading Medieval Anchoritism

      Ideology and Spiritual Practices

      by Mari Hughes-Edwards (Author)

      Medieval anchorites willingly embraced the most extreme form of solitude known to the medieval world, so they might forge a closer connection with God. Yet to be physically enclosed within the same four walls for life required strength far beyond most medieval Christians. This book explores the English anchoritic guides which were written, revised and translated, throughout the Middle Ages, to enable recluses to come to terms with the enormity of their choices. The book explores five centuries of the guides’ negotiations of four anchoritic ideals: enclosure, solitude, chastity and orthodoxy, and of two vital anchoritic spiritual practices: asceticism and contemplative experience. It explodes the myth of the anchorhold as solitary death-cell, revealing it as the site of potential intellectual exchange and spiritual growth.

    • Medieval history
      October 2012

      Wales and the Crusades

      c. 1095-1291

      by Kathryn Hurlock

      This original study, focussing on the impact of the crusading movement in medieval Wales, considers both the enthusiasm of the Welsh and those living in Wales and its borders for the crusades, as well as the domestic impact of the movement on warfare, literature, politics and patronage. The location of Wales on the periphery of mainstream Europe, and its perceived status as religiously and culturally underdeveloped did not make it the most obvious candidate for crusading involvement, but this study demonstrates that both native and settler took part in the crusades, supported the military orders, and wrote about events in the Holy Land. Efforts were made to recruit the Welsh in 1188, suggesting contemporary appreciation for Welsh fighting skills, even though crusaders from Wales have been overlooked in modern studies. By looking at patterns of participation this study shows how domestic warfare influenced the desire and willingness to join the crusade, and the effect of such absences on the properties of those who did go. The difference between north and south Wales, Marcher lord and native prince, Flemish noble and minor landholder are considered to show how crusading affected a broad spread of society. Finally, the political role of crusading participation as a way to remove potential troublemakers and cement English control over Wales is considered as the close of the peak years of crusading coincided with the final conquest of Wales in 1282.

    • Education
      February 2001

      Medieval Education

      by Edited by Ronald B. Begley, and Joseph W. Koterski, S.J.

      This volume offers original studies on the subject of medieval education, not only in the formal academic sense typical of schools and universities but also in a broader cultural sense that includes law, liturgy, and the new religious orders of the high Middle Ages. Its essays explore the transmission of knowledge during the middle ages in various kinds of educational communities, including schools, scriptoria, universities, and workshops.

    • Archaeology by period / region

      Aztec Ceremonial Landscape

      by William L. Fash (Foreword), David Carrasco (Author, Editor)

      Contents: Notes on the Oldest Structure of El Tempo Mayor at Tenochtitlan; A Study of Skeletal Materials from Tlatelolco; Discovery of a Painted Mural at Tlatelolco; The Mt. Tlaloc Project; The Sacrifice of Tezcatlipoca -- To Change Place; Mapping the Ritual Landscape -- Debt Payment to Tlaloc During the Month of Atlcahualo; The Sacred Landscape of Aztec Calendar Festivals -- Myth, Nature and Society; Migration Histories as Ritual Performance; The Myth of the Half-Man Who Descended from the Sky; The Octli Cult in Late Pre-Hispanic Central Mexico; Dryness Before the Rains -- Taxcatl and Tezcatlipoca; Reflection on the Miraculous Waters of Tenochtitlan; Vamos a Rezar a San Marcos -- A Tlapanec Pilgrimage; Eating Landscape -- Human Sacrifice and Sustenance in Aztec Mexico; Religious Rationalisation and the Conversions of the Nahuas -- Social Organisation and Colonial Epistemology; Remnants of the Shaman.

    • Archaeology by period / region

      Moctezuma's Mexico

      Visions of the Aztec World, Revised Edition

      by David Carrasco

      Updated with a new chapter by Davíd Carrasco describing how the Aztec world has been re-imagined by modern Mexican American communities and Chicano scholars, 'Moctezuma's Mexico' is a lavishly illustrated volume that provides an in-depth historical profile of the Aztec empire on the eve of its fateful encounter with the Europeans. Beginning with an exploration of Aztec history and cosmovision, the authors and two other prominent scholars-Anthony Aveni and Elizabeth Hill Boone-examine Aztec ceremonies, astronomy, myths, rhetoric, and moral philosophy, as well as controversies in recent Aztec scholarship using poetry, sculpture, painting, and the archaeological record. With nearly 150 full-colour illustrations, 'Moctezuma's Mexico' is an important and handsome book that will appeal to scholars and students of Mexico's indigenous past.

    • Archaeology by period / region

      Commoner Ritual and Ideology in Ancient Mesoamerica

      by Nancy Gonlin (Editor) , Jon C Lohse (Editor)

      Were most commoners in ancient Mesoamerica poor? In a material sense, yes, probably so. Were they poor in their beliefs and culture? Certainly not, as "Commoner Ritual and Ideology in Ancient Mesoamerica" demonstrates. This volume explores the ritual life of Mesoamerica's common citizens, inside and outside of the domestic sphere, from Formative through Postclassic periods. Building from the premise that ritual and ideological expression inhered at all levels of society in Mesoamerica, the contributors demonstrate that ideology did not emanate solely from exalted individuals and that commoner ritual expression was not limited to household contexts. Taking an empirical approach to this under-studied and under-theorised area, contributors use material evidence to discover how commoner status conditioned the expression of ideas and values. Revealing complex social hierarchies that varied across time and region, this volume offers theoretical approaches to commoner ideology, religious practice, and socio-political organisation and builds a framework for future study of the correlation of ritual and ideological expression with social position for Mesoamericanists and archaeologists worldwide.

    • Archaeology

      The Incas

      by Nigel Davies

      The Inca Empire's immense territory spanned more than 2,000 miles -- from Ecuador to Chile -- at the time of the Spanish invasion, yet Inca culture remains largely a mystery. The Incas did not leave pictorial codices and documents in their native language as the Maya and Aztec did and they narrated to Spanish chroniclers just a few of the multiple alternative histories maintained by descendants of various rulers. In this classic work, Nigel Davies offers a clear view into Inca political history, economy, governance, religion, art, architecture, and daily life. The Incas has become a classic in its ten years in print; readers and scholars interested in ancient American cultures will relish this new paperback edition.

    • History of the Americas

      Invasion and Transformation

      Interdisciplinary Perspectives On the Conquest of Mexico

      by Rebecca P Brienen

      This book examines the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire and transformations in political, social, cultural, and religious life in Mexico during the Conquest and the ensuing colonial period. In particular, contributors consider the ways in which the Conquest itself was remembered, both in its immediate aftermath and in later centuries. Was Moteuczoma really as weak as history portrayed him? As Susan D Gillespie instead suggests in 'Blaming Moteuczoma', the representation of Moteuczoma as a scapegoat for the Aztec defeat can be understood as a product of indigenous resistance and accommodation following the imposition of Spanish colonialism. Chapters address the various roles (real and imagined) of Moteuczoma, Cortés, and Malinche in the fall of the Aztecs; the representation of history in colonial art; and the complex cultural transformations that actually took place.

    • Geographical discovery & exploration

      Coronado Expedition to Tierra Nueva

      The 1540-1542 Route Across the Southwest

      by Richard Flint , Shirley Cushing Flint

      The Coronado Expedition to Tierra Nueva is an engaging record of key research by archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, and geographers concerning the first organised European entrance into what is now the American Southwest and northwestern Mexico. In search of where the expedition went and what peoples it encountered, this volume explores the fertile valleys of Sonora, the basins and ranges of southern Arizona, the Zuni pueblos and the Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, and the Llano Estacado of the Texas panhandle. The twenty-one contributors to the volume have pursued some of the most significant lines of research in the field in the last fifty years; their techniques range from documentary analysis and recording traditional stories to detailed examination of the landscape and excavation of campsites and Indian towns. With more confidence than ever before, researchers are closing in on the route of the conquistadors.

    • Archaeology

      Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl

      The Once & Future Lord of the Toltecs

      by H B Nicholson

      This is the most comprehensive survey and discussion of the primary documentary sources and the relevant archaeological evidence concerning the most enigmatic figure of ancient Mesoamerica. Probably no indigenous New World personage has aroused more interest or more controversy than this Lord of Tollan, capital of the Toltec Empire, who was merged with the prominent Feathered Serpent god, Quetzalcoatl. Professor Nicholson sorts through this wealth of material, classifying, summarising, and analysing all known primary accounts of the career of Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl, in the Spanish, Nahuatl, and Mayan languages, which Spanish missionaries and Spanish-educated natives recorded after the Conquest. In a new Introduction, he updates the original source material presently available to scholars concerned with this figure. After careful consideration of the evidence, he concludes that, in spite of the obvious myth surrounding this renowned Toltec priest-ruler, at least some of Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl's recorded life and deeds are drawn from historical fact. Nicholson also contends that the tradition of his expected return probably played a role in the peaceable reception of Cortés by Moctezuma II in Mexico's Tenochtitlan in the fall of 1519. Includes new illustrations and an index.

    • Archaeology by period / region

      Mesoamerica's Classic Heritage

      From Teotihuacan to the Aztecs

      by Davíd Carrasco , Lindsay Jones , Scott Sessions

      For more than a millennium the great Mesoamerican city of Teotihuacan (c. 150 B.C.E. - 750 C.E.) has been imagined and reimagined by a host of subsequent cultures, including our own. Mesoamerica's Classic Heritage engages the subject of the unity and diversity of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica by focusing on the classic heritage of this ancient city. This new volume is the product of several years of research by members of Princeton University's Moses Mesoamerican Archive and Research Project and Mexico's Proyecto Teotihuacán. Offering a variety of disciplinary perspectives - including the history of religions, anthropology, archaeology, and art history - and a wealth of new data, Mesoamerica's Classic Heritage examines Teotihuacan's rippling influence across Mesoamerican time and space, including important patterns of continuity and change, and its relationships, both historical and symbolic, with Tenochtitlan, Cholula, and various Maya communities. The contributors to Mesoamerica's Classic Heritage offer a wide range of individual interpretations, but they agree that Teotihuacan, more than any other pre-Hispanic center, was a paradigmatic source that formed the art and architecture, cosmology and ritual life, and conceptions of urbanism and political authority for significant parts of the Mesoamerican world. This great city achieved the prestige of being the site of the creation of the cosmos and of effective social and political space in Mesoamerica through its capacity to symbolize, perform, and export its imperial authority. These essays reveal the different ways in which Teotihuacan's classic heritage both fed and fed on the dynamic interactivity of the entire area. Whether or not a paradigm shift in Mesoamerican studies is taking place, certainly a new contextual understanding of Teotihuacan and the diversities and unities of Mesoamerica is emerging in these pages.

    • History of the Americas

      The Lords of Lambityeco

      Political Evolution in the Valley of Oaxaca During the Xoo Phase

      by Michael Lind

      The Valley of Oaxaca was unified under the rule of Monte Albán until its collapse around AD 800. Using findings from John Paddock's long-term excavations at Lambityeco from 1961 to 1976, Michael Lind and Javier Urcid examine the political and social organisation of the ancient community during the Xoo Phase (Late Classic period). Focusing on change within this single archaeological period rather than between time periods, The Lords of Lambityeco traces the changing political relationships between Lambityeco and Monte Albán that led to the fall of the Zapotec state. Using detailed analysis of elite and common houses, tombs, and associated artefacts, the authors demonstrate increased political control by Monte Albán over Lambityeco prior to the abandonment of both settlements. Lambityeco is the most thoroughly researched Classic period site in the valley after Monte Albán, but only a small number of summary articles have been published about this important locale. This, in combination with Lambityeco's status as a secondary centre -- one that allows for greater understanding of core and periphery dynamics in the Monte Albán state -- makes "The Lords of Lambityeco" a welcome and significant contribution to the literature on ancient Mesoamerica.

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