• History
      September 2016

      Destroyer of the gods

      Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World

      by Larry W. Hurtado

      "Silly," "stupid," "irrational," "simple." "Wicked," "hateful," "obstinate," "anti-social." "Extravagant," "perverse." The Roman world rendered harsh judgments upon early Christianity—including branding Christianity "new." Novelty was no Roman religious virtue.Nevertheless, as Larry W. Hurtado shows in Destroyer of the gods, Christianity thrived despite its new and distinctive features and opposition to them. Unlike nearly all other religious groups, Christianity utterly rejected the traditional gods of the Roman world. Christianity also offered a new and different kind of religious identity, one not based on ethnicity. Christianity was distinctively a "bookish" religion, with the production, copying, distribution, and reading of texts as central to its faith, even preferring a distinctive book-form, the codex. Christianity insisted that its adherents behave differently: unlike the simple ritual observances characteristic of the pagan religious environment, embracing Christian faith meant a behavioral transformation, with particular and novel ethical demands for men. Unquestionably, to the Roman world, Christianity was both new and different, and, to a good many, it threatened social and religious conventions of the day.In the rejection of the gods and in the centrality of texts, early Christianity obviously reflected commitments inherited from its Jewish origins. But these particular features were no longer identified with Jewish ethnicity and early Christianity quickly became aggressively trans-ethnic—a novel kind of religious movement. Its ethical teaching, too, bore some resemblance to the philosophers of the day, yet in contrast with these great teachers and their small circles of dedicated students, early Christianity laid its hard demands upon all adherents from the moment of conversion, producing a novel social project. Christianity’s novelty was no badge of honor. Called atheists and suspected of political subversion, Christians earned Roman disdain and suspicion in equal amounts. Yet, as Destroyer of the gods demonstrates, in an irony of history the very features of early Christianity that rendered it distinctive and objectionable in Roman eyes have now become so commonplace in Western culture as to go unnoticed. Christianity helped destroy one world and create another. ; PrefaceIntroductionChapter 1. Early Christians and Christianity in the Eyes of Non-ChristiansChapter 2. A New Kind of FaithChapter 3. A Different IdentityChapter 4. A "Bookish" ReligionChapter 5. A New Way to LiveConclusionAppendixNotesIndex of Ancient SourcesIndex of Subjects and Modern Authors

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      April 2019

      Rome and The Guidebook Tradition

      From the Middle Ages to the 20th Century

      by Anna Blennow, Stefano Fogelberg Rota

      To this day, no comprehensive academic study of the development of guidebooks to Rome over time has been performed. This book treats the history of guidebooks to Rome from the Middle Ages up to the early twentieth century. It is based on the results of the interdisciplinary research project Topos and Topography, led by Anna Blennow and Stefano Fogelberg Rota. From the case studies performed within the project, it becomes evident that the guidebook as a phenomenon was formed in Rome during the later Middle Ages and early Renaissance. The elements and rhetorical strategies of guidebooks over time have shown to be surprisingly uniform, with three important points of development: a turn towards a more user-friendly structure from the seventeenth century and onward; the so-called ’Baedeker effect’ in the mid-nineteenth century; and the introduction of a personalized guiding voice in the first half of the twentieth century. Thus, the ‘guidebook tradition’ is an unusually consistent literary oeuvre, which also forms a warranty for the authority of every new guidebook. In this respect, the guidebook tradition is intimately associated with the city of Rome, with which it shares a constantly renovating yet eternally fixed nature.

    • Archaeology
      April 2012

      Carnegie Maya IV

      The Carnegie Institution of Washington Theoretical Approaches to Problems, 1941-1947

      by John M Weeks

      This is the fourth in a series of volumes that make available the primary data and interpretative studies originally produced by archaeologists and anthropologists in the Maya region under the umbrella of the Carnegie Institute of Washington's Division of Historical Research. Collected together here are the "Theoretical Approaches to Problems" papers, a series that published preliminary conclusions to advance thought processes and stimulate debate. Although two of the three theories published in these reports have since been proven wrong, the theories themselves remain significant because of their impact on the direction of archaeology. Only a few sets of these three contributions to the "Theoretical Approaches to Problems" series are known to have survived, making "The Carnegie Maya IV" an essential reference and research resource. The corresponding ebook contains the complete set of "The Carnegie Maya", "The Carnegie Maya II", "The Carnegie Maya III", and "The Carnegie Maya IV", thus making hundreds of documents from the Carnegie Institution's Maya program available in one source.

    • History of Art: Ancient & Classical Art, BCE to c.500 CE

      The Hidden Life of Ancient Egypt

      Decoding the Secrets of a Lost World

      by Clare Gibson

      The Hidden Life of Ancient Egypt' explores in stunning images and straightforward language how the symbolism encoded in the art and artefacts of this great empire can be the key to understanding the rites, thoughts, and daily life of ancient Egyptians.

    • Ancient history: to c 500 CE

      The Last Frontier

      The Roman Invasions of Scotland

      by Antony. Kamm

    • African history
      January 2013

      Black Egyptians

      The African Origins of Ancient Egypt

      by Segun Magbagbeola

    • Anthologies (non-poetry)

      The Beginnings of Chinese Civilization

      by Chi Li (author)

      An anthology of archaeological and anthropological writings in English by Li Chi, the founding father of China’s modern archaeology Tracing back the rise of Chinese civilization as well as the origin of its people Briefing the rise of China’s archaeology as a scientific subject owing to the confluence of the methods of fieldwork from the West and the traditional antiquarian studies

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2017

      Friendship among nations

      History of a concept

      by Evgeny Roshchin

      This is the first book-length study of the role that friendship plays in diplomacy and international politics. Through an examination of a vast amount of sources ranging from diplomatic letters and bilateral treaties, to poems and philosophical treatises, it analyses how friendship has been talked about and practiced in pre-modern political orders and modern systems of international relations. The study highlights how instrumental friendship was for describing and legitimising a range of political and legal engagements with foreign countries and nations. It emphasises contractual and political aspects in diplomatic friendship based on the idea of utility.

    • Ancient history: to c 500 CE
      September 2017

      The "Birth" of Italy

      The Institutionalization of Italy as a Region, 3rd-1st Century BCE

      by Carlà-Uhink, Filippo

      Die Klio-Beihefte wurden 1903 gegründet und etablierten sich rasch als eine der führenden Reihen auf dem Feld der historischen Altertumswissenschaften. Nach jahrzehntelanger Unterbrechung erscheinen sie wieder seit 1999 als „Neue Folge“ und geben herausragenden Forschungen zur Geschichte der griechischen und römischen Welt ein geeignetes Forum. Dies gilt für das gesamte Spektrum von stärker quellenbasierten bis zu prononciert theoriegeleiteten Untersuchungen sowie für innovative Studien aus den Nachbardisziplinen der Alten Geschichte.

    • Ancient history: to c 500 CE
      September 2017

      The "Birth" of Italy

      The Institutionalization of Italy as a Region, 3rd-1st Century BCE

      by Carlà-Uhink, Filippo

      Die Klio-Beihefte wurden 1903 gegründet und etablierten sich rasch als eine der führenden Reihen auf dem Feld der historischen Altertumswissenschaften. Nach jahrzehntelanger Unterbrechung erscheinen sie wieder seit 1999 als „Neue Folge“ und geben herausragenden Forschungen zur Geschichte der griechischen und römischen Welt ein geeignetes Forum. Dies gilt für das gesamte Spektrum von stärker quellenbasierten bis zu prononciert theoriegeleiteten Untersuchungen sowie für innovative Studien aus den Nachbardisziplinen der Alten Geschichte.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2017

      Christian Martyrdom in Late Antiquity (300-450 AD)

      History and Discourse, Tradition and Religious Identity

      by Peter Gemeinhardt, Johan Leemans

      The present volume’s focus lies on the formation of a multifaccetted discourse on Christian martyrdom in Late Antiquity. While martyrdom accounts remain a central means of defining Christian identity, new literary genres emerge, e.g., the Lives of Saints (Athanasius on Antony), sermons (the Cappadocians), hynms (Prudentius) and more. Authors like Eusebius of Caesarea and Augustine employ martyrological language and motifs in their apologetical and polemic writings, while the Gesta Martyrum Romanorum represent a new type of veneration of the martyrs of a single site. Beyond the borders of the Roman Empire, new martyrs’ narratives can be found. Additionally, two essays deal with methodological questions of research of such sources, thereby highlighting the hitherto understudied innovations of martyrology in Late Antiquity, that is, after the end of the persecutions of Christianity by Roman Emperors. Since then, martyrology gained new importance for the formation of Christian identity within the context of a Christianized imperium. The volume thus enlarges and specifies our knowledge of this fundamental Christian discourse.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2012

      Studies in Byzantine Sigillography. Volume 11

      by Jean-Claude Cheynet, Claudia Sode

      For several years now, sigillography as an independent subarea in the field of Byzantine studies has received increasing attention from both Byzantine studies and related disciplines, because it is the only area still able to provide academia with large amounts of material not previously analysed. The articles of Studies in Byzantine Sigillography deal with all aspects of Byzantine sigillography: presentation of new finds, discussion of new methods, questions of the political and ecclesiastical administration of Byzantinum, prosopography, historical geography, and art historical and iconographical problems. In addition, the volumes contain a loosely arranged list of Byzantine seals, which have been published in essays and auction catalogues, thus enabling those from more obscure publications to be located and identified.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2000

      Skaldsagas

      Text, Vocation, and Desire in the Icelandic Sagas of Poets

      by Russell Gilbert Poole

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2000

      Biographischer Index der Antike / Biographical Index of the Classical World

      by Hilmar Schmuck

      Also available as "World Biographical Index" Online and on CD-ROM

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      November 2000

      Onomasticon to the Younger Pliny

      Letters and Panegyric

      by Anthony R. Birley

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      January 1996

      Onomasticon to Cicero's Treatises

      by David R. Shackleton Bailey

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2010

      The Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum

      Archaeology, Reception, and Digital Reconstruction

      by Mantha Zarmakoupi

      The Villa of the Papyri is a unique archaeological site and has been very influential in the field of classical studies. The papyri (the only intact library to survive from Greco-Roman antiquity) and bronze sculptures found in the villa have contributed to our knowledge of the ancient world and the villa has become for us the “ideal model” of Roman luxury villa culture.This volume brings together papers delivered by experts in various fields addressing the cultural significance of this ancient site in its contemporary Roman context as well as its cultural reception from its discovery over two hundred and fifty years ago to the most recent excavations in the late twentieth century. They also explore the ways in which digital archaeology can assist our efforts to understand and investigate ancient sites. Topics treated include the Villa’s architecture, decoration, and content (i.e., wall-paintings, sculptures, and papyri); their reception since the 18th century; and the current state of knowledge based on the recent partial excavations in the Villa, presented here in English for the first time. Furthermore, the use of digital models of the Villa that incorporate the data from the new excavations and a discussion on the ways in which such models may be used for educational and research purposes are also presented.

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