• General & world history

      A Greater Love

      by Olga Watkins

      The true story of a woman's incredible journey into the heart of the Third Reich to find the man she loves. When the Gestapo seize 20-year-old Olga Czepf's fiance she is determined to find him and sets off on an extraordinary 2,000-mile search across Nazi-occupied Europe risking betrayal, arrest and death. As the Second World War heads towards its bloody climax, she refuses to give up - even when her mission leads her to the gates of Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps... Now 89 and living in London, Olga tells with remarkable clarity of the courage and determination that drove her across war-torn Europe, to find the man she loved. The greatest untold true love story of World War Two.

    • 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000

      Finish Forty and Home

      The Untold World War II Story of B-24s in the Pacific

      by Phil Scearce

      Finish Forty and Home was selected as a title within the Best of the Best from University Presses 2012 program and presented at the annual American Library Association conference. During the early years of World War II in the Pacific theatre, against overwhelming odds, young American airmen flew the longest and most perilous bombing missions of the war. They faced determined Japanese fighters without fighter escort, relentless anti-aircraft fire with no deviations from target, and thousands of miles of over-water flying with no alternative landing sites. Finish Forty and Home, by Phil Scearce, is the true story of the men and missions of the 11th Bombardment Group as it fought alone and unheralded in the South Central Pacific, while America had its eyes on the war in Europe. The book opens with Sgt. Herman Scearce, the author’s father, lying about his age to join the Army Air Corps at 16. The narrative follows Scearce through training and into combat with his new crewmates, including pilot Lt. Joe Deasy, whose last-minute transfer from training duty thrusts the new crew into the squadron commander’s role. Inexperienced crews are pressed into combat with navigational training inadequate for the great distances flown over Pacific routes, and losses mount. Finish Forty and Home takes the reader into combat with B-24 Liberator bomber crews facing the perils of long missions against tiny Japanese-held island targets. After new crews assembled into a squadron on Hawaii, they are sent on a mission to bomb Nauru. Soon the squadron moves on to bomb Wake Island, Tarawa, and finally Iwo Jima. These missions bring American forces closer and closer to the Japanese home islands and precede the critical American invasions of Tarawa and Iwo Jima. The 42nd Squadron’s losses through 1943 were staggering: 50 out of 110 airmen killed. Phil Scearce explores the context of the war and sets the stage for these daring missions, revealing the motivations of the men who flew them: to finish forty combat missions and make it home again. He based his story upon substantial research at the Air Force Historical Research Agency and the National Archives, interviews with surviving airmen, and interviews and correspondence with the survivors of men who were lost. His is the first book to document America’s bomber offensive in the early days of the Pacific War.

    • 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000
      May 2011

      WWII Voices

      by Hilary Kaiser

      These oral histories give voice to both American veterans who chose to reside in France after World War II and to French women who married GIs and subsequently emigrated to the United States. Author Hilary Kaiser introduces us into the lives of seventeen soldiers of various ethnicity, gender and rank, and revisits their diverse experience as American servicemen in WWII France. Ms. Kaiser elicits fascinating and candid first person narratives of the key wartime events which transformed the lives of these men and women. Each chapter constitutes an inspirational short story starting with WWII and ending with the present day status of these unsung heroes and the women who loved them. Anyone with an interest in WWII and its effects on the lives of ordinary men and women will thoroughly enjoy this book

    • History

      AmaZizi: the Dlamini of Southern Africa 2nd Ed

      by Jongisilo Z. Z. Pokwana Ka Menziwa, Ngangomzi Pokwana Ah! Jongumhlaba

      The Dlamini people are a stock race that, during the 19th century, spread throughout the then largely uninhabited Southern Africa. Today they can be found concentrated in Swaziland, in the Eastern Cape, in KwaZulu Natal and in many other parts of the country. The first edition traced a story of these people from before 2000 years ago until today, then focused on a section of the Dlamini known as AmaZizi. The second edition expands this base with new research and information. If you have the surname Dlamini, the history and traditions of your ancestors can be found within these pages.

    • History
      September 2016

      Destroyer of the gods

      Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World

      by Larry W. Hurtado

      "Silly," "stupid," "irrational," "simple." "Wicked," "hateful," "obstinate," "anti-social." "Extravagant," "perverse." The Roman world rendered harsh judgments upon early Christianity—including branding Christianity "new." Novelty was no Roman religious virtue.Nevertheless, as Larry W. Hurtado shows in Destroyer of the gods, Christianity thrived despite its new and distinctive features and opposition to them. Unlike nearly all other religious groups, Christianity utterly rejected the traditional gods of the Roman world. Christianity also offered a new and different kind of religious identity, one not based on ethnicity. Christianity was distinctively a "bookish" religion, with the production, copying, distribution, and reading of texts as central to its faith, even preferring a distinctive book-form, the codex. Christianity insisted that its adherents behave differently: unlike the simple ritual observances characteristic of the pagan religious environment, embracing Christian faith meant a behavioral transformation, with particular and novel ethical demands for men. Unquestionably, to the Roman world, Christianity was both new and different, and, to a good many, it threatened social and religious conventions of the day.In the rejection of the gods and in the centrality of texts, early Christianity obviously reflected commitments inherited from its Jewish origins. But these particular features were no longer identified with Jewish ethnicity and early Christianity quickly became aggressively trans-ethnic—a novel kind of religious movement. Its ethical teaching, too, bore some resemblance to the philosophers of the day, yet in contrast with these great teachers and their small circles of dedicated students, early Christianity laid its hard demands upon all adherents from the moment of conversion, producing a novel social project. Christianity’s novelty was no badge of honor. Called atheists and suspected of political subversion, Christians earned Roman disdain and suspicion in equal amounts. Yet, as Destroyer of the gods demonstrates, in an irony of history the very features of early Christianity that rendered it distinctive and objectionable in Roman eyes have now become so commonplace in Western culture as to go unnoticed. Christianity helped destroy one world and create another. ; PrefaceIntroductionChapter 1. Early Christians and Christianity in the Eyes of Non-ChristiansChapter 2. A New Kind of FaithChapter 3. A Different IdentityChapter 4. A "Bookish" ReligionChapter 5. A New Way to LiveConclusionAppendixNotesIndex of Ancient SourcesIndex of Subjects and Modern Authors

    • Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500
      June 2011

      A History of Everyday Life in Medieval Scotland

      by Edward J Cowan, Lizanne Henderson

      This book examines the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of people in Scotland from the earliest times to 1600. Its purpose is to discover the character of everyday life in Scotland over time and to do so, where possible, within a comparative context. Its focus is on the mundane, but at the same time it takes heed of the people’s experience of wars, famine, environmental disaster and other major causes of disturbance, and assesses the effects of longer-term processes of change in religion, politics, and economic and social affairs. In showing how the extraordinary impinged on the everyday, the book draws on every possible kind of evidence including a diverse range of documentary sources, artefactual, environmental and archaeological material, and the published work of many disciplines. The authors explore the lives of all the people of Scotland and provide unique insights into how the experience of daily life varied across time according to rank, class, gender, age, religion and ethnic group. They look at the contextual nature of everyday experience and consider how this was shaped by national, regional and tribal considerations. They reveal the variations between Highland and Lowland, the Western Isles and the Northern Isles, inland and coastal, and urban and rural. They examine the role played by language, whether Gaelic, Welsh, English, Pictish, Norse, Latin or Scots. The book shows the distinctively Scottish aspects of diurnal life and how, through trading and contact with migrants, the lives of Scots were affected by other cultures and nations. Taken as a whole it represents a new way of looking at medieval Scotland and has implications and relevance for historians and their public across the discipline. ; This book examines the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of people in Scotland from the earliest times to 1600. ; Contents List of Figures Series Editors' Forward Christopher A. Whatley and Elizabeth Foyster Introduction: Everyday Life in Medieval Scotland Edward J. Cowan and Lizanne Henderson Chapter 1. Landscape and People Fiona Watson Chapter 2. The Worldview of Scottish Vikings in the Age of the Sagas Edward J. Cowan Chapter 3. Sacred and Banal: The Discovery of Everyday Medieval Material Culture Jenny Shiels and Stuart Campbell Chapter 4. The Family David Sellar Chapter 5. 'Hamperit in ane hony came': Sights, Sounds and Smells in the Medieval Town Elizabeth Ewan Chapter 6. Playtime Everday: The Material Culture of Medieval Gaming Mark Hall Chapter 7. Women of Independence in Barbour's Bruce and Blind Harry's Wallace Rebecca Boorsma Chapter 8. Everyday Life in the Histories of Scotland from Walter Bower to George Buchanan Nicola Royan Chapter 9. Disease, Death and the Hereafter in Medieval Scotland Richard D. Oram Chapter 10. 'Detestable Slaves of the Devil': Changing Ideas about Witchcraft in Sixteenth-Century Scotland Lizanne Henderson Chapter 11. Glasgwegians: The First One Thousand Years Edward J. Cowan Chapter 12. Marian Devotion in Scotland and the Shrine of Loreto Audrey-Beth Fitch Annotated Bibliography Notes on the Contributors Index

    • History of other lands
      April 2014

      Courts and Elites in the Hellenistic Empires

      The Near East After the Achaemenids, c. 330 to 30 BCE

      by Rolf Strootman

      Rolf Strootman brings together various aspects of court culture in the Macedonian empires of the post-Achaemenid Near East. During the Hellenistic Period (c. 330-30 BCE), Alexander the Great and his successors reshaped their Persian and Greco-Macedonian legacies to create a new kind of rulership that was neither ‘western’ nor ‘eastern’ and would profoundly influence the later development of court culture and monarchy in both the Roman West and Iranian East. Drawing on the socio-political models of Norbert Elias and Charles Tilly, After the Achaemenids shows how the Hellenistic dynastic courts were instrumental in the integration of local elites in the empires, and the (re)distribution of power, wealth, and status. It analyses the competition among courtiers for royal favour and the, not always successful, attempts of the Hellenistic rulers to use these struggles to their own advantage. It demonstrates the interrelationships of the three competing ‘Hellenistic’ empires of the Seleukids, Antigonids and Ptolemies, casts new light on the phenomenon of Hellenistic Kingship by approaching it from the angle of the court and covers topics such as palace architecture, royal women, court ceremonial, and coronation ritual. ; Rolf Strootman brings together various aspects of court culture in the Macedonian empires of the post-Achaemenid Near East. ; Acknowledgments; List of Illustrations; Abbreviations; Introduction: Court and empire in the Hellenistic Near East; PART I: SETTING THE STAGE; 1. The court as an instrument of power; 2. The theater of royalty; 3. The royal palace: A stage for royal rituals; PART II: THE COURT AS A SOCIO-POLITICAL SYSTEM; 4. The royal household; 5. Court society; 6. Royal pages; 7. Social dynamics; 8. Hierarchy and conflict; PART III: CEREMONIAL AND RITUAL; 9. Ceremonial and protocol; 10. Death and resurrection: Inauguration ritual; 11. The royal entry; 12. Royal processions: Enacting the myth of empire; Conclusion; Bibliography; The Macedonian dynasties.

    • History of other lands
      March 2017

      ReOrienting the Sasanians

      East Iran in Late Antiquity

      by Khodadad Rezakhani

      Central Asia is commonly imagined as the marginal land on the periphery of Chinese and Middle Eastern civilisations. At best, it is understood as a series of disconnected areas that served as stop-overs along the Silk Road. However, in the mediaeval period, this region rose to prominence and importance as one of the centres of Persian-Islamic culture, from the Seljuks to the Mongols and Timur. Khodadad Rezakhani tells the back story of this rise to prominence, the story of the famed Kushans and mysterious ‘Asian Huns’, and their role in shaping both the Sasanian Empire and the rest of the Middle East. Contextualises Persian history in relation to the history of Central Asia Extends the concept of late antiquity further east than is usually done Surveys the history of Iran and Central Asia between 200 and 800 CE and contextualises the rise of Islam in both regions ; In the mediaeval period, Central Asia rose to prominence as a centre of Persian-Islamic culture, from the Seljuks to the Mongols. Khodadad Rezakhani tells the back story of this rise to prominence, the story of the famed Kushans and mysterious ‘Asian Huns’, and their role in shaping both the Sasanian Empire and the rest of the Middle East. ; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Series Editor's Preface; Maps; Preface; Introduction; Chapter I: Sasanians and the Sistanis; Chapter 2. Kushans and the Sasanians; Chapter 3. Kushano-Sasanians in East Iran; Chapter 4. The Iranian Huns and the Kidarites; Chapter 5. The Alkhans in the Southern Hindu Kush; Chapter 6. The Hepthalite 'Empire' and its Successors; Chapter 7. Sogdiana in the Kidardite and Hepthalite Periods; Chapter 8. The Ne¯zak and Turk Periods; Chapter 9. Tokharestan and Sogdiana in the Late Sasanian Period; General Conclusions and Postscript; Epilogue and Excursus on the Shahnameh; Bibliography; Index.

    • History of other lands
      June 2017

      Sasanian Persia

      Between Rome and the Steppes of Eurasia

      by Eberhard W. Sauer

      The Sasanian Empire (third-seventh centuries) was one of the largest empires of antiquity, stretching from Mesopotamia to modern Pakistan and from Central Asia to the Arabian Peninsula. This mega-empire withstood powerful opponents in the steppe and expanded further in Late Antiquity, whilst the Roman world shrunk in size. Recent research has revealed the reasons for this success, notably population growth in some key territories, economic prosperity and urban development, made possible through investment in agriculture and military infrastructure on a scale unparalleled in the late antique world. Our volume explores the empire’s relations with its neighbours and key phenomena which contributed to its wealth and power, from the empire’s armed forces to agriculture, trade and treatment of minorities. The latest discoveries, notably major urban foundations, fortifications and irrigations systems, feature prominently. An empire whose military might and urban culture rivalled Rome and foreshadowed the caliphate will be of interest to scholars of the Roman and Islamic world. ; The Sasanian Empire was one of the largest empires of antiquity, stretching from Mesopotamia to modern Pakistan. This book explores key phenomena which contributed to its wealth and power, from the empire’s armed forces to agriculture, trade and treatment of minorities. The latest discoveries feature prominently. ; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Notes on Contributors; Series Editor’s Foreword; Introduction, Eberhard W. Sauer; Sasanian cities: archaeological perspectives on the urban economy and built environment of an empire, St John Simpson; Palaeoecological insights into agri-horti-cultural and pastoral practices before, during and after the Sasanian Empire, Lyudmila Shumilovskikh, Morteza Djamali, Valérie Andrieu-Ponel, Philippe Ponel, Jacques-Louis de Beaulieu, Abdolmajid Naderi-Beni and Eberhard W. Sauer; Animal exploitation and subsistence on the borders of the Sasanian Empire: from the Gorgan Wall (Iran) to the Gates of the Alans (Georgia); Marjan Mashkour, Roya Khazaeli, Homa Fathi, Sarieh Amiri, Delphine Decruyenaere, Azadeh Mohaseb, Hossein Davoudi, Shiva Sheikhi and Eberhard W. Sauer; The Northern and Western Borderlands of the Sasanian Empire: Contextualizing the Roman/Byzantine and Sasanian Frontier, Dan Lawrence and Tony J. Wilkinson; Connectivity on a Sasanian frontier: Route systems in the Gorgan Plain of north-east Iran, Kristen Hopper; The Sasanian Empire and the East: A summary of the evidence and its implications for Rome, Warwick Ball; Minority Religions in the Sasanian Empire: Suppression, Integration, and Relations with Rome, Lee E. Patterson; A Contested Jurisdiction: Armenia in Late Antiquity, Tim Greenwood; Cultural contacts between Rome and Persia at the time of Ardashir I (AD 224-240), Pierfrancesco Callieri; Innovation and Stagnation: Military Infrastructure and the Shifting Balance of Power between Rome and Persia, Eberhard W. Sauer, Jebrael Nokandeh, Konstantin Pitskhelauri and Hamid Omrani Rekavandi; The Arabian Frontier: A Keystone of the Sasanian Empire, Craig Morley; The India Trade in Late Antiquity, James Howard-Johnston. ; Preliminaries: List of Illustrations, Acknowledgements, Notes on the Contributors, Series Editor’s Foreword1. Introduction Eberhard W. Sauer 2. Sasanian cities: archaeological perspectives on the urban economy and built environment of an empire St John Simpson 3. Palaeoecological insights into agri-horti-cultural and pastoral practices before, during and after the Sasanian Empire Lyudmila Shumilovskikh, Morteza Djamali, Valérie Andrieu-Ponel, Philippe Ponel, Jacques-Louis de Beaulieu, Abdolmajid Naderi-Beni and Eberhard W. Saue4. Animal exploitation and subsistence on the borders of the Sasanian Empire: from the Gorgan Wall (Iran) to the Gates of the Alans (Georgia) Marjan Mashkour, Roya Khazaeli, Homa Fathi, Sarieh Amiri, Delphine Decruyenaere, Azadeh Mohaseb, Hossein Davoudi, Shiva Sheikhi and Eberhard W. Sauer5. The Northern and Western Borderlands of the Sasanian Empire: Contextualizing the Roman/Byzantine and Sasanian Frontier Dan Lawrence and Tony J. Wilkinson 6. Connectivity on a Sasanian frontier: Route systems in the Gorgan Plain of north-east Iran Kristen Hopper 7. The Sasanian Empire and the East: A summary of the evidence and its implications for Rome Warwick Ball 8. Minority Religions in the Sasanian Empire: Suppression, Integration, and Relations with Rome Lee E. Patterson 9. A Contested Jurisdiction: Armenia in Late Antiquity Tim Greenwood 10. Cultural contacts between Rome and Persia at the time of Ardashir I (AD 224-240) Pierfrancesco Callieri 11. Innovation and Stagnation: Military Infrastructure and the Shifting Balance of Power between Rome and Persia Eberhard W. Sauer, Jebrael Nokandeh, Konstantin Pitskhelauri and Hamid Omrani Rekavandi12. The Arabian Frontier: A Keystone of the Sasanian Empire Craig Morley13. The India Trade in Late Antiquity James Howard-Johnston

    • History of the Americas
      February 2017

      American Imperialism

      The Territorial Expansion of the United States, 1783-2013

      by Adam Burns

      Provides a critical re-evaluation of US territorial expansionism and imperialism from 1783 to the present The United States has been described by many of its foreign and domestic critics as an “empire”. Providing a wide-ranging analysis of the United States as a territorial, imperial power from its foundation to the present day, this book explores the United States’ acquisition or long-term occupation of territories through a chronological perspective. It begins by exploring early continental expansion, such as the purchase of the Louisiana Territory from Napoleon Bonaparte in 1803, and traces US imperialism through to the controversial ongoing presence of US forces at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. The book provides fresh insights into the history of US territorial expansion and imperialism, bringing together more well-known instances (such as the purchase of Alaska) with those less-frequently discussed (such as the acquisition of the Guano Islands after 1856). The volume considers key historical debates, controversies and turning points, providing a historiographically-grounded re-evaluation of US expansion from 1783 to the present day. Key Features Provides case studies of different examples of US territorial expansion/imperialism, and adds much-needed context to ongoing debates over US imperialism for students of both History and Politics Analyses many of the better known instances of US imperialism (for example, Cuba and the Philippines), while also considering often-overlooked examples such as the US Virgin Islands, American Samoa and Guam Explores American imperialism from a “territorial acquisition/long-term occupation” viewpoint which differentiates it from many other books that instead focus on informal and economic imperialism Discusses the presence of the US in key places such as Guantanamo Bay, the Panama Canal Zone and the Arctic ; Providing a wide-ranging analysis of the United States as a territorial, imperial power from its foundation to the present day, this book explores the United States’ acquisition or long-term occupation of territories through a chronological perspective. ; Introduction: Defining an Empire; 1. Atlantic to Pacific (1783–1893); 2. Heading Northwards (1812-1903); 3. Leaving the Continent (1817-1890); 4. A Two Ocean Empire (1890–1898); 5. Spanish Plunder (1898–1917); 6. An Empire Among Equals (1899–1917); 7. Occupation Over Annexation (1912-1973); 8. Continuing Imperialism (1940-2013); Conclusion; Bibliography.

    • History of the Americas
      January 2018

      Black Nationalism in American History

      From the Nineteenth Century to the Million Man March

      by Mark Newman

      Provides a concise up-to-date introduction to and overview of black nationalism in American history This analytical introduction assesses contrasting definitions of black nationalism in America, thereby providing an overview of its development and varied manifestations across two centuries. Its aim is to evaluate historiographical debates and synthesize a broad range of scholarship, much of it published since the beginning of the new millennium. However, unlike some of that work, this book offers a critical perspective that avoids advocacy or condemnation of black nationalism by examining major black nationalist thinkers, leaders and organizations as well as discussing some lesser-known groups and figures, the nature of black nationalism’s appeal and the position of women in and their contributions to black nationalism. Key Features Considers divergent definitions of black nationalism, providing an understanding of the nature of black nationalism Outlines historiography with an up-to-date assessment of key debates and leading scholarship Considers continuity, encouraging discussion of whether black nationalism was essentially unchanging or reflective of particular historical circumstances Looks beyond leading figures to understand how, why and when black nationalism gained support ; This analytical introduction assesses contrasting definitions of black nationalism in America, thereby providing an overview of its development and varied manifestations across two centuries. ; Chronology; 1. Black Nationalism before Marcus Garvey; 2. Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association; 3. The Nation of Islam and Malcolm X; 4. Black Nationalism, 1966-1970; 5. Black Nationalism, 1971-1995; Conclusion.

    • History of other lands
      June 2016

      Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus

      by Lisa Irene Hau

      Why did human beings first begin to write history? Lisa Irene Hau argues that a driving force among Greek historians was the desire to use the past to teach lessons about the present and for the future. She uncovers the moral messages of the ancient Greek writers of history and the techniques they used to bring them across. Hau also shows how moral didacticism was an integral part of the writing of history from its inception in the 5th century BC, how it developed over the next 500 years in parallel with the development of historiography as a genre and how the moral messages on display remained surprisingly stable across this period. For the ancient Greek historiographers, moral didacticism was a way of making sense of the past and making it relevant to the present; but this does not mean that they falsified events: truth and morality were compatible and synergistic ends. ; Lisa Irene Hau argues that a driving force among Greek historians was the desire to use the past to teach lessons about the present and for the future. She uncovers the moral messages of the ancient Greek writers of history and the techniques they used to bring them across. ; Preface; Introduction; Part I. Hellenistic Historiography; Chapter 1. Polybius; Chapter 2. Diodorus Siculus; Chapter 3. Fragmentary Hellenistic Historiography; Introduction; Timaeus of Tauromenium (FGrH 566) ; Duris of Samos (FGrH 76); Phylarchus (FGrH 81); Agatharchides of Cnidus (FGrH 86); Posidonius of Apamea (FGrH 87); Hieronymus of Cardia (FGrH 154); Conclusion; Part II. Classical Historiography; Introduction; Chapter 4. Herodotus; Chapter 5. Thucydides; Chapter 6. Xenophon Hellenica; Chapter 7. Fragments of Classical Historiographers; The Oxyrhynchus Historian; Ephorus of Cyme (FGrH 70); Theopompus of Chios (FGrH 115) Conclusion: from macro and minimalist moralising to explicit paradeigmata; Conclusion; Bibliography; Text editions; Scholarly literature.

    • History of other lands
      December 2016

      Semiramis' Legacy

      The History of Persia According to Diodorus of Sicily

      by Jan P. Stronk

      There are only a few detailed histories of Persia from Ancient Greek historiography that have survived time. Diodorus of Sicily, a first century BC author, is the only one to have written a comprehensive history (the Βιβλιοθήκη ἱστορική (Bibliotheca Historica or Historical Library)) in which more than cursory attention is paid to Persia. The Bibliotheca Historica covers the entire period from Persia’s prehistory until the arrival of the Parthians from the East and that of Roman power throughout Asia Minor and beyond from the West, some 750 odd years or more after Assyrian rule ended. Diodorus’ contribution to our knowledge of Persian history is therefore of great value for the modern historian of the Ancient Near East and in this book Jan Stronk provides the first complete translation of Diodorus’ account of the history of Persia. He also examines and evaluates both Diodorus’ account and the sources he used to compose his work, taking into consideration the historical, political and archaeological factors that may have played a role in the transmission of the evidence he used to acquire the raw material underlying his Bibliotheca. ; There are only a few detailed histories of Persia from Ancient Greek historiography that have survived time. Diodorus of Sicily, a first century BC author, is the only one to have written a comprehensive history in which more than cursory attention is paid to Persia. ; List of figures and Tables; Preface; Abbreviations; Series Editor's Preface; Introduction: Diodorus’ Work and Our Sources; Chapter one: Diodorus’ Sources; Chapter two: Ancient History: Assyrians, Chaldeans and Medes; Chapter three: The Persians and the Greek Wars; Chapter four: Revolt and Sedition; Chapter five: Alexander the Great Defeats Darius III; Chapter six: From Persepolis to Babylon; Chapter seven: The Period of the Diadochs: The Rift Opens; Chapter eight: The Period of the Diadochs: The Rift Deepens; Chapter nine: The Vicissitudes of the Diadoch Kingdoms: The Final Years of Diodorus’ Persian Account; Chapter ten: Semiramis’ Legacy; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index of Classical sources; Index of Modern Authors; General index. ; List of Figures and TablesPrefaceAbbreviationsSeries Editor’s PrefaceIntroduction: Diodorus’ Work and Our SourcesA. IntroductionB. Diodorus’ lifeC. The Bιβλιοθήκη ἱστορική (‘Historical Library’)D. Diodorus’ methodE. Diodorus’ viewsF. The structure of the BibliothecaG. Final observationsH. SummaryI. Our primary sources for Diodorus: manuscripts and relevant editionsManuscripts of books 1-5Manuscripts of books 11-20The Excerpta ConstantinianaManuscripts of the Excerpta ConstantinianaPhotius’ BibliothecaManuscripts of Photius’ BibliothecaSome editions of Diodorus’ Bibliotheca1 Diodorus’ SourcesA. Preliminary remarksB. Books 1-5C. Fragments books 6-10D. Books 11-20E. Fragments books 21-32F. Fragments books 33-40G. Diodorus and his source-authorsH. Diodorus’ use of his sources2 Ancient History: Assyrians, Chaldeans, and MedesA. The Assyrian HistoryB. The Chaldean HistoryC. The Median History3 The Persians and the Greek WarsA. The Arians and general customs of the PersiansB. Cyrus the Great (c. 576/5-530)C. Cambyses II (?–523/2)D. Darius the Great (c. 550-486)E. Xerxes I (c. 519-465)4 Revolt and SeditionA. Artaxerxes I (?–424)B. Xerxes II (?–423)C. Sogdianus (?–423)D. Darius II (?–404)E. Artaxerxes II Mnemon (c. 436-358)F. Artaxerxes III Ochus (425-338)5 Alexander the Great Defeats Darius IIIA. Darius III Codomannus (c. 380-330)B. Alexander’s expedition up to the end of the Battle of IssusC. From Issus to GaugamelaD. From Gaugamela to Persepolis6 From Persepolis to BabylonA. Alexander pursues BessusB. Alexander’s Indian adventureC. The final phase of the expedition7 The Period of the Diadochs: The Rift OpensThe years 323/2-318/178 The Period of the Diadochs: The Rift DeepensThe years 317/16-311/109 The Vicissitudes of the Diadoch Kingdoms: The Final Years of Diodorus’ Persian AccountA. The years 311/10-260/79B. The years after 28010 Semiramis’ LegacyConclusionBibliographyIndex of Classical SourcesIndex of Modern AuthorsGeneral Index

    • Asian history
      May 2017

      Asia after Versailles

      Asian Perspectives on the Paris Peace Conference and the Interwar Order, 1919-33

      by Urs Matthias Zachmann

      Asia After Versailles addresses an important but neglected watershed for Asian nations - the response to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. The Conference marked the end of a conflict which, although intrinsically European, had globalized the world on many levels, politically as well as economically, culturally and socially. It also stood at the beginning of a new order that saw the power centre shift towards the US and Asia. Asian countries and people played a significant but so far largely neglected role in this momentous development. Bringing together an international range of experts in the history of China, Japan, India and the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, this pioneering volume demonstrates the importance of Asia in the multifaceted global transformations that revolved around the Paris Peace Conference and its aftermath. Traditional historical analysis focuses almost exclusively on US and European responses to the Paris Peace Conference and the interwar order and often fails to take into account non-western, particularly Asian voices – this is the first book to demonstrate the far-reaching Asian dimensions of the impact of Versailles in an unprecedented way making this an invaluable and interdisciplinary resource for academics and researchers in the fields of politics, international relations, area studies and history. ; Asia After Versailles addresses an important watershed for Asian nations - the response to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. It marked the end of a conflict which, although intrinsically European, had globalized the world on many levels and stood at the beginning of a new order that saw the power centre shift towards the US and Asia. ; Introduction: Asia After Versailles Urs Matthias ZachmannPart I1. The Correlation of Crises, 1918–1920 Mark Metzler2. Muslim Asia after Versailles Cemil Aydin3. From Versailles to Shanghai: Pan-Asianist Legacies of the Paris Peace Conference and the Failure of Asianism from Below Torsten WeberPart II4. A Cultural History of Diplomacy: Re-assessing the Japanese ‘Performance’ at the Paris Peace Conference Naoko Shimazu5. India’s Freedom and the League of Nations: Public Debates 1919-33 Maria Framke6. Dashed Hopes: Japanese Buddhist Perspectives on the Paris Peace Conference John LoBreglio7. Particularism and Universalism in the New Nationalism of Post-Versailles Japan Kevin Doak8. Versailles and the Fate of Chinese Internationalism: Re-Assessing the Anarchist Case Gotelind Müller9. The Impact of Versailles on Chinese Nationalism as Reflected in Shanghai Graphic and Urban Culture, 1919-1931 Hiroko Sakamoto

    • European history
      December 2016

      Northern Neighbours

      Scotland and Norway since 1800

      by John Bryden, Ottar Brox, Lesley Riddoch

      BCC approved (with endorsements) "How is it that two broadly similar countries, neighbours with roughly equal populations and similar natural conditions, can follow two very different development paths? The authors of Northern Neighbours claim that ‘politics matter’. In their comparative history of Scotland and Norway, key factors in each county’s development are thrown into relief. The result is a convincing explanation for their divergence and a significant contribution to development theory in general." Matthew Hoffman, Cornell University "In this important book we can read another exciting attempt to examine through the comparative lens the modern histories of Norway and Scotland. A team of interdisciplinary experts drawn from both countries and elsewhere in the UK have been assembled to consider the radically different historical paths of two small nations and the social, political and economic consequences." Professor Sir Tom M. Devine A topical, comparative study of the economic, social and political development of Norway and Scotland Northern Neighbours explores the reasons for, and outcomes of, the social, political and economic divergence between Scotland and Norway over a period encompassing 500 years, in an engaging and comprehensive way. This accessible comparative study takes a closer look at the links between suffrage, property ownership and the process of democratisation and distribution of political power, land use and reform, the relative movement of populations, the process of industrialization, and rights of access. It offers a thorough analysis of the history of religion, education and finance in both countries, and explores the exploitation of their rich natural resources, and the resulting contrast in their fortunes. The authors also pose timely questions about the future of both countries; whether the economic and social disparities between the two can be addressed, and if the Nordic model could provide a basis for a realistic and effective development strategy for Scotland, were it to become an independent nation. John Bryden is Emeritus Professor of Human Geography at the University of Aberdeen Ottar Brox is former research director of the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research Lesley Riddoch is a freelance journalist, commentator and broadcaster ; This edited collection of essays covers various elements of the analysis of Norway and Scotland including land ownership, politics, agriculture, industry, money and banking, local government, education, religion, access and the outdoor life, as well as several more synthetic chapters. ; Acknowledgements; Preface by Tom Devine; 1. Introduction, John Bryden, Erik Opsahl, Ottar Brox & Lesley Riddoch; 2. Towards a Theory of Divergent Development, John Bryden; 3. Cousins Divided? Development in and of political institutions in Scotland and Norway since 1814, Øivind Bratberg & Nik. Brandal; 4. Agrarian Change in Scotland and Norway: Agricultural Production, Structures, Politics and Policies since 1800, John Bryden & Agnar Hegrenes; 5. The Evolution of Local Government and Governance in Scotland and Norway, Eberhart Bort, John Bryden & Karen Refsgaard; 6. Industrial Development and North Sea Oil: Contrasts from Norway and Scotland, John Bryden & Ottar Brox; 7. Reflections on the Making of Norway, Ottar Brox; 8. Money and Banking in Scotland and Norway, John Bryden & John Keith Hart; 9. Religion in Scotland and Norway, Arne Bugge Amundsen & Michael Rosie; 10. The Nordic Welfare Model in Norway and Scotland, Mary Hilson & Andrew Newby; 11. Access, Nature, Culture and the Great Outdoors – Norway and Scotland, Lesley Riddoch; 12. Education in Norway and Scotland: Developing and re-forming the systems by Bronwen Cohen & Wenche Rønning; 13. The Differential Impacts of the Two World Wars in Norway and Scotland, Tore Petersen; 14. Conclusions, Lesley Riddoch, Ottar Brox & John Bryden; Index. ; AcknowledgementsPreface by Tom Devine1. Introduction, John Bryden, Erik Opsahl, Ottar Brox & Lesley Riddoch2. Towards a Theory of Divergent Development, John Bryden3. Cousins Divided? Development in and of political institutions in Scotland and Norway since 1814, Øivind Bratberg & Nik. Brandal4. Agrarian Change in Scotland and Norway: Agricultural Production, Structures, Politics and Policies since 1800, John Bryden & Agnar Hegrenes5. The Evolution of Local Government and Governance in Scotland and Norway, Eberhart Bort, John Bryden & Karen Refsgaard6. Industrial Development and North Sea Oil: Contrasts from Norway and Scotland, John Bryden & Ottar Brox7. Reflections on the Making of Norway, Ottar Brox8. Money and Banking in Scotland and Norway, John Bryden & John Keith Hart9. Religion in Scotland and Norway, Arne Bugge Amundsen & Michael Rosie10. The Nordic Welfare Model in Norway and Scotland, Mary Hilson & Andrew Newby11. Access, Nature, Culture and the Great Outdoors – Norway and Scotland, Lesley Riddoch12. Education in Norway and Scotland: Developing and re-forming the systems by Bronwen Cohen & Wenche Rønning13. The Differential Impacts of the Two World Wars in Norway and Scotland, Tore Petersen14. Conclusions, Lesley Riddoch, Ottar Brox & John BrydenIndex

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2018

      Das Dritte Reich

      Diktatur, Volksgemeinschaft, Krieg

      by Jörg Echternkamp

      Die Reihe Oldenbourg Grundriss der Geschichte dient seit 1978 als wichtiges Mittel der Orientierung, sowohl für Studierende wie für Lehrende. Sie löst seither ein, was ihr Titel verspricht: ein Grundriss zu sein, also einen Plan zur Verfügung zu stellen, der aus der Vogelschau Einsichten gewährt, die aus anderen Perspektiven schwerlich zu gewinnen wären. Seit ihren Anfängen ist die Reihe bei ihren wesentlichen Anliegen geblieben. In einer bewährten Dreiteilung wollen ihre Bände in einem ersten Teil einen Überblick über den jeweiligen historischen Gegenstand geben. Ein zweiter Teil wird bestimmt durch einen ausgiebigen Forschungsüberblick, der nicht nur den Studierenden in einem historischen Forschungsgebiet eine Übersicht über gegenwärtige wie vergangene thematische Schwerpunkte und vor allem Debatten gibt. Denn angesichts der Komplexität, Internationalität sowie der zeitlichen Tiefe, die für solche Diskussionen kennzeichnend sind, stellt es auch für Wissenschaftler eine zunehmende Herausforderung dar, über die wesentlichen Bereiche einer Forschungsdebatte informiert zu bleiben. Hier leistet die Reihe eine wesentliche Hilfestellung – und hier lässt sich auch das Merkmal identifizieren, das sie von anderen Publikationsvorhaben dieser Art deutlich abhebt. Eine umfangreiche Bibliographie rundet als dritter Teil die jeweiligen Bände ab. Im Laufe ihrer eigenen Historie hat der Oldenbourg Grundriss der Geschichte auf die Veränderungen in geschichtswissenschaftlichen Diskussionen und im Geschichtsstudium reagiert. Sie hat sich nach und nach neue Themenfelder erschlossen. Es geht der Reihe in ihrer Gesamtheit nicht mehr ausschließlich darum, in der griechisch-römischen Antike zu beginnen, um das europäische Mittelalter zu durchschreiten und schließlich in der Neuzeit als unserer erweiterten Gegenwart anzukommen. Dieser Gang durch die Chronologie der deutschen und europäischen Geschichte ist für die Orientierung im historischen Geschehen weiterhin grundlegend; er wird aber zunehmend erweitert durch Bände zu nicht europäischen Themen und zu thematischen Schwerpunkten. Die Reihe dokumentiert damit die inhaltlichen Veränderungen, die sich in den Geschichtswissenschaften international beständig vollziehen. Mit diesen Inhalten wendet sich die Reihee einerseits an Studierende, die sich die Komplexität eines Themenfeldes nicht nur inhaltlich, sondern auch forschungsgeschichtlich erschließen wollen. Andererseits sollen Lehrende in ihrem Anliegen unterstützt werden, Themengebiete in Vorlesungen und Seminaren vermitteln zu können. Im Mittelpunkt steht aber immer der Versuch zu zeigen, wie Geschichte in ihren Ereignissen und Strukturen durch Wissenschaft gemacht wird und damit selbst historisch gewachsen ist. Karl-Joachim Hölkeskamp Achim Landwehr Steffen Patzold Benedikt Stuchtey

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Fremde in der hellenistischen Polis Rhodos

      Zwischen Nähe und Distanz

      by Benedikt Boyxen

      Migration und Mobilität können als prägende Merkmale der Epoche des Hellenismus bezeichnet werden. Die Forschung zur hellenistischen Polis hat sich in jüngerer Zeit besonders diesen Phänomenen gewidmet und den Blick auf die Formen der Vernetzungen verschiedener Poleis gerichtet. Demgegenüber wurde bislang nicht systematisch untersucht, welche sozialen Auswirkungen diese neuen Rahmenbedingungen auf die Bürgerschaft einer Polis hatten und wie sich das räumliche Neben- oder Miteinander von Bürgern und Nichtbürgern gestaltete. Rhodos bietet in dieser Hinsicht ein besonders instruktives Fallbeispiel. Begünstigt durch die Lage an den zentralen Handelsrouten gelang der Polis in dieser Zeit der Aufstieg zu einer bedeutenden See- und Handelsmacht und war gerade deshalb für zahlreiche Fremde attraktiv. Der günstige, vornehmlich epigraphische Quellenbefund erlaubt es, die soziale Stellung der Fremden hier genauer zu betrachten. Ausgehend von dem rechtlichen Status der Nichtbürger ist es das Ziel dieser Studie, verschiedene Gruppen von Nichtbürgern zu unterscheiden, die Formen der Interaktion der Fremden mit den Polisbürgern in den Blick zu nehmen und nach Möglichkeiten sozialer Mobilität zu fragen. Dabei werden detailliert die zentralen Lebensbereiche der Polisbewohner betrachtet, um konkrete Inklusions- und Exklusionsbereiche auszumachen.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Antoninus Pius und die Rollenbilder des römischen Princeps

      Herrscherliches Handeln und seine Repräsentation in der Hohen Kaiserzeit

      by Christoph Michels

      Der Princeps Antoninus Pius (138-161) hat in der jüngeren Forschung nur wenig Beachtung gefunden. Das ist zum einen Folge der fragmentarischen Überlieferung und zum anderen des daraus resultierenden Bildes seiner Herrschaft als einer Phase des Stillstands. Diese Untersuchung löst sich von der stark personalisierenden Perspektive der literarischen Quellen, welche die ältere Forschung noch maßgeblich beeinflusste, und betrachtet Pius’ Herrschaft auf strukturgeschichtlicher Ebene unter Einbeziehung und kritischer Reflexion herrschaftssoziologischer Modelle zum römischen Prinzipat. Die Studie entwirft so zum ersten Mal ein kontextualisiertes Bild der Politik und Repräsentation des Antoninus Pius. Ausgehend von der problematischen Anfangsphase seiner Herrschaft werden sein Agieren in Rom und Italia zwischen Hof, Senat, Ritterschaft und plebs urbana, die dynastische Inszenierung der domus Augusta sowie die Rolle des Antoninus Pius – mitnichten ein „Friedenskaiser" – als oberster Feldherr analysiert. Die Rekonstruktion der Gestalt, die Pius seiner Herrschaft gab, erschließt einen vermeintlich bekannten Herrscher neu und leistet als Fallstudie einen Beitrag zum Gesamtbild von Handlungsspielraum und Repräsentation der römischen Principes.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Why China did not have a Renaissance – and why that matters

      An interdisciplinary Dialogue

      by Thomas Maissen, Barbara Mittler

      Concepts of historical progress or decline and the idea of a cycle of historical movement have existed in many civilizations. In spite of claims that they be transnational or even universal, periodization schemes invariably reveal specific social and cultural predispositions.Our dialogue, which brings together a Sinologist and a scholar of early modern History in Europe, considers periodization as a historical phenomenon, studying the case of the “Renaissance.” Understood in the tradition of J. Burckhardt, who referred back to ideas voiced by the humanists of the 14th and 15th centuries, and focusing on the particularities of humanist dialogue which informed the making of the “Renaissance” in Italy, our discussion highlights elements that distinguish it from other movements that have proclaimed themselves as “r/Renaissances,” studying, in particular, the Chinese Renaissance in the early 20th century.While disagreeing on several fundamental issues, we suggest that interdisciplinary and interregional dialogue is a format useful to addressing some of the more far-reaching questions in global history, e.g. whether and when a periodization scheme such as “Renaissance” can fruitfully be applied to describe non-European experiences.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2018

      Hitler – New Research

      by Elizabeth Harvey, Johannes Hürter

      How should we understand Hitler as a factor in the history of the Third Reich? In recent years scholarly interest in the German dictator has once again intensified, as is evident from debates surrounding the publication of Mein Kampf, and from the publication of numerous new studies on Hitler’s personality, ideology and politics. Edited by Elizabeth Harvey (University of Nottingham) and Johannes Hürter (Institute for Contemporary History Munich – Berlin), the third volume of the German Yearbook of Contemporary History presents the latest in German research on Hitler based on selected articles from the Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte. Additionally, it includes new commentaries by renowned experts from the English-speaking world on theories concerning Hitler’s personality and authenticity, the sources of his radical racism, and the relationship between the dictator and German society.

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