• Islam
      October 2016

      Muslims and the Making of America

      by Amir Hussain

      "There has never been an America without Muslims"—so begins Amir Hussain, one of the most important scholars and teachers of Islam in America. Hussain, who is himself an American Muslim, contends that Muslims played an essential role in the creation and cultivation of the United States. Memories of 9/11 and the rise of global terrorism fuel concerns about American Muslims. The fear of American Muslims in part stems from the stereotype that all followers of Islam are violent extremists who want to overturn the American way of life. Inherent to this stereotype is the popular misconception that Islam is a new religion to America. In Muslims and the Making of America Hussain directly addresses both of these stereotypes. Far from undermining America, Islam and American Muslims have been, and continue to be, important threads in the fabric of American life. Hussain chronicles the history of Islam in America to underscore the valuable cultural influence of Muslims on American life. He then rivets attention on music, sports, and culture as key areas in which Muslims have shaped and transformed American identity. America, Hussain concludes, would not exist as it does today without the essential contributions made by its Muslim citizens. ; Introduction: The American Ideal and Islam1. Islam in America: A Short History2. Blues for Allah: Music3. The Greatest: Sports4. American Mosques: CultureConclusion: The Poetry of Ordinary American Muslim Lives

    • History
      November 2015

      Jimmy Hoffa Called My Mom A Bitch: Profiles in Stupidity

      by Jason H. Vines

      The book is broken up into various chapters of stupidity: Stupid Democrats, Stupid Republicans, Stupid Atheists, Stupid Christians, Stupid Criminals, Stupid Policies, Stupid People and so on. The “Stupid Criminals” chapter contains one of my favorite columns that appeared on the Detroit News’ political website. The June 29, 2010 column is titled “Globe Al Warming Gets Rubbed the Wrong Way,” and it takes on allegations that the former VP got inappropriately horny with female masseuse at a Portland, Oregon hotel. That column also continues the sick, yet hilarious saga of Otis “Masturgate” Mathis, the illiterate (no kidding), former head of Detroit Public Schools who was forced out after he admittedly fondled himself in front of numerous female superintendents. No, I am not making this up. I coined the scandal “Masturgate” and it soon became the rage in Detroit media and made my column one of the most popular on the site.

    • Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • History of the Americas
      October 2015

      America: From White Settlement to World Hegemony

      by Victor Kiernan

      While there have been many analyses of American imperialism, both before and since, few have equalled the breadth or insight of this seminal text, one of the first to provide a historical perspective on the origins of the American empire. Victor Kiernan, one of the world's most respected historians, employs a nuanced knowledge of history, literature, and politics in tracing the evolution of American power. Far reaching and ambitious in its scope, the book combines accounts of the changing relationship between Native Americans and the white population with readings of the works of key cultural figures such as Melville and Whitman, as well as an analysis of the way in which money and politics became so closely intertwined in American democracy. The result is a compelling account of how the country came to be the global hegemon that it is today. Also included is a preface by Eric Hobsbawm providing insight into his own views on American imperialism as well as a valuable introduction to Victor Kiernan's work. Together, they shed useful light on such issues as the uses and misuses of American military might, its lack of respect for international agreements, and the right to pre-emptive defence; Issues which remain just as urgent today.

    • History of medicine
      May 2017

      Leprosy and colonialism

      Suriname under Dutch rule, 1750–1950

      by Stephen Snelders. Series edited by Professor Keir Waddington

      Leprosy and colonialism investigates the history of leprosy in Suriname within the context of Dutch colonial power and racial conflict, from the plantation economy and the age of slavery to its legacy in the modern colonial state. It explores the relationship between the modern stigmatization and exclusion of people affected with leprosy, and the political tensions and racial fears originating in colonial slave society, exerting their influence until after the decolonization up to the present day. In the book colonial sources are read from shifting perspectives, of the colonial rulers and, 'from below', the ruled. Though leprosy is today a neglected tropical disease, recognizing influences of our colonial heritage in our global management of health and disease, and exploring the perspectives of other cultures are essential in a time in which migration movements make the permeability of boundaries, and transmission of diseases, more common then perhaps ever before.

    • Geopolitics
      April 2015

      1812 in the Americas

      by Editor(s): Jean-Marc Serme

      This book brings together a variety of interesting perspectives on the circumstances and effects of the war in 1812, offering a range of insights, from an exploration of the role religion played in the conflict to an investigation of low literature of the time reacted to it.The book is opened by a contribution from Adam Rothman, who examines the concept of the paracolonial republic to highlight that the US in 1812 was surrounded by monarchical colonial powers and used imperial means against its indigenous populations.In the second essay, Tangi Villerbu explores the way in which the Catholic Church set out to organize the space for its own development west of the Appalachian Mountains in the context of a continental war.Following this, John Dickinson explores the heart of the early hours of the conflict in his account of the northern borderland and the new sense of itself Canada gained after successfully defending its territory against US invasion. Using biography as an efficient type of narrative to account for the complex situations of Native American groups during the war, Sheri Shuck-Hall focuses on the fascinating character of William Weatherford,who joined the traditionalists despite his strong cultural and economic interests among the Muscogee/Creek metis class. This volume also contains an essay by Nelly André on revolutionary women in South America. She points out that too much emphasis on a military-political definition of history has pushed women into the corners of national narratives. Her essay presents a few of these remarkable, sometimes forgotten, heroes. American literature had not yet fully emerged in its own right in 1812. As Ed White demonstrates in his essay, novel production at the time was scant and failed to provide satisfactory accounts of the war. Instead, as the author argues, only poetry was able to keep pace with the flow of events and create national representations.In his essay, Marco Sioli considers the events of the period in their cultural dimensions. He looks at the ways in which the press shaped the perceptions of the war and helped devise a more affirmed national identity despite the poor record of American military deeds. The volume closes with inisghts into another genre that had a major impact on the discussions about going to war against the British Empire: the sermon. Lucia Bergamasco’s careful and close reading of such texts provides the reader with the arguments that shook the nation, such as sectional antagonism, slavery, and political and moral reformation.

    • Literary studies: general
      July 2007

      Florida Studies

      Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association

      by Editor(s): Claudia Slate, General Editor, Florida Southern College and Steve Glassman, Executive

      Florida was the first region of the United States to be discovered, explored, and, after a fashion, settled by Euroamericans. Its population in the early 21st century is approaching 17 million. Within years the number of people living in the state will surpass those living in New York, and the Sunshine State will become the most populous area east of the Mississippi. The first book in English about Florida was written by Jean Ribault. A French adventurer, Ribault established a colony of Huguenots near present-day Jacksonville. He was captured by the very able Spanish commander Pedro Menendez, who ordered his French rival and all his minions killed.The state’s long and colorful past is matched by its equally long and colorful literary production. Strangely, critical assessment of Florida literature has lagged far behind. With this volume, the Florida College English Association has formally begun an effort to correct this lamentable oversight. Included are papers on every aspect of Florida literature and history by scholars from every part of the state who are employed in every kind of institution of higher learning. Of special interest are the studies of Florida literature in the 19th century and in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, areas that are generally ignored in national journals. The papers on the contributions of African-American literary figures, such as Zora Hurston and James Weldon Johnson, are noteworthy. Of particular interest are the suggestions for teaching Florida studies in the classroom, which can be adapted for high school as well as college students.

    • Migration, immigration & emigration
      January 2015

      Cultures in Movement

      by Editor(s): Martine Raibaud, Micéala Symington, Ionut Untea, David Waterman

      The contributors to this volume encourage a re-thinking of the very notion of culture by examining the experiences, situations and the representations of those who chose – or were forced – to change cultures from the nineteenth century to the present day. Beyond a simple study of migration, forced or otherwise, this collective work also re-examines the model of integration. As recent entrants into new social settings may be perceived as affecting the previously-accepted social equilibrium, mechanisms encouraging or inhibiting population flows are sometimes put in place. From this perspective, “integration” may become less a matter of internal choice than an external obligation imposed by the dominant political power, in which case “integration” may only be a euphemism for cultural uniformity. The strategies of cultural survival developed as a reaction to such a rising tide of cultural uniformity can be seen as necessary points of departure for an ever-growing shared multiculturalism. A long-term voluntary commitment to make cultural boundaries more flexible and allow a more engaged individual participation in the process of defining the self and finding its place within a culture in movement may represent a key element for cultural cohesion in a globalized world.

    • History of the Americas
      April 2009

      Black and White Masculinity in the American South, 1800-2000

      by Editor(s): Lydia Plath and Sergio Lussana

      This book consists of a range of essays written by historians and literary critics which examine the historical construction of Southern masculinities, rich and poor, white and black, in a variety of contexts, from slavery in the antebellum period, through the struggle for Civil Rights, right up to the recent South. Building on the rich historiography of gender and culture in the South undertaken in recent years, this volume aims to highlight the important role Southern conceptions of masculinity have played in the lives of Southern men, and to reflect on how masculinity has intersected with class, race and power to structure the social relationships between blacks and whites throughout the history of the South. The volume highlights the multifaceted nature of Southern masculinities, demonstrating the changing ways black and white masculinities have been both imagined and practised over the years, while also emphasizing that conceptions of black and white masculinity in the American South rarely seem to be divorced from wider questions of class, race and power.

    • Cultural studies
      August 2011

      Brazilian Railway Culture

      by Author(s): Martin Cooper

      Brazilian Railway Culture examines the cultural relationship Brazil has had with its railways since tracks were first laid by British, American and French engineers in the nineteenth century.‘Railway’ and ‘Brazil’ are words not often found in the same sentence. Yet each year over seven hundred million passengers are carried by train in the major urban centres, and tens of thousands of visitors enjoy heritage steam rides at over a dozen restored lines and museums.Brazilian Railway Culture starts from the premise that Brazilian society and culture is not just samba, football and sex. The book takes a journey through Brazilian cultural output from 1865 to the present day, examining novels, poetry, music, art, film and television, as well as autobiographies, written histories, and museums to uncover ways in which the railway has been represented.This interdisciplinary study engages with theories of informal empire and postcolonialism, Latin American studies, cultural studies, film and television studies, literary criticism, art history and criticism, museum and heritage studies, as well as railway studies.This is a supplementary text for use by students on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses. It will also be of interest to academics, researchers, and railway historians across a range of disciplines.

    • International relations
      September 2018

      The Cultural Fabric of the Americas

      Essays from the 21st Annual Eugene Scassa MOAS Conference

      by Editor(s): Joshua Hyles

      This collection of essays includes papers presented at the 21st annual Eugene Scassa Mock OAS Conference, an inter-collegiate competition and prestigious academic conference focused on inter-American political systems and the politics, history, and culture of the Americas. The volume includes papers on US-Mexico and Mexico-Spain business relations written by experts from universities in Mexico; Organisation of American States intervention in Cuba and Venezuela; social histories of Mexico involving women’s rights, civil rights of immigrants in the American Southwest, and the history and nuance of LGBT groups in Mexico; quantitative analysis of protest movements in Chile; religious history as pertaining to politics in the early United States; and a series of three short papers on the importance and legacy of sugar in the Caribbean. Written by recognized authorities in their fields and by promising new scholars alike, the collection presents a wide assortment of viewpoints and research backgrounds to portray the Americas and its vast and diverse cultural fabric.

    • Politics & government
      August 2013

      Latin American Bureaucracy and the State Building Process (1780-1860)

      by Editor(s): Juan Carlos Garavaglia and Juan Pro Ruiz

      The process of construction of national states had a decisive moment during the period of revolutions that spanned from the end of the eighteenth century until the mid-nineteenth century. Even if it was a generalized process throughout the Western world, the majority of social scientists that have analyzed it have based their theoretical models on the European and North American experiences. This volume pays particular attention to the historical experience of Latin America and accounts for its distinctive regional and national characteristics through the analysis of cases. It also evokes the existence of certain features of the process that historiography has not sufficiently taken into consideration until now. This book provides the first detailed perspective of the formation of the State’s bureaucracies in Latin America, a long and complex process shaped by the political, economic, social, and cultural conditions of different countries in the continent. These bureaucracies absorbed and institutionalized the pre-existing configurations of power while simultaneously transforming them. The essays included in this book offer an innovative vantage point for the analysis of issues that continue to be crucial in present-day Latin America, such as those that involve the relations between the State and society.

    • History of the Americas
      May 2014

      Masks of Identity

      Representing and Performing Otherness in Latin America

      by Editor(s): Přemysl Mácha, Eloy Gómez-Pellón

      This collection of essays offers some thoughts on alterity/otherness in anthropological praxis viewed through the prism of the Latin American reality. It is neither an exhaustive treatment of the problem of Otherness in anthropological theory nor a definitive analysis of the various forms of represented, practiced, and contested alterities in Latin American history. Rather, the authors have been brought together by several common concerns. The first is an interest in exploring and understanding some of the ways in which Otherness structures social relations at the everyday as well as the national levels. The second is a theoretical and methodological question of how the perspective which foregrounds the Other at the expense of the Self might make the anthropological inquiry more effective and emancipatory. Thirdly, the authors are interested in how they can, as researchers, teachers, and citizens, help overcome cleavages which group identities constantly produce in the body of humanity.The Others that the authors of this book explore include indigenous peoples, mestizos, African slaves, women, insurgent peasants, as well as hybrid groups (re-)claiming a new identity. While each of the eight authors focuses on social phenomena from different time periods and parts of Latin America, they all share as their common denominator the Spanish colonization of the continent which set off a series of events whose consequences eventually exceeded the wildest fantasies of the boldest thinkers of these times. The authors particularly focus on the visual representation and performance of alterity, but also give room to some non-visual ways in which Otherness is established and subverted. Inevitably, this volume presents a diverse selection of contributions which nevertheless share some common problems, concerns and hopes, which in their totality provide a complex picture of Otherness in everyday life in historical and contemporary Latin America.

    • Cultural studies
      August 2014

      Indigenous Perspectives of North America

      A Collection of Studies

      by Editor(s): Enikő Sepsi, Judit Nagy, Miklós Vassányi, János Kenyeres

      The present volume brings to North American Native Studies – with its rich tradition and accumulated expertise in the Central European region – the new complexities and challenges of contemporary Native reality. The umbrella theme ‘Indigenous perspectives’ brings together researchers from a great variety of disciplines, focusing on issues such as democracy and human rights, international law, multiculturalism, peace and security, economic and scientific development, sustainability, literature, and arts and culture, as well as religion.The thirty-five topical and thought-provoking articles written in English, French and Spanish offer a solid platform for further critical investigations and a useful tool for classroom discussions in a wide variety of academic fields.

    • Literary studies: general
      May 2006

      Florida Studies

      Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association

      by Editor(s): Steve Glassman

      Florida was the first region of the United States to be discovered, explored, and, after a fashion, settled by Euroamericans. Its population in the early 21st century is approaching 17 million. Within years the number of people living in the state will surpass those living in New York, and the Sunshine State will become the most populous area east of the Mississippi. The first book in English about Florida was written by Jean Ribault. A French adventurer, Ribault established a colony of Huguenots near present-day Jacksonville. He was captured by the very able Spanish commander Pedro Menendez, who ordered his French rival and all his minions killed.The state’s long and colorful past is matched by its equally long and colorful literary production. Strangely, critical assessment of Florida literature has lagged far behind. With this volume, the Florida College English Association has formally begun an effort to correct this lamentable oversight. Included are papers on every aspect of Florida literature and history by scholars from every part of the state who are employed in every kind of institution of higher learning. Of special interest are the studies of Florida literature in the 19th century and in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, areas that are generally ignored in national journals. The papers on the contributions of African-American literary figures, such as Zora Hurston and James Weldon Johnson, are noteworthy. Of particular interest are the suggestions for teaching Florida studies in the classroom, which can be adapted for high school as well as college students.

    • Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers
      May 2016

      Knowledge Dissemination in the Long Nineteenth Century

      European and Transatlantic Perspectives

      by Editor(s): Marina Dossena, Stefano Rosso

      Distinctive in its markedly interdisciplinary approach, this book presents studies dealing with literary, cultural and linguistic history both in Europe and in the US, bringing together scholars from different fields, while highlighting features that are shared among their contributions. It offers new insights into phenomena which have generally been under-investigated, such as the role played by popular culture, music, and the arts in the circulation of information, in the construction of popular taste, and even in scientific popularisation on both sides of the Atlantic. As for the choice to focus on the nineteenth century, this is dictated by the fact that, in those decades, for the first time in history, scientific, technological, and social developments accelerated simultaneously. It is, therefore, important to see how such new knowledge was circulated among an ever-growing audience by means of different genres and text types, bearing in mind that divisions between the literary and non-literary were hardly as sharp as they are today.The book presents contributions by Robert-Louis Abrahamson, Nicholas Brownlees, Bruno Cartosio, Sonia Di Loreto, Aileen Dillane, Marina Dossena, Kirsten Lawson, Angela Locatelli, William H. Mulligan, Jr., Stefano Rosso, and Polina Shvanyukova.

    • Conservatism & right-of-centre democratic ideologies
      November 2005

      American Conservatism

      History, Theory and Practice

      by Author(s): Brian Farmer

      American Conservatism: History, Theory, and Practice from Brian R. Farmer is a history of conservatism in the United States that illuminates the odyssey of American conservatism beginning with the Pilgrims and Puritans of the early colonial period and proceeding through the Revolutionary era, the Antebellum period, the Age of Laissez-Faire, Post-Depression Conservatism, the Reagan Era, and concluding with the ideologies and policies of the George W. Bush Administration, arguably the most ideologically driven conservative administration in American history. Conservatism in general and the multiple facets of conservatism are defined, and the political socialization process that produces and perpetuates political ideologies in general and conservatism in particular are presented, to lay the groundwork for the rich history of American people, policies, and events that have surrounded those conservative ideologies that follows. Farmer provides a tool for those interested in American Politics in general and American conservatism in particular with a tool that helps explain the historical development of American ideological conservatism, both in a theoretical sense, and in a policy sense, and thus draws a connection between the American past and what must be considered an exceptional conservative American administration, even by American standards, under George W. Bush. Farmer illustrates that the basic ideological underpinnings that have driven the Bush administration that have generally been viewed by Europeans as “exceptional,” have been present in American politics since its earliest colonial beginnings with the Puritans and been carried forward by the ideological descendants of the Puritans from that time through the present. In essence, the form of American conservative “exceptionalism” exhibited during the Bush administration was present in American politics from the very beginning and has continued through the present, albeit in a more extreme form since the traditional ideological conservatives currently dominate all three branches of the American government and the terror attacks of 9/11 allowed them to garner popular support for their “exceptional” programs.

    • Interdisciplinary studies
      May 2012

      New Frontiers in Latin American Borderlands

      by Editor(s): Leslie G. Cecil

      Approximately 500 years after the first borderlands were being constructed in Latin America to distinguish the indigenous population from their colonizers, boundaries are still being created in Latin America.Although borders still exist, the reasons for their construction and maintenance in the current global world have expanded. Today, Latin American borders include the traditional political borders, as well as more non-traditional borders reflected in art, gender, and social programs.Because borders and the concept of borders are constantly changing, the chapters in this edited volume present a reexamination of the more traditionally defined political borders, as well as those that are constructed by the human body, art, and social policy. The chapters naturally separate into four different general topics: 1) traditional transnational borders, 2) borders and the gendered body, 3) borders as depicted in art, and 4) borders and social programs.

    • Other non-Christian religions
      March 2012

      THE COMPLETE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE INCA EMPIRE

      A comprehensive encyclopedia of the Incas and other ancient peoples of South America with more than 1000 photographs

      by Dr David M Jones

      The history of the Incas fascinates the modern world. This groundbreaking book separates fact from fiction, exploring the native peoples of Peru and the Andes, their mythologies and ancient belief systems, and the amazing beauty of Inca art and architecture. It opens with the culture and history of its many kingdoms and their mythological rituals and beliefs. The second half of the book focuses on the day-to-day lives of ordinary people and the beautiful art they created, such as ceramics, gold- and silverwork, and fabrics. This authoritative volume combines over 1000 striking illustrations with lively and engaging text. THE COMPLETE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE INCA EMPIRE A comprehensive encyclopedia of the Incas and other ancient peoples of South America with more than 1000 photographs Dr David M Jones CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE BOOK IN DIGITAL FORM

    • History of the Americas
      November 2013

      MYTHOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN NATIONS

      An illustrated encyclopedia of the gods, heroes, spirits, sacred places, rituals and ancient beliefs of the North American Indian, Inuit, Aztec, Inca and Maya nations

      by David M. Jones Brian L. Molyneaux

      Here is a rich source of information for any reader who wants to understand the myths and religions of the indigenous inhabitants of America. The book is divided into three sections, each focusing on the mythology of distinct civilizations and regions. North American Mythology explores the universal themes of creation and the mythical living landscape. Mesoamerican Mythology explores the culture and beliefs of the Maya and Aztecs. South American Mythology focuses on the immense Inca empire. An instantly accessible A-to-Z format provides concise, easy-to-locate entries on more than 900 key characters, enabling the reader to discover who is who in the mythology of the Americas. MYTHOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN NATIONS An illustrated encyclopedia of the gods, heroes, spirits, sacred places, rituals and ancient beliefs of the North American Indian, Inuit, Aztec, Inca and Maya nations David M. Jones and Brian L. Molyneaux CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE BOOK IN DIGITAL FORM

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