• History
      November 2015

      Jimmy Hoffa Called My Mom A Bitch: Profiles in Stupidity

      by Jason H. Vines

      The book is broken up into various chapters of stupidity: Stupid Democrats, Stupid Republicans, Stupid Atheists, Stupid Christians, Stupid Criminals, Stupid Policies, Stupid People and so on. The “Stupid Criminals” chapter contains one of my favorite columns that appeared on the Detroit News’ political website. The June 29, 2010 column is titled “Globe Al Warming Gets Rubbed the Wrong Way,” and it takes on allegations that the former VP got inappropriately horny with female masseuse at a Portland, Oregon hotel. That column also continues the sick, yet hilarious saga of Otis “Masturgate” Mathis, the illiterate (no kidding), former head of Detroit Public Schools who was forced out after he admittedly fondled himself in front of numerous female superintendents. No, I am not making this up. I coined the scandal “Masturgate” and it soon became the rage in Detroit media and made my column one of the most popular on the site.

    • History

      AmaZizi: the Dlamini of Southern Africa 2nd Ed

      by Jongisilo Z. Z. Pokwana Ka Menziwa, Ngangomzi Pokwana Ah! Jongumhlaba

      The Dlamini people are a stock race that, during the 19th century, spread throughout the then largely uninhabited Southern Africa. Today they can be found concentrated in Swaziland, in the Eastern Cape, in KwaZulu Natal and in many other parts of the country. The first edition traced a story of these people from before 2000 years ago until today, then focused on a section of the Dlamini known as AmaZizi. The second edition expands this base with new research and information. If you have the surname Dlamini, the history and traditions of your ancestors can be found within these pages.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      March 2017

      Tyne after Tyne

      An Environmental History of a River’s Battle for Protection 1529–2015

      by Leona J. Skelton

      Over the last five centuries, North-East England’s River Tyne went largely with the flow as it rode with us on a rollercoaster from technologically limited early modern oligarchy, to large-scale Victorian ‘improvement’, to twentieth-century deoxygenation and twenty-first-century efforts to expand biodiversity. Studying five centuries of Tyne conservatorship reveals that 1855 to 1972 was a blip on the graph of environmental concern, preceded and followed by more sustainable engagement and a fairer negotiation with the river’s forces and expressions as a whole and natural system, albeit driven by different motivations. Even during this blip, however, several organisations, tried to protect the river’s environmental health from harm. This Tyne study offers a template for a future body of work on British rivers that dislodges the Thames as the river of choice in British environmental history. And it undermines traditional approaches to rivers as passive backdrops of human activities. Departing from narratives that equated change with improvement, or with loss and destruction, it moves away from morally loaded notions of better or worse, and even dead, rivers. The book fully situates the Tyne’s fluvial transformations within political, economic, cultural, social and intellectual contexts. With such a long view, we can objectify ourselves through our descendants’ eyes, reconnecting us not only to our past, but also to our future. Let us sit with the Tyne itself, some of its salmon, a seventeenth-century Tyne River Court Juror, some nineteenth-century Tyne Improvement Commissioners, a 1920s biologist, a twentieth-century Tyne angler, shipbuilder and council planner and some twenty-first-century Tyne Rivers Trust volunteers. Where would they agree and disagree? How would they explain their conceptualisation of what the river is for and how it should be used and regulated? This book takes you to the heart of such virtual debates to revive, reconnect and reinvigorate the severed bonds and flows linking riparian places, issues and people across five centuries.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      December 2016

      THE ECLIPSE OF URBANISM AND THE GREENING OF PUBLIC SPACE.

      Image Making and the Search for a Commons in the United States, 1682–1865

      by Mark Luccarelli

      In The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space: Image Making and the Search for a Commons in the United States, 1682–1865, Mark Luccarelli pushes past unproductive mind/body debates by rooting the rise of environmental awareness in the political and geographical history of the US. Considering history in terms of the categorical development of space – social, territorial and conceptual – the book examines the forces that drove people to ignore their surroundings by distancing culture from place and by assiduously advancing the dissolution of social bonds. Thus beneath the question of the surround, and the key to its renewal today, is the quest to re-engage the common. The latter is still a part of the approach to space, its arrangement and disposition, and has a necessary environmental dimension. Concepts of urbanism, place identity, picturesque landscape and nature are part of a larger Western intellectual and cultural context but, by examining the imaging of cities and landscape, Luccarelli links particular American geographic settings – as well as the political ideals and practices of the republic – to the application and aesthetic reading of these ideas. The advocates of these various perspectives shared an aesthetic orientation as a means of redefining or recovering the common. The book looks at various American urban and regional contexts, as well as the work of artists, writers and public figures, including painter and engraver William Birch, Thomas Jefferson, engraver John Hill, Henry David Thoreau and Frederick Law Olmsted. Luccarelli embeds his environmental study in the works of these men and in the course of American history between the planting of the city of Philadelphia and the establishment of Olmsted’s major urban parks.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2012

      The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus

      The True Life and Trials of Nicholas of Myra

      by Adam C. English

      With his rosy cheeks and matching red suit—and ever-present elf and reindeer companions—Santa Claus may be the most identifiable of fantastical characters. But what do we really know of jolly old Saint Nicholas, "patron saint" of Christmastime? Ask about the human behind the suit, and the tale we know so well quickly fades into myth and folklore.In The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, religious historian Adam English tells the true and compelling tale of Saint Nicholas, bishop of Myra. Around the fourth century in what is now Turkey, a boy of humble circumstance became a man revered for his many virtues. Chief among them was dealing generously with his possessions, once lifting an entire family out of poverty with a single--and secret--gift of gold, so legend tells. Yet he was much more than virtuous. As English reveals, Saint Nicholas was of integral influence in events that would significantly impact the history and development of the Christian church, including the Council of Nicaea, the destruction of the temple to Artemis in Myra, and a miraculous rescue of three falsely accused military officers. And Nicholas became the patron saint of children and sailors, merchants and thieves, as well as France, Russia, Greece, and myriad others.Weaving together the best historical and archaeological evidence available with the folklore and legends handed down through generations, English creates a stunning image of this much venerated Christian saint. With prose as enjoyable as it is informative, he shows why the life--and death--of Nicholas of Myra so radically influenced the formation of Western history and Christian thought, and did so in ways many have never realized. ; 1. Finding St. Nicholas2. Out of a Dying World Comes a Light3. Three Gifts and One Election4. The Work of Victory5. Riots, Beheadings, and Other Near Misfortunes6. Death Is Only the BeginningNotesRecommended ReadingsIndex

    • Islam
      October 2016

      Muslims and the Making of America

      by Amir Hussain

      "There has never been an America without Muslims"—so begins Amir Hussain, one of the most important scholars and teachers of Islam in America. Hussain, who is himself an American Muslim, contends that Muslims played an essential role in the creation and cultivation of the United States. Memories of 9/11 and the rise of global terrorism fuel concerns about American Muslims. The fear of American Muslims in part stems from the stereotype that all followers of Islam are violent extremists who want to overturn the American way of life. Inherent to this stereotype is the popular misconception that Islam is a new religion to America. In Muslims and the Making of America Hussain directly addresses both of these stereotypes. Far from undermining America, Islam and American Muslims have been, and continue to be, important threads in the fabric of American life. Hussain chronicles the history of Islam in America to underscore the valuable cultural influence of Muslims on American life. He then rivets attention on music, sports, and culture as key areas in which Muslims have shaped and transformed American identity. America, Hussain concludes, would not exist as it does today without the essential contributions made by its Muslim citizens. ; Introduction: The American Ideal and Islam1. Islam in America: A Short History2. Blues for Allah: Music3. The Greatest: Sports4. American Mosques: CultureConclusion: The Poetry of Ordinary American Muslim Lives

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      November 2014

      The Burghers of Ceylon

      Race, Representation, Identity

      by Andrew Elsby

      The Burghers of Ceylon traces the origins and history of the mixed-race populations of imperial Ceylon. It explains how, and why, those populations emerged, how they developed, how they were distinguished – and how they distinguished themselves – from the Europeans and from the native populations. It explores the components of burgher identity. The author also provides answers to the following questions. How reliable is the evidence of the Dutch Burgher Union’s genealogies? How prevalent is racial misrepresentation, and what were the motives behind it? How were the mixed-race populations treated by the European colonial powers? What happened to those mixed-race populations when colonial rule ended in 1948? The author’s interest in the burghers of Ceylon came about after his mother’s death, when he discovered she was from a Dutch burgher family in Ceylon. Her mother was half English and half native, and her father, Raoul Frank, was a Dutch burgher descended from a long line of German, French, Dutch, Belgian and British European male ancestors, with native or mixed-race female ancestors from the Dutch and British periods in Ceylon.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2018

      Why China did not have a Renaissance – and why that matters

      An interdisciplinary Dialogue

      by Thomas Maissen, Barbara Mittler

      Concepts of historical progress or decline and the idea of a cycle of historical movement have existed in many civilizations. In spite of claims that they be transnational or even universal, periodization schemes invariably reveal specific social and cultural predispositions.Our dialogue, which brings together a Sinologist and a scholar of early modern History in Europe, considers periodization as a historical phenomenon, studying the case of the “Renaissance.” Understood in the tradition of J. Burckhardt, who referred back to ideas voiced by the humanists of the 14th and 15th centuries, and focusing on the particularities of humanist dialogue which informed the making of the “Renaissance” in Italy, our discussion highlights elements that distinguish it from other movements that have proclaimed themselves as “r/Renaissances,” studying, in particular, the Chinese Renaissance in the early 20th century.While disagreeing on several fundamental issues, we suggest that interdisciplinary and interregional dialogue is a format useful to addressing some of the more far-reaching questions in global history, e.g. whether and when a periodization scheme such as “Renaissance” can fruitfully be applied to describe non-European experiences.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2018

      Interpretations of Jihad in South Asia

      An Intellectual History

      by Tariq Rahman

      In the wake of radical Islamist terrorist attacks described as jihad worldwide and in South Asia, it is imperative that there should be a book-length study of this idea in this part of the world. The focus of the study is the idea of jihad with its changing interpretations mostly those available in exegetical literature of key figures in South Asia. The hermeneutic devices used to understand the meaning of the Quranic verses and the Prophetic traditions relating to jihad will be the focus of this study. The main thrust of the study is to understand how interpretations of jihad vary. It is seen as being both defensive and aggressive by traditionalists; only defensive and mainly about moral improvement by progressive Muslims; and being insurrectionist, aggressive, eternal and justifying violence against civilians by radical Islamists. One purpose of the book is to understand how the radical interpretation came to South Asia. The book also explains how theories about jihad are influenced by the political and social circumstances of the period and how these insights feed into practice legitimizing militant movements called jihad for that period.

    • History
      November 2018

      The Spanish Anarchists of Northern Australia

      Revolution in the Sugar Cane Fields

      by Robert Mason

      This book connects histories of Australia and the British Empire, with Spain and the Spanish-speaking world. It follows the unexpected passage of a group of radical Spanish-speakers in the isolated region of northern Australia during the first half of the twentieth-century, a period of rapidly expanding globalisation as well as the duration of the Spanish Civil War. The present study explores how their community responded to these rapid changes through the lessons of the Spanish-speaking world.

    • History
      November 2018

      Soul-Health

      Therapeutic Reading in Later Medieval England

      by Daniel McCann

      This is a book about reading and healing. It shows how literature that makes us feel sad, horrified, or fearful was understood to bring about health of the soul in the Middle Ages. Over five chapters, it considers a specific set of negative emotions and demonstrates precisely how words can evoke strong feelings.

    • Regional & national history
      February 2019

      Arthur in the Celtic Languages

      The Arthurian Legend in Celtic Literature and Traditions

      by Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan and Erich Poppe

      A collection of essays providing a reliable, accessible and up-to-date introduction to Arthurian literature and popular traditions in the Celtic languages, from the early Middle Ages to the twentieth century. The figure of Arthur and the characters associated with him change as the stories are reworked for audiences in the different countries and at different periods.

    • History
      May 2019

      Freedom Music

      Wales, Emancipation and Jazz 1850-1950

      by Jen Wilson

      This book traces the story of how early African American and jazz music came to Wales. From Abolitionist collaborations, minstrelsy, ‘weird slave songs’, ragtime, blues, hot music and swing, the story unfolds through women’s emancipation and gender politics, social history and the heritage and culture of Wales.

    • African history
      September 2018

      Protection, Patronage, or Plunder? British Machinations and (B)uganda’s Struggle for Independence

      by Author(s): Apollo N. Makubuya

      In the scramble for Africa, Britain took a lion’s share of the continent. It occupied and controlled vast territories, including the Uganda Protectorate – which it ruled for 68 years. Early administrators in the region encountered the progressive kingdom of Buganda, which they incorporated into the British Empire. Under the guise of protection, indirect rule and patronage, Britain overran, plundered and disempowered the kingdom’s traditional institutions. On liquidation of the Empire, Buganda was coaxed into a problematic political order largely dictated from London. Today, 56 years after independence, the kingdom struggles to rediscover itself within Uganda’s fragile politics. Based on newly de-classified records, this book reconstructs a history of the machinations underpinning British imperial interests in (B)Uganda and the personalities who embodied colonial rule. It addresses Anglo-Uganda relations, demonstrating how Uganda’s politics reflects its colonial past, and the forces shaping its future. It is a far-reaching examination of British rule in (B)uganda, questioning whether it was designed for protection, for patronage or for plunder.

    • History
      October 2019

      The Economy of Medieval Wales, 1067-1536

      by Matthew Frank Stevens

      This book surveys the economy of Wales from Norman invasion to Anglo-Welsh union. Key themes include the evolution of the agrarian economy; the growth of towns; the adoption of a money economy; English colonization; the collapse of native Welsh social structures and the rise of economic individualism; the disastrous effect of the Glyndŵr rebellion; and alignment with the English economy.

    • Asian history
      March 2020

      Uniquely Okinawan

      Determining Identity During the U.S. Wartime Occupation

      by Courtney A. Short

      Since 1945 and continuing for as far and one can foresee, the issue of U.S. forces struggling on battlegrounds with large, potentially hostile, culturally diverse populations will continue to resonate. The “lessons learned” from Okinawa will continue to provide guidance.

    • General & world history

      A Greater Love

      by Olga Watkins

      The true story of a woman's incredible journey into the heart of the Third Reich to find the man she loves. When the Gestapo seize 20-year-old Olga Czepf's fiance she is determined to find him and sets off on an extraordinary 2,000-mile search across Nazi-occupied Europe risking betrayal, arrest and death. As the Second World War heads towards its bloody climax, she refuses to give up - even when her mission leads her to the gates of Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps... Now 89 and living in London, Olga tells with remarkable clarity of the courage and determination that drove her across war-torn Europe, to find the man she loved. The greatest untold true love story of World War Two.

    • Development studies
      January 2015

      South Sudan: A Slow Liberation

      by Edward Thomas

      In 2011, South Sudan became an independent country. Its long liberation struggle was an attempt to right the wrongs of brutal colonial conquest, deliberate neglect and racial oppression organized by governments headquartered at Khartoum. The long struggle has had a violent aftermath. The war of liberation has been marked by looting, raids and massacres that pitted ethnic communities against each other. In this remarkably comprehensive work, Edward Thomas provides a multi-layered examination of what is happening in the country today. Writing from the perspective of South Sudan's most mutinous hinterland, Jonglei state, the book explains how this area was at the heart of South Sudan's liberation. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and a broad range of sources, this book gives a sharply focused, fresh account of South Sudan's long, unfinished struggle for liberation.

    • Politics & government
      February 2014

      Africa's Peacemakers

      Nobel Peace Laureates of African Descent

      by Adekeye Adebajo

      As Africa and its diaspora commemorate fifty years of post-independence Pan-Africanism, this unique volume provides profound insight into the thirteen prominent individuals of African descent who have won the Nobel Peace Prize since 1950. From the first American president of African descent, Barack Obama, whose career was inspired by the civil rights and anti-apartheid struggles promoted by fellow Nobel Peace laureates Martin Luther King, Jr., Nelson Mandela, Desmond Tutu, and Albert Luthuli; to influential figures in peacemaking such as Ralph Bunche, Anwar Sadat, Kofi Annan, and F.W. De Klerk; as well as Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, Wangari Maathai, and Mohamed El-Baradei, who have been variously involved in women's rights, environmental protection, and nuclear disarmament, Africa's Peacemakers reveals how this remarkable collection of individuals have changed the world - for better or worse.

    • Historical fiction
      June 2013

      Across Great Divides

      by Monique Roy

      Across Great Divides is a timeless story of the upheavals of war, the power of family, and the resiliency of human spirit. When Hitler came to power in 1933, one Jewish family refused to be destroyed and defied the Nazis only to come up against another struggle—confronting apartheid in South Africa. The novel chronicles the story of Eva and Inge, two identical twin sisters growing up in Nazi Germany. As Jews, life becomes increasingly difficult for them and their family under the Nazi regime. After witnessing the horrors of Kristallnacht, they realize they must leave their beloved homeland if they hope to survive. They travel to Antwerp, Belgium, and then on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, chasing the diamond trade in hopes of finding work for their father, a diamond merchant. Finally, they find a home in beautiful South Africa and begin to settle down. But just as things begin to feel safe, their new home becomes caught up in it’s own battles of bigotry and hate under the National Party’s demand for an apartheid South Africa. Eva and Inge wonder if they will ever be allowed to live in peace, though they cling to the hope for a better day when there will be “an understanding of the past, compassion for all humanity, and …hope and courage to move forward across great divides.” Worldwide rights are available for this novel. I would like to sell Across Great Divides in Europe, Africa and Asia. The readership for Across Great Divides are history buffs, both female and male, and all ages, from late teens through adult.

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