• History
      November 2018

      The Spanish Anarchists of Northern Australia

      Revolution in the Sugar Cane Fields

      by Robert Mason

      This book connects histories of Australia and the British Empire, with Spain and the Spanish-speaking world. It follows the unexpected passage of a group of radical Spanish-speakers in the isolated region of northern Australia during the first half of the twentieth-century, a period of rapidly expanding globalisation as well as the duration of the Spanish Civil War. The present study explores how their community responded to these rapid changes through the lessons of the Spanish-speaking world.

    • History
      November 2018

      Soul-Health

      Therapeutic Reading in Later Medieval England

      by Daniel McCann

      This is a book about reading and healing. It shows how literature that makes us feel sad, horrified, or fearful was understood to bring about health of the soul in the Middle Ages. Over five chapters, it considers a specific set of negative emotions and demonstrates precisely how words can evoke strong feelings.

    • Regional & national history
      February 2019

      Arthur in the Celtic Languages

      The Arthurian Legend in Celtic Literature and Traditions

      by Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan and Erich Poppe

      A collection of essays providing a reliable, accessible and up-to-date introduction to Arthurian literature and popular traditions in the Celtic languages, from the early Middle Ages to the twentieth century. The figure of Arthur and the characters associated with him change as the stories are reworked for audiences in the different countries and at different periods.

    • History
      May 2019

      Freedom Music

      Wales, Emancipation and Jazz 1850-1950

      by Jen Wilson

      This book traces the story of how early African American and jazz music came to Wales. From Abolitionist collaborations, minstrelsy, ‘weird slave songs’, ragtime, blues, hot music and swing, the story unfolds through women’s emancipation and gender politics, social history and the heritage and culture of Wales.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2016

      A History of Money

      by Glyn Davies New edition updated and edited by Dr. Duncan Connors

      A History of Money looks at how money as we know it developed through time. Starting with the barter system, the basic function of exchanging goods evolved into a monetary system based on coins made up of precious metals and, from the 1500s onwards, financial systems were established through which money became intertwined with commerce and trade, to settle by the mid-1800s into a stable system based upon Gold. This book presents its closing argument that, since the collapse of the Gold Standard, the global monetary system has undergone constant crisis and evolution continuing into the present day.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2019

      A Little Gay History of Wales

      by Daryl Leeworthy

      A Little Gay History of Wales tells the compelling story of Welsh LGBT life from the Middle Ages to the present day. Drawing on a rich array of archival sources from across Britain, together with oral testimony and material culture, this pioneering study is the first to examine the experiences of ordinary LGBT men and women, and how they embarked on coming out, coming together and changing the world. This is the story of poets who wrote about same-sex love and translators who worked to create a language to describe it; activists who campaigned for equality and politicians who created the legislation providing it; teenagers ringing advice lines for guidance on coming out, and revellers in the pioneering bars and clubs on a Friday and Saturday night. It is also a study of prejudice and of intolerance, of emigration and isolation, of HIV/AIDS and Section 28 – all features of the complex historical reality of LGBT life and same-sex desire. Engaging and accessible, absorbing and perceptive, this book is an important advance in our understanding of Welsh history.

    • History
      October 2019

      The Economy of Medieval Wales, 1067-1536

      by Matthew Frank Stevens

      This book surveys the economy of Wales from Norman invasion to Anglo-Welsh union. Key themes include the evolution of the agrarian economy; the growth of towns; the adoption of a money economy; English colonization; the collapse of native Welsh social structures and the rise of economic individualism; the disastrous effect of the Glyndŵr rebellion; and alignment with the English economy.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2020

      New Perspectives on Welsh Industrial History

      by Louise Miskell

      The aim of this volume is to tell a story of Welsh industrial history different to the one traditionally dominated by the coal and iron communities of Victorian and Edwardian Wales. Extending their chronological scope from the early eighteenth- to the late twentieth-century, and encompassing a wider range of industries, the essays in this book combine studies of the internal organisation of workplace and production with outward-facing perspectives of Welsh industry in the context of the global economy. The contributors to the volume offer important new insights into the companies, the employers, the markets and the money behind some of the key sectors of the Welsh economy – from coal to copper, and from steel to manufacturing. By acknowledging the numerical significance but often unsung importance of the thousands who worked in domestic service, the book challenges us also to reconsider what we think of as constituting ‘industry’ in Wales.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      October 2019

      Cardiganshire County History Volume 2

      Medieval and Early Modern Cardiganshire

      by G.H. Jenkins, Richard Suggett, Eryn M. White

      Cardiganshire County History Volume 2 provides a comprehensive and authoritative account, written by distinguished authors in fifteen chapters, of the wide range of social, economic, political, religious and cultural forces that shaped the ethos and character of the county of Cardiganshire over a period of 600 years.

    • British & Irish history
      January 2010

      Making Sense of Wales

      A Sociological Perspective

      by Graham Day (Author)

      Making Sense of Wales gives an account of the main changes that have taken place in Welsh society over the last fifty years, as well as analysing the major efforts to interpret those changes. By placing work done in Wales in the context of broader developments within sociological approaches over the period, Graham Day demonstrates that there is a body of work on Wales worth considering in its own right as a specific contribution to sociology. He also shows the relevance of sociological accounts of Wales for understanding contemporary empirical and theoretical concerns in social analysis. Beginning with post-war analysis which considered Wales in terms of regional planning and policy, Day shows how more theoretically informed perspectives have come to the fore in recent years. He also examines more contemporary developments, such as gender and class transformations, the emphasis on the centrality of the Welsh language for conceptions of Wales and Welshness, as well as the impact of new forms of governance and questions of social exclusion.

    • French Revolution
      October 2012

      Welsh Poetry of the French Revolution, 1789-1805

      by Cathryn A. Charnell-White (Author)

      This anthology presents a selection of the poems with which Welsh writers living in Wales and London participated, through the medium of Welsh, to the controversy in Britain surrounding the French Revolution. These Welsh poems have been edited and translated into English for the first time ever. It also considers the cultural inheritance of the French Revolution in eisteddfodic poetry and poems to national heroes in which the competing notions of Welshness and Britishness come to the fore.

    • Social & cultural history
      March 2010

      The Women and Men of 1926

      A Gender and Social History of the General Strike and Miners’ Lockout in South Wales

      by Sue Bruley (Author)

      Work on the miners' Lock-Out of 1926 tends to focus on the perspective of the National Union of Mineworkers, while nothing has been written which attempts to examine, for example, how miner's wives coped for six months without pay. "The Women and Men of 1926" investigates the Lock-Out from the perspective of gender relations, offering a social history of the mining communities in south Wales during the Lock-Out. Sue Bruley aims to analyse how individual families and households coped with the Lock-Out and to assess how gender relations were affected, using hitherto unpublished oral testimony as well as other archive material. Individual chapters consider topics such as school canteens, miners' lodges, recreational activities, picketing and politics.

    • Social & cultural history
      March 2010

      Urban Assimilation in Post-Conquest Wales

      Ethnicity, Gender and Economy in Ruthin, 1282-1348

      by Matthew Frank Stevens (Author)

      This book uses, principally but not only, a case study of the Denbighshire town of Ruthin to discuss both the significance of Englishness versus Welshness and of gender distinctions in the network of small Anglo-Welsh urban centres which emerged in north Wales following the English conquest of 1282. It carefully constructs an image of the way in which townspeople's everyday lives were influenced by their ethnic background, gender, wealth and social status. In this manner it explores and explains the motivations of English and welsh townspeople to work together in the mutual pursuit of prosperity and social stability.

    • British & Irish history
      September 2010

      Royal Wales

      by Deborah Fisher (Author)

      This book covers both the royal families that existed in pre-Conquest Wales and the predominantly English royal families that have ruled over Wales since medieval times. The changing relationships between the rulers and the ruled in Wales are examined, over a period from the early Middle Ages to the present day. The aim is to tell the story of how Wales has figured in the development of the British royal family and its traditions. The author's previous books covered individual members of the royal families; although this book will inevitably cover individuals in the telling of the story, to some extent, the book will concentrate less on the personalities and more on the surrounding tradition and pageantry (e.g., investiture ceremonies), and there is ample scope for covering new ground. An index and select bibliography will be provided, as well as illustrations, the latter largely of monuments and locations in Wales associated with the book's theme.

    • British & Irish history
      November 2012

      Secret Sins

      Sex, Violence & Society in Carmarthenshire 1870-1920

      by Russell Davies (Author)

      Sleepy rustic Carmarthenshire was secretly a hotbed of debauchery, violence and drunkenness according to Russell Davies in a new edition of his very successful book, ‘Secret Sins’. Behind the facade of idyllic rural life, there was a twilight world of mental illness, suicide, crime, vicious assaults, infanticide, cruelty and other assorted acts of depravity. This almost anecdotal historical study is often funny, sometimes disturbing, always revealing.

    • French Revolution
      April 2013

      “Footsteps of Liberty & Revolt”

      Essays on Wales and the French Revolution

      by Mary Ann Constantine (Author), Dafydd Johnston (Author),

      The late eighteenth century was one of the most exciting and unsettling periods in European history, with the shock-waves of the French Revolution rippling around the world. As this collection of essays by leading scholars shows, Wales was no exception. From political pamphlets to a Denbighshire folk-play, from bardic poetry to the remodelling of the Welsh landscape itself, responses to the revolutionary ferment of ideas took many forms. We see how Welsh poets and preachers negotiated complex London–Wales networks of patronage and even more complex issues of national and cultural loyalty; and how the landscape itself is reimagined in fiction, remodelled à la Rousseau, while it rapidly emptied as impoverished farming families emigrated to the New World. Drawing on a wealth of vibrant material in both Welsh and English, much of it unpublished, this collection marks another important contribution to ‘four nations’ criticism, and offers new insights into the tensions and flashpoints of Romantic-period Wales.

    • French Revolution
      January 2014

      Y Chwyldro Ffrengig a’r Anterliwt

      Hanes Bywyd a Marwolaeth Brenin a Brenhines Ffrainc gan Huw Jones, Glanconwy

      by Ffion Mair Jones (Editor)

      Dyma olygiad o anterliwt gan Huw Jones, Glanconwy, o gyfnod cythryblus y Chwyldro Ffrengig. Cyhoeddwyd y testun ym 1798, ond ni chafodd unrhyw sylw gan ysgolheigion yr anterliwt yn ystod yr ugeinfed ganrif, ac mae’r golygiad hwn yn dwyn drama newydd sbon i’r amlwg mewn anterliwt sy’n adrodd hanes cwymp brenin a brenhines Pabyddol ac unbeniaethol Ffrainc. Ynghyd â’r golygiad o’r anterliwt, cyflwynir yn y gyfrol destun rhai o faledi a cherddi Huw Jones, i ddwyn bardd na chafodd fawr sylw hyd yma i olwg y cyhoedd unwaith eto.

    • Social & cultural history
      March 2015

      A Tolerant Nation?

      Revisiting Ethnic Diversity in a Devolved Wales

      by Paul O’ Leary (Editor), Charlotte Williams (Editor), Neil Evans (Editor)

      The population of Wales is the product of successive waves of immigration. During the industrial revolution many diverse groups were attracted into Wales by the economic opportunities it offered – notably Irish people, black and minority ethnic sailors from many parts of the world, and people from continental Europe. More recently, there has been immigration from the New Commonwealth as well as refugees from wars and oppression in several parts of the world. This volume engages with this experience by offering perspectives from historians, sociologists, cultural analysts and social policy experts. It provides analyses of the changing patterns of immigration and their reception including hostile and violent acts. It also considers the way in which Welsh attitudes to minorities have been shaped in the past through the activity of missionaries in the British Empire, and how these have permeated literary perceptions of Wales. In the contemporary world, this diverse population has implications for social policy which are explored in a number of contexts, including in rural Wales. The achievements of minorities in sport and in building a multi-racial community in Butetown, for instance, which is now writing its own history, are recognised. The first edition of this book was widely welcomed as the essential work on the topic; over a decade later much has changed and the volume responds with several new chapters and extensive revisions that engage the impact of devolution on policy in Wales.

    • British & Irish history
      March 2017

      Troy House

      A Tudor estate across time

      by Ann Benson

      This extensive new research volume on the architectural, landscape and ownership histories of the Duke of Beaufort’s Welsh Troy estate, from the twelfth century to the present, reveals its prime historical importance.

    • 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000
      October 2017

      The Communist Party of Great Britain and the National Question in Wales, 1920-1991

      by Douglas Jones

      The first in-depth study of the Communist Party’s attitude to devolution in Wales, to Welsh nationhood and Welsh identity, examined within the context of the rapid changes in twentieth century Welsh society, debates on devolution and identity on the British left, the role of nationalism within the communist movement, and the interplay of international and domestic factors.

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