• Islam
      August 2015

      Contemporary Issues in Islam

      by Asma Afsaruddin

      This book deals with certain "hot-button" contemporary issues in Islam that are often the focus of public scrutiny, including the Sharia, jihad, the caliphate, women’s status, and interfaith relations. Notably, it places the discussion of these topics within a longer historical framework in order to reveal their multiple interpretations and contested applications over time. Most public and some academic discourses however present the Islamic tradition as unchanging and therefore unable to respond to the modern world. Such an ahistorical approach fosters the belief that Muslim and Western societies are destined to clash with one another. In contrast, this book allows the reader to see the diversity and transformations within Islamic thought over time. Focusing on this internal diversity permits us to appreciate the scriptural and intellectual resources available within the Islamic tradition for responding to the challenges of modernity, even as it interrogates and shapes modernity itself. ; This book deals with certain "hot-button" contemporary issues in Islam, including the Shari'a, jihad, the caliphate, women’s status, and interfaith relations. Notably, it places the discussion of these topics within a longer historical framework in order to reveal their multiple interpretations and contested applications over time. ; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. Negotiating the Shoals of Modernity; 2. Engaging the Sharia: Re-reading the Qur’an and Hadith; 3. Islam and Politics; 4. Islam, Gender, and Feminist Hermeneutics; 5. War and Peacemaking in the Islamic Tradition; 6. American Muslims and the Expansion of the Umma; 7. Religious Dialogue and Inter-Faith Relations; Epilogue: Looking to the Future; Bibliography.

    • Political science & theory
      September 2011

      The Politics of Postanarchism

      by Saul Newman

      What is the relevance of anarchism for politics and political theory today? While many have in the past dismissed anarchism, the author contends that anarchism's heretical critique of authority, and its insistence on full equality and liberty, places it at the forefront of the radical political imagination today. With the unprecedented expansion of state power in the name of security, the current 'crisis of capitalism', and the terminal decline of Marxist and social democratic projects, it is time to reconsider anarchism as a form of politics. This book seeks to renew anarchist thought through the concept of postanarchism.This innovative theoretical approach, drawing upon classical anarchist theory, poststructuralism, post-Marxism, critical theory and psychoanalytic approaches, allows for a new engagement with contemporary debates about future directions in radical politics relating to political subjectivity and identity, political organisation, the State, globalisation, liberty and equality today, and the political 'event'. ; Articulates the intersection of anarchism and poststructuralism in order to frame a new approach to politics: ‘postanarchism’. ; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1: The Euthanasia of Government: classical anarchism reconsidered; 2: Crowned Anarchy: towards a postanarchist ontology; 3: An Infantile Disorder: Anarchism and Marxism; 4: The Horizon of Anarchy: radical politics in the wake of Marx; 5: Debating Postanarchism: ontology, ethics and utopia; 6: Conclusion: Postanarchism and Radical Politics Today; Index.

    • Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500
      June 2011

      A History of Everyday Life in Medieval Scotland

      by Edward J Cowan, Lizanne Henderson

      This book examines the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of people in Scotland from the earliest times to 1600. Its purpose is to discover the character of everyday life in Scotland over time and to do so, where possible, within a comparative context. Its focus is on the mundane, but at the same time it takes heed of the people’s experience of wars, famine, environmental disaster and other major causes of disturbance, and assesses the effects of longer-term processes of change in religion, politics, and economic and social affairs. In showing how the extraordinary impinged on the everyday, the book draws on every possible kind of evidence including a diverse range of documentary sources, artefactual, environmental and archaeological material, and the published work of many disciplines. The authors explore the lives of all the people of Scotland and provide unique insights into how the experience of daily life varied across time according to rank, class, gender, age, religion and ethnic group. They look at the contextual nature of everyday experience and consider how this was shaped by national, regional and tribal considerations. They reveal the variations between Highland and Lowland, the Western Isles and the Northern Isles, inland and coastal, and urban and rural. They examine the role played by language, whether Gaelic, Welsh, English, Pictish, Norse, Latin or Scots. The book shows the distinctively Scottish aspects of diurnal life and how, through trading and contact with migrants, the lives of Scots were affected by other cultures and nations. Taken as a whole it represents a new way of looking at medieval Scotland and has implications and relevance for historians and their public across the discipline. ; This book examines the ordinary, routine, daily behaviour, experiences and beliefs of people in Scotland from the earliest times to 1600. ; Contents List of Figures Series Editors' Forward Christopher A. Whatley and Elizabeth Foyster Introduction: Everyday Life in Medieval Scotland Edward J. Cowan and Lizanne Henderson Chapter 1. Landscape and People Fiona Watson Chapter 2. The Worldview of Scottish Vikings in the Age of the Sagas Edward J. Cowan Chapter 3. Sacred and Banal: The Discovery of Everyday Medieval Material Culture Jenny Shiels and Stuart Campbell Chapter 4. The Family David Sellar Chapter 5. 'Hamperit in ane hony came': Sights, Sounds and Smells in the Medieval Town Elizabeth Ewan Chapter 6. Playtime Everday: The Material Culture of Medieval Gaming Mark Hall Chapter 7. Women of Independence in Barbour's Bruce and Blind Harry's Wallace Rebecca Boorsma Chapter 8. Everyday Life in the Histories of Scotland from Walter Bower to George Buchanan Nicola Royan Chapter 9. Disease, Death and the Hereafter in Medieval Scotland Richard D. Oram Chapter 10. 'Detestable Slaves of the Devil': Changing Ideas about Witchcraft in Sixteenth-Century Scotland Lizanne Henderson Chapter 11. Glasgwegians: The First One Thousand Years Edward J. Cowan Chapter 12. Marian Devotion in Scotland and the Shrine of Loreto Audrey-Beth Fitch Annotated Bibliography Notes on the Contributors Index

    • History
      January 2015

      The Great Seljuk Empire

      by A. C. S. Peacock

      The Seljuks, nomadic tribesman in origin, invaded the Middle East in the 11th century and established themselves as sultans in the Islamic tradition. The Great Seljuk Empire became one of the major empires of Middle Eastern history and dominated Centra

    • History
      February 2017

      The Fatimid Empire

      by Michael Brett

      From the 10th century to the end of the 12th century, the Fatimid Empire played a central, yet controversial, role in the history of Islam. This definitive account combines the histories of Isma'ilism, North Africa and Egypt with that of the dynasty. B

    • History
      March 2016

      The Near West

      Medieval North Africa, Latin Europe and the Mediterranean in the Second Axial Age

      by Allen James Fromherz

      This book tells stories of interaction, conflict and common exchange between Berbers, Arabs, Latins, Muslims, Christians and Jews in North Africa and Latin Europe. Medieval Western European and North African history were part of a common Western Mediterranean culture. Examining shared commerce, slavery, mercenary activity, art and intellectual and religious debates, this book argues that North Africa was an integral part of western Medieval History. The book tells the history of North Africa and Europe through the eyes of Christian kings and Muslim merchants, Emirs and Popes, Sufis, Friars and Rabbis. It argues North Africa and Europe together experienced the Twelfth Century Renaissance and the Commercial Revolution. When Europe was highly divided during twelfth century, North Africa was enjoying the peak of its power, united under the Berber, Almohad Empire. In the midst of a common commercial growth throughout the medieval period, North Africa and Europe also shared in a burst of spirituality and mysticism. This growth of spirituality occurred even as representatives of Judaism, Christianity and Islam debated and defended their faiths, dreaming of conversion even as they shared the same rational methods. The growth of spirituality instigated a Second Axial Age in the history of religion. Challenging the idea of a Mediterranean split between between Islam and Christianity, the book shows how the Maghrib (North Africa) was not a Muslim, Arab monolith or as an extension of the exotic Orient. North Africa, not the Holy Land to the far East, was the first place where Latin Europeans encountered the Muslim other and vice versa. Medieval North Africa was as diverse and complex as Latin Europe. North Africa should not be dismissed as a side show of European history. North Africa was, in fact, an integral part of the story. ; This book tells stories of interaction, conflict and common exchange between Berbers, Arabs, Latins, Muslims, Christians and Jews in North Africa and Latin Europe. Using individual biographies, this book argues that North Africa was, in fact, an integral part of western history. ; Map; Personal Note and Acknowledgements; Preface: North Africa and the Mediterranean Paradox; Chapter 1. Bèjaïa: Introducing North Africa, Latin Europe and the Mediterranean; Chapter 2. Rome: North Africa and the Papacy; Chapter 3. Tunis: Axis of the Middle Sea; Chapter 4. Marrakech: The Founding of a City; Chapter 5. The Almohads: Empire of the Western Mediterranean; Chapter 6. Ibn Khaldun and the Fourteenth Century; Chapter 7. Conclusions: Proposing a Second Axial Age; Notes; Bibliography; Index. ; MapPersonal Note and AcknowledgementsPreface: North Africa and the Mediterranean ParadoxChapter 1. Bèjaïa: Introducing North Africa, Latin Europe and the MediterraneanChapter 2. Rome: North Africa and the PapacyChapter 3. Tunis: Axis of the Middle SeaChapter 4. Marrakech: The Founding of a CityChapter 5. The Almohads: Empire of the Western MediterraneanChapter 6. Ibn Khaldun and the Fourteenth CenturyChapter 7. Conclusions: Proposing a Second Axial AgeNotesBibliographyIndex

    • Philosophy: metaphysics & ontology
      May 2012

      Essays on Deleuze

      by Daniel W. Smith

      Gathers 20 of Smith’s new and classic essays into one volume for the first time. Combining his most important pieces over the last 15 years along with two completely new essays, ‘On the Becoming of Concepts’ and ‘The Idea of the Open’, this volume is Smith’s definitive treatise on Deleuze. The four sections cover Deleuze’s use of the history of philosophy, his philosophical system, several Deleuzian concepts and his position within contemporary philosophy. Smith’s essays are frequent references for students and scholars working on Deleuze, and Dan Smith is widely regarded as the world’s leading commentator on Deleuze. Several of the articles have already become touchstones in the field, notably those on Alain Badiou and Jacques Derrida. For anyone interested in Deleuze’s philosophy, this book is not to be missed. ; Brings together 18 key essays, plus two completely new essays, by one of the world's leading commentators on the work of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. ; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Preface; I. Deleuze and the History of Philosophy; 1. Plato; The Concept of the Simulacrum: Deleuze and the Overturning of Platonism; 2. Univocity; The Doctrine of Univocity: Deleuze’s Ontology of Immanence; 3. Leibniz; Deleuze on Leibniz: Difference, Continuity, and the Calculus; 4. Hegel; Deleuze, Hegel, and the Post-Kantian Tradition; 5. Pre- and Post-Kantianism; Logic and Existence: Deleuze on the Conditions of the Real; II. Deleuze’s Philosophical System; 6. Aesthetics; Deleuze’s Theory of Sensation: Overcoming the Kantian Duality; 7. Dialectics; Deleuze, Kant, and the Theory of Immanent Ideas; 8. Analytics; Concepts, Time, and Truth; 9. Ethics; The Place of Ethics in Deleuze’s Philosophy: Three Questions of Immanence; 10. Politics; Flow, Code, and Stock: A Note on Deleuze’s Political Philosophy; III. Five Deleuzian Concepts; 11. Desire; Deleuze and the Question of Desire: Toward an Immanent Theory of Ethics; 12. Life; “A Life of Pure Immanence”: Deleuze’s “Critique et clinique” Project; 13. Sensation; Deleuze on Bacon: Three Conceptual Trajectories in “The Logic of Sensation”; 14. The New ; The Conditions of the New; 15. The Open; The Idea of the Open: Bergson’s Three Theses on Movement; IV. Deleuze and Contemporary Philosophy; 16. Jacques Derrida, Deleuze and Derrida, Immanence and Transcendence: Two Directions in Recent French Thought; 17. Alain Badiou, Mathematics and the Theory of Multiplicities: Deleuze and Badiou Revisited; 18. Jacques Lacan, The Inverse Side of the Structure: Žižek on Deleuze on Lacan; 19. Pierre Klossowski, Klossowski’s Reading of Nietzsche: Impulses, Phantasms, Simulacra, Stereotypes; 20. Paul Patton, Deleuze and the Liberal Tradition: Normativity, Freedom, and Judgment; Bibliography; Notes; Index.

    • Political science & theory
      February 2012

      An Introduction to Political Thought

      A Conceptual Toolkit

      by Peri Roberts, Peter Sutch

      Your conceptual toolkit for the study of political thought. New for this edition Brand new chapter on international political thought, reflecting one of the most striking developments in contemporary political theory This textbook gives you all the vocabulary you need – political, conceptual and historical – to engage confidently and deeply with political thought and the moral and political worlds in which we live. It traces the history of political thought from Plato and Aristotle to Kymlicka and Rorty, following a unique dual structure that introduces key thinkers and core concepts together, making it suitable for any course structure. Topics covered include Universal moral order o liberty o political freedom o the state o socialism o utilitarianism o distributive justice o group politics o multiculturalism o international political theory o conservatism o feminism o postmodernism o global justice Thinkers covered include Plato o Aristotle o Hobbes o Locke o Rousseau o Marx o Bentham o Rawls o Nozick o Walzer o Kymlicka o Parekh o Pogge o Hume o Burke o Oakeshott o Rorty ; This textbook, now in itsa second edition, is designed to equip students with a basic 'conceptual toolkit' for the study of political thought: (i) a basic political vocabulary, (ii) a conceptual vocabulary and (iii) an historical vocabulary. ; [NB: there is a dual table of contents - one allowing the student to follow a chronological path (History of Political Thought), the other allowing a route to be traced through Political Concepts and Ideas]; History of Political Thought/ Political Concepts & Ideas; Introduction; 1: What is Political Theory?/ 1: What is Political Theory?; I: Classical Origins of Political Thought; 2: Plato/ 2: Is There a Universal Moral Order?; 3: Aristotle/ 3: Is Politics Natural?; II: Modern Developments in Political Thought; 4: Hobbes, Locke & Rousseau/ 4: Liberty & Human Nature: What is political freedom?; 5: Social Contractarians: Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau/ 5: Political Legitimacy & the Artificiality of Politics: Why obey the state?; 6: Marx & Socialism/ 6: The Artificiality of Man; III: Contemporary Understandings of Political Thought; 7: Bentham, Utilitarianism and Rights/ 7. How do we take people seriously?; 8: Rawls, Nozick & Walzer/ 8: Distributive Justice; IV: Challenges to Universalism and Foundationalism; 9. The Internationalisation of Political Thought/ 9. Universal Principles in a Society of States; 10. Burke and Oakeshott/ 10. Conservatism: Reason vs Tradition; 11: Feminism and Antifoundationalism/ 11: What's Wrong with Universal Justice?/; Afterword/ Current Engagements in Political Thought; Index.

    • History
      August 2016

      The Almoravid and Almohad Empires

      by Amira K. Bennison

      A comprehensive account of two of the most important empires in medieval North Africa. ; List of Figures; List of Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Note on Transliteration; Chapter 1. Introduction; Chapter 2. The Almoravids: Striving in the path of God; Chapter 3. The Almohads: Revelation, revolution and empire; Chapter 4. Society in the Almoravid and Almohad eras, 1050-1250; Chapter 5. Economy and trade within and beyond imperial frontiers, 1050-1250; Chapter 6. Malikism, Mahdism and Mysticism: Religion and learning, 1050-1250; Chapter 7. ‘The most wondrous artifice’: Art and Architecture of the Berber empires; Chapter 8. Conclusion; Chronological Outline; List of Place Names in Latin and Arabic forms; Glossary of Arabic terms; Bibliography; Index.

    • History
      April 2016

      Astronomy and Astrology in the Islamic World

      by Stephen P. Blake

      It was the astronomers and mathematicians of the Islamic world who provided the theories and concepts that paved the way from the geocentric theories of Claudius Ptolemy in the second century AD to the heliocentric breakthroughs of Nicholas Copernicus and Johannes Kepler in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Algebra, the Arabic numeral system, and trigonometry: all these and more originated in the Muslim East and undergirded an increasingly accurate and sophisticated understanding of the movements of the Sun, Moon, and planets. This nontechnical overview of the Islamic advances in the heavenly sciences allows the general reader to appreciate (for the first time) the absolutely crucial role that Muslim scientists played in the overall development of astronomy and astrology in the Eurasian world. ; This textbook surveys the major advances in the heavenly sciences from Isfahan, Maragha and Samarqand. It looks at the development of astronomy and astrology in the Islamic world from the 9th to the 17th century, and their influence on the beliefs and practices of individuals and institutions in the Islamic world and Europe. ; List of Colour PLates; Preface; Chapter One: From Egypt to Islam; Chapter Two: Muhammad to the Seljuqs; Chapter Three: Observatory at Isfahan; Chapter Four: Astronomy and Astrology in Al-Andalus; Chapter Five: Observatory at Maragha; Chapter Six: Observatory at Samarqand; Chapter Seven: Observatory at Istanbul; Chapter Eight: Observatory at Shahjahanabad; Chapter Nine: Conclusion; Glossary; Select Bibliography; Index.

    • Political control & freedoms
      November 2014

      Foucault and Politics

      A Critical Introduction

      by Mark G. E. Kelly

      This book surveys Michel Foucault’s thought in the context of his life and times, utilising the latest primary and secondary materials to explain the political implications of each phase of his work and the relationships between each phase. It also illustrates how his thought has been used in the political sphere and examines the importance of his work for politics today. ; Critically explains Michel Foucault’s thought: the political implications of each phase of his work, how his thought has been used in the political sphere and the importance of his work for politics today. Table of Contents: Introduction; 1 In the Wake of Marx; 2 Madness and Psychology; 3 Words and Things; 4 Genealogy and Discipline; 5 Power and Resistance; 6 Sex and Life; 7 Government and Governmentality; 8 Self and Ethics; References; Index

    • Political control & freedoms
      November 2014

      Foucault and Politics

      A Critical Introduction

      by Mark G. E. Kelly

      This book surveys Michel Foucault’s thought in the context of his life and times, utilising the latest primary and secondary materials to explain the political implications of each phase of his work and the relationships between each phase. It also illustrates how his thought has been used in the political sphere and examines the importance of his work for politics today. ; Critically explains Michel Foucault’s thought: the political implications of each phase of his work, how his thought has been used in the political sphere and the importance of his work for politics today. Table of Contents: Introduction; 1 In the Wake of Marx; 2 Madness and Psychology; 3 Words and Things; 4 Genealogy and Discipline; 5 Power and Resistance; 6 Sex and Life; 7 Government and Governmentality; 8 Self and Ethics; References; Index

    • Political control & freedoms
      November 2014

      Foucault and Politics

      A Critical Introduction

      by Mark G. E. Kelly

      This book surveys Michel Foucault’s thought in the context of his life and times, utilising the latest primary and secondary materials to explain the political implications of each phase of his work and the relationships between each phase. It also illustrates how his thought has been used in the political sphere and examines the importance of his work for politics today. ; Critically explains Michel Foucault’s thought: the political implications of each phase of his work, how his thought has been used in the political sphere and the importance of his work for politics today. Table of Contents: Introduction; 1 In the Wake of Marx; 2 Madness and Psychology; 3 Words and Things; 4 Genealogy and Discipline; 5 Power and Resistance; 6 Sex and Life; 7 Government and Governmentality; 8 Self and Ethics; References; Index

    • Political control & freedoms
      November 2014

      Foucault and Politics

      A Critical Introduction

      by Mark G. E. Kelly

      This book surveys Michel Foucault’s thought in the context of his life and times, utilising the latest primary and secondary materials to explain the political implications of each phase of his work and the relationships between each phase. It also illustrates how his thought has been used in the political sphere and examines the importance of his work for politics today. ; Critically explains Michel Foucault’s thought: the political implications of each phase of his work, how his thought has been used in the political sphere and the importance of his work for politics today. Table of Contents: Introduction; 1 In the Wake of Marx; 2 Madness and Psychology; 3 Words and Things; 4 Genealogy and Discipline; 5 Power and Resistance; 6 Sex and Life; 7 Government and Governmentality; 8 Self and Ethics; References; Index

    • History
      March 2013

      The Written Word in the Medieval Arabic Lands

      A Social and Cultural History of Reading Practices

      by Konrad Hirschler

      Winner of the 2012 BRISMES book prize. Medieval Islamic societies belonged to the most bookish cultures of their period. Using a wide variety of documentary, narrative and normative sources, Konrad Hirschler explores the growth of reading audiences in

    • Islam
      January 2017

      A History of Islam in Indonesia

      Unity in Diversity

      by Carool Kersten

      Located on the eastern periphery of the historical Muslim world, as a political entity Indonesia is barely a century old. Yet with close to a quarter of a billion followers of Islam it is now the largest and most populous Muslim country in the world. As the greatest political power in Southeast Asia, and a growing player on the world scene, Indonesia presents itself as a bridge country between Asia, the wider Muslim world and the West. In this survey Carool Kersten presents the Islamisation of Indonesia from the first evidence of the acceptance of Islam by indigenous peoples in the late thirteenth century until the present day. He provides comprehensive insight into the different roles played by Islam in Indonesia throughout history, including the importance of Indian Ocean networks for connecting Indonesians with the wider Islamic world, the religion’s role as a means of resistance and tool for nation building, and postcolonial attempts to forge an ‘Indonesian Islam’. ; In this survey Carool Kersten presents the Islamisation of Indonesia from the first evidence of the acceptance of Islam by indigenous peoples in the late thirteenth century until the present day. ; Acknowledgements; A note on translation and transliteration; Glossary; Introduction; 1. The Arrival of Islam; 2. Network Islam; 3. Islam as Resistance; 4. Islam and Nation-building; 5. An Indonesian Islam?; Conclusion; Endnotes; Bibliography; Index. ; Acknowledgements A note on translation and transliteration Glossary Introduction 1. The arrival of Islam 2. Network Islam 3. Islam as resistance 4. Islam and nation-building 5. An Indonesian Islam? Conclusion Endnotes Bibliography Index

    • History
      February 2015

      Reforging a Forgotten History

      Iraq and the Assyrians in the Twentieth Century

      by Sargon Donabed

      Who are the Assyrians and what role did they play in shaping modern Iraq? Were they simply bystanders, victims of collateral damage who played a passive role in the history of Iraq? And how have they negotiated their position throughout various periods of Iraq's state-building processes? This book details the narrative and history of Iraq in the 20th century and reinserts the Assyrian experience as an integral part of Iraq's broader contemporary historiography. It is the first comprehensive account to contextualize this native people's experience alongside the developmental processes of the modern Iraqi state. Using primary and secondary data, this book offers a nuanced exploration of the dynamics that have affected and determined the trajectory of the Assyrians' experience in 20th century Iraq. ; Traces the dynamic history of Iraq in the 20th century and reinserts the modern remnants of these peoples into its day-to-day concerns. ; Table of Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; The Assyrians; A New Approach to Meaning; Moving Forward with Purpose; Chapter Analysis; 1. Integrating the Assyrian Question; A Historiography of Historiography and a Theoretical Framework; Key Sources: Mapping Iraqi Assyrians and Sectarianisation; 2. Framing the Assyrian Narrative: Late 19th and Early 20th Century; Assyrian Demography: Between Deteriorating Empires and Colonial Expansion; Modern Roots of Inter-Religious Animosity; World War 1; From Versailles 1919 to Lausanne 1923; The Period of the Iraq Levies and the Assyrian Settlement; 3. Iraq: Buildin a 'Nation'-State; The Patriarch and Temporal Authority; The Massacre at Simele; International Recognition; Road to the Republic; 4. The Birth of the Republic and an Autonomist Struggle; The 1958 Coup and Renewed Internal Strife; Ṣoriya Massacre of 1969; Demographic Situation; 5. Enduring Discord: Political Machinations and Border Clearings; A Resumption of Violence; The Border Clearings of 1977 -- 1978; 6. New Movements and War on the Horizon; Iraq-Iran War; The Calm Before the Storm; Renewed International Interest in Iraq: The Anfal Campaign; 7. Nation-State Formation, Nation-State Building and Contentious Pluralism; Situating the Assyrian Experience; Agency, Failed Strategies and Transdenominationalism; Simele Revisited; Development and Further Consequences of Urbanisation and Arabisation; State-Sponsored Acculturation; Conclusion; Glossary; Appendix A: Village Data; Appendix B: Bibliography; Appendix C: Documents Concerning Cultural and Political Organisations.

    • International relations
      January 2017

      Strategy in War and Peace

      A Critical Introduction

      by Aaron Edwards

      Discover how strategic theory can be used to navigate the complex and uncertain international security environment that we live in today. Strategy is a central concept in international security, and one that travels across the academic disciplines of politics, international relations and history. By why is it so important? Aaron Edwards unpacks key strategic episodes from world history and politics to help you understand the role of strategy and the scholarly and policy debates surrounding it. Themes covered include: International relations • technology • ethics • irregular war (including counter-insurgency, counter-terrorism and hybrid warfare) • the resurgence of great power rivalries in the early 21st century • the rise of non-state actors Case studies include: Guerrilla warfare and strategy in regions from South East Asia to the Middle East • US nuclear strategy in the Cold War • Russian intervention in Ukraine • British strategy at the end of empire • the UN's role in resolving conflict after the Cold War • US-led coalition strategy in Afghanistan • the challenge posed by Al Qaeda and Islamic State/Daesh ; Aaron Edwards unpacks key strategic episodes from world history and politics to help you understand the role of strategy and the scholarly and policy debates surrounding it: from counter-insurgency to the rise of non-state actors, and from the end of the British empire to Daesh/Islamic State. ; Preface; Acknowledgements; Contents; Introduction; 1. What is Strategy?; 2. Ends and Means in Strategy; 3. The Practical Application of Strategy; 4. Strategy, Ethics and Restraint in War; 5. Strategy and the Utility of Force; 6. The Role of Strategy in Ending Wars and Building Peace; 7. Strategy Redux?; Conclusion; Notes; Glossary; Bibliography. ; PrefaceAcknowledgementsIntroduction What is Strategy? Ends and Means in Strategy The Practical Application of Strategy Strategy, Ethics and Restraint in War Strategy and the Utility of Force The Role of Strategy in Ending Wars and Building Peace Strategy Redux? ConclusionNotesGlossaryBibliography

    • History of other lands
      April 2014

      Courts and Elites in the Hellenistic Empires

      The Near East After the Achaemenids, c. 330 to 30 BCE

      by Rolf Strootman

      Rolf Strootman brings together various aspects of court culture in the Macedonian empires of the post-Achaemenid Near East. During the Hellenistic Period (c. 330-30 BCE), Alexander the Great and his successors reshaped their Persian and Greco-Macedonian legacies to create a new kind of rulership that was neither ‘western’ nor ‘eastern’ and would profoundly influence the later development of court culture and monarchy in both the Roman West and Iranian East. Drawing on the socio-political models of Norbert Elias and Charles Tilly, After the Achaemenids shows how the Hellenistic dynastic courts were instrumental in the integration of local elites in the empires, and the (re)distribution of power, wealth, and status. It analyses the competition among courtiers for royal favour and the, not always successful, attempts of the Hellenistic rulers to use these struggles to their own advantage. It demonstrates the interrelationships of the three competing ‘Hellenistic’ empires of the Seleukids, Antigonids and Ptolemies, casts new light on the phenomenon of Hellenistic Kingship by approaching it from the angle of the court and covers topics such as palace architecture, royal women, court ceremonial, and coronation ritual. ; Rolf Strootman brings together various aspects of court culture in the Macedonian empires of the post-Achaemenid Near East. ; Acknowledgments; List of Illustrations; Abbreviations; Introduction: Court and empire in the Hellenistic Near East; PART I: SETTING THE STAGE; 1. The court as an instrument of power; 2. The theater of royalty; 3. The royal palace: A stage for royal rituals; PART II: THE COURT AS A SOCIO-POLITICAL SYSTEM; 4. The royal household; 5. Court society; 6. Royal pages; 7. Social dynamics; 8. Hierarchy and conflict; PART III: CEREMONIAL AND RITUAL; 9. Ceremonial and protocol; 10. Death and resurrection: Inauguration ritual; 11. The royal entry; 12. Royal processions: Enacting the myth of empire; Conclusion; Bibliography; The Macedonian dynasties.

    • Philosophy: metaphysics & ontology
      May 2015

      Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus

      A Critical Introduction and Guide

      by Brent Adkins

      The sheer volume and complexity of Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus can be daunting. What is an assemblage? What is a rhizome? What is a war machine? What is a body without organs? What is becoming-animal? Using clear language and numerous examples, each chapter of this guide analyses an individual plateau and examines the tendencies toward both stasis and change for each assemblage found there – be it social, political, psychological, musical, biological or linguistic. ; Using clear language and numerous examples, each chapter of this guide analyses an individual plateau from Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus, interpreting the work for students and scholars. ; Acknowledgments; Introduction: A Perceptual Semiotics; 1. Rhizome; 2. 1914: One or Several Wolves?; 3. 10,000 B.C.: The Geology of Morals; 4. November 20, 1923: Postulates of Linguistics; 5. 587 B.C. – A.D. 70: On Several Regimes of Signs; 6. November 28, 1947: How Do You Make Yourself a Body Without Organs?; 7. Year Zero: Faciality; 8. 1874: Three Novellas, or ‘What Happened?’; 9. 1933: Micropolitics and Segmentarity; 10. 1730: Becoming-Intense, Becoming-Animal, Becoming-Imperceptible…; 11. 1837: Of the Refrain; 12. 1227: Treatise on Nomadology – The War Machine; 13. 7000 B.C.: Apparatus of Capture; 14. 1440: The Smooth and the Striated; Conclusion: The Ethics of Becoming; Suggestions for Further Reading; Bibliography.

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