• Development studies
      June 2016

      Slumming It

      The Tourist Valorisation of Urban Poverty

      by Fabian Frenzel

      Have slums become 'cool'? More and more tourists from across the globe seem to think so as they discover favelas, ghettos, townships and barrios on leisurely visits. But while slum tourism often evokes moral outrage, critics rarely ask about what motivates this tourism, or what wider consequences and effects it initiates. In this provocative book, Fabian Frenzel investigates the lure that slums exert on their better-off visitors, looking at the many ways in which this curious form of attraction ignites changes both in the slums themselves and on the world stage. Covering slums ranging from Rio de Janeiro to Bangkok, and multiple cities in South Africa, Kenya and India, Slumming It examines the roots and consequences of a growing phenomenon whose effects have ranged from gentrification and urban policy reform to the organization of international development and poverty alleviation. Controversially, Frenzel argues that the rise of slum tourism has drawn attention to important global justice issues, and is far more complex than we initially acknowledged.

    • Economics
      June 2015

      Change Everything

      Creating an Economy for the Common Good

      by Christian Felber

      Is it possible to imagine businesses whose bottom line is not profit and endless growth, but human dignity, justice, democracy and sustainability? Or an alternative economic model untainted by the greed and breakdown of current financial systems? Christian Felber says it is. Moreover, in Change Everything he shows how we might go about making it a reality. The Economy for the Common Good (ECG) is not just an idea, but has already become a broad international movement with thousands of people, hundreds of companies, dozens of communities and organizations participating, co-developing and implementing the idea. Published in English for the first time, this is a remarkable manifesto for change that will profoundly influence debates on re-shaping our economies in the wake of failed attempts at austerity.

    • Development studies
      January 2014

      Reclaiming Development

      An Alternative Economic Policy Manual

      by Ha-Joon Chang and Ilene Grabel

      There is no alternative to neoliberal economics - or so it appeared when Reclaiming Development was published in 2004. Many of the same driving assumptions - monetarism and globalization - remain within the international development policy establishment. Ha-Joon Chang and Ilene Grabel confront this neoliberal development model head-on by combining devastating economic critique with an array of innovative policies and an in-depth analysis of the experiences of leading Western and East Asian economies. Still, much has changed since 2004 - the relative success of some developing countries in weathering the global financial crisis has exposed the latent contradictions of the neoliberal model. The resulting situation of increasingly open policy innovation in the global South means that Reclaiming Development is even more relevant today than when it was first published. History is being made.

    • Development studies
      January 2015

      South Sudan: A Slow Liberation

      by Edward Thomas

      In 2011, South Sudan became an independent country. Its long liberation struggle was an attempt to right the wrongs of brutal colonial conquest, deliberate neglect and racial oppression organized by governments headquartered at Khartoum. The long struggle has had a violent aftermath. The war of liberation has been marked by looting, raids and massacres that pitted ethnic communities against each other. In this remarkably comprehensive work, Edward Thomas provides a multi-layered examination of what is happening in the country today. Writing from the perspective of South Sudan's most mutinous hinterland, Jonglei state, the book explains how this area was at the heart of South Sudan's liberation. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and a broad range of sources, this book gives a sharply focused, fresh account of South Sudan's long, unfinished struggle for liberation.

    • Development studies
      February 2015

      Clothing Poverty

      The Hidden World of Fast Fashion and Second-hand Clothes

      by Andrew Brooks

      Have you ever stopped and wondered where your jeans came from? Who made them and where? Ever wondered where they end up after you donate them for recycling? Following a pair of jeans, Clothing Poverty takes the reader on a vivid around-the-world tour to reveal how clothes are manufactured and retailed, bringing to light how fast-fashion and clothing recycling are interconnected. Andrew Brooks shows how recycled clothes are traded across continents, uncovers how retailers and international charities are embroiled in commodity chains which perpetuate poverty, and exposes the hidden trade networks which transect the globe. Stitching together rich narratives, from Mozambican markets, Nigerian smugglers and Bolivian female traders to London's vintage clothing scene and Vivienne Westwood's ethical fashion lines, Brooks uncovers the many hidden sides of fashion.

    • Development studies
      March 2015

      Spaces of Aid

      How Cars, Compounds and Hotels Shape Humanitarianism

      by Lisa Smirl

      Aid workers commonly bemoan that the spaces and experiences of working in 'the field' often sit uneasily with the goals they've signed up to: from visiting project sites in air-conditioned Land Cruisers while the intended beneficiaries walk barefoot through the heat, to checking emails from within gated compounds while surrounding communities have no running water. While such observations might seem intuitive, to date no concerted academic or policy study has dealt with the impact of these factors on theory or policy. Spaces of Aid provides the first book-length analysis of what has colloquially been referred to as Aid Land, exploring in depth two high-profile case studies - the Aceh tsunami and Hurricane Katrina - in order to uncover a fascinating history of the material objects that have become an endemic, expected, yet unexamined part of the aid landscape.

    • Management of land & natural resources
      April 2014

      Breathing Space

      The Natural and Unnatural History of Air

      by Mark Everard

      In this book Mark Everard argues that governments and citizens too often take the air we breathe for granted. Air and the wider atmosphere are vital in protecting us from radiation, maintaining climate and weather patterns, dispersing water, seeds and pollen, and serving as an alternative source of energy. Breathing Space overturns conventional thinking on the atmosphere, and is the first book to properly integrate air into the wider environmental discourse. Outlining the structure and development of the atmosphere, Everard assesses its importance within the environment as a whole. Everard’s work represents the long overdue incorporation of air into our wider understanding of ecosystems, and argues persuasively for the need for governments to recognise the importance of air as a resource. A must read for scholars, students and activists.

    • Political economy
      February 2014

      Capitalism in the Age of Globalization

      The Management of Contemporary Society

      by Samir Amin

      Samir Amin remains one of the world's most influential thinkers about the changing nature of North-South relations in the development of contemporary capitalism. In this highly prescient book, originally published in 1997, he provides a powerful analysis of the new unilateral capitalist era following the collapse of the Soviet model, and the apparent triumph of the market and globalization. Amin's innovative analysis charts the rise of ethnicity and fundamentalism as consequences of the failure of ruling classes in the South to counter the exploitative terms of globalization. This has had profound implications and continues to resonate today. Furthermore, his deconstruction of the Bretton Woods institutions as managerial mechanisms which protect the profitability of capital provides an important insight into the continued difficulties in reforming them. Amin's rejection of the apparent inevitability of globalization in its present polarising form is particularly prophetic - instead he asserts the need for each society to negotiate the terms of its inter-dependence with the rest of the global economy. A landmark work by a key contemporary thinker.

    • Political economy
      January 2014

      How Numbers Rule the World

      The Use and Abuse of Statistics in Global Politics

      by Lorenzo Fioramonti

      Numbers dominate global politics and, as a result, our everyday lives. Credit ratings steer financial markets and can make or break the future of entire nations. GDP drives our economies. Stock market indices flood our media and national debates. Statistical calculations define how we deal with climate change, poverty and sustainability. But what is behind these numbers? In How Numbers Rule the World, Lorenzo Fioramonti reveals the hidden agendas underpinning the use of statistics and those who control them. Most worryingly, he shows how numbers have been used as a means to reinforce the grip of markets on our social and political life, curtailing public participation and rational debate. An innovative and timely exposé of the politics, power and contestation of numbers.

    • Development studies
      December 2015

      Beyond Colonialism, Development and Globalization

      Social Movements and Critical Perspectives

      by Dominique Caouette, Dip Kapoor

      Development studies is in a state of flux. A new generation of scholars has come to reject what was once regarded as accepted wisdom, and increasingly regard development and globalization as part of a continuum with colonialism, premised on the same reductionist assumption that progress and growth are objective facts that can be fostered, measured, assessed and controlled. Drawing on a variety of theoretical perspectives and approaches, this book explores the ways in which social movements in the Global South are rejecting Western-centric notions of development and modernization, as well as creating their own alternatives. By assessing development theories from the perspective of subaltern groups and movements, the contributors posit a new notion of development ‘from below’, one in which these movements provide new ways of imagining social transformation, and a way out of the ‘developmental dead end’ that has so far characterized post-development approaches. Beyond Colonialism, Development and Globalization therefore represents a radical break with the prevailing narrative of modernization, and points to a bold new direction for development studies.

    • Development studies
      September 2015

      Water and Development

      Good Governance after Neoliberalism

      by Ronaldo Munck

      Water has always been a crucial catalyst for human development. In Africa, competition among different sectors for this scarce resource remains a critical challenge to water managers and decision-makers. Water and Development examines a range of issues, from governance to solar distillation, from gender to water pumps, using a range of research methods, from participant observation to GIS and SPSS data analysis. Throughout, however, there is the unifying thread of developing a participatory and sustainable approach to water which recognises it as an essential public necessity. The result is essential reading both for students of development and the environment and for NGOs and policy-makers seeking a robust and transformational approach to water and development.

    • Development studies
      December 2015

      Protecting the Health of the Poor

      Social Movements in the South

      by Abraar Karan, Geeta Sodhi

      Nowhere is the injustice of the global distribution of income and wealth more palpable than in health. While the world’s affluent spend fortunes on the most trifling treatments, poor people’s lives are ruined and often cut short prematurely by challenges that could easily be overcome at low cost: childbirth, diarrhoea, malnutrition, malaria, HIV/AIDS, measles, pneumonia. Millions are avoidably dying from such causes each year and billions of lives avoidably blighted by these diseases of poverty. Drawing on in-depth empirical research spanning Asia, Latin America, and Africa, this path-breaking collection offers fresh perspectives from critically engaged scholars. Protecting the Health of the Poor presents a call and a vision for unified efforts across geographies, levels and sectors to make the right to health truly universal.

    • Development studies
      March 2015

      Planet Dialectics

      Explorations in Environment and Development

      by Wolfgang Sachs

      All effects of human action will inevitably be played out within our planet’s limits; any hope of infinity is an illusion. And yet, as Wolfgang Sachs warned almost twenty years ago, environmental concerns have been assimilated into the rhetoric, dynamics and power structures of development. This classic collection of trenchant and elegant explorationsaddresses the crisis of the Western world’s relations with nature and social justice. Examining the notions of efficiency, speed, globalization and development, Sachs shows that sustainability, truly conceived, is incompatible with the worldwide rule of economism. Planet Dialectics reveals that the Western development model is fundamentally at odds with both the quest for justice among the world’s people and the aspiration to reconcile humanity and nature.

    • Development studies
      February 2015

      Asia-Africa Development Divergence

      A Question of Intent

      by David Henley

      Why have South-East Asian countries like Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam been so successful in reducing levels of absolute poverty, while in African countries like Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania, despite recent economic growth, most people are still almost as poor as they were half a century ago? This book presents a simple, radical explanation for the great divergence in development performance between Asia and Africa: the absence in most parts of Africa, and the presence in Asia, of serious developmental intent on the part of national political leaders.

    • Development studies
      September 2014

      Land and Freedom

      The MST, the Zapatistas and Peasant Alternatives to Neoliberalism

      by Leandro Vergara-Camus

      The Zapatistas of Chiapas and the Landless Rural Workers' Movement (MST) of Brazil are often celebrated as shining examples in the global struggle against neoliberalism. But what have these movements achieved for their members in more than two decades of resistance and can any of these achievements realistically contribute to the rise of a viable alternative? Through a perfect balance of grassroots testimonies, participative observation and consideration of key debates in development studies, agrarian political economy, historical sociology and critical political economy, Land and Freedom compares, for the first time, the Zapatista and MST movements. Casting a spotlight on their resistance to globalizing market forces, Vergara-Camus gets to the heart of how these movements organize themselves and how territorial control, politicization and empowerment of their membership and the decommodification of social relations are key to understanding their radical development potential.

    • Development studies
      November 2015

      Workers, state and development in Brazil

      Powers of labour, chains of value

      by Ben Selwyn

      How do changing class relations contribute to processes of capitalist development? Within development studies the importance of class relations is usually relegated to lesser status than the roles of states and markets in generating and allocating resources. This book argues that the changing class relations are central to different patterns of capitalist development and that processes and outcomes of class struggle co-determine the form that development takes. Workers, state and development in Brazil illuminates these claims through a detailed empirical investigation of class dynamics and capitalist development in North East Brazil's São Francisco valley. It details how workers in the valley's export grape sector have won significant concessions from employers, contributing to a progressive pattern of regional capitalist development. The book will appeal to students and researchers interested in processes of capitalist development, agrarian political economy and international political economy.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      February 2012

      Workers, state and development in Brazil

      Powers of labour, chains of value

      by Benjamin Selwyn

      How do changing class relations contribute to processes of capitalist development? Within development studies the importance of class relations is usually relegated to lesser status than the roles of states and markets in generating and allocating resources. This book argues that the changing class relations are central to different patterns of capitalist development and that processes and outcomes of class struggle co-determine the form that development takes. Workers, State and Development in Brazil, nominated for the International Political Economy Group (IPGG) Book Prize 2013 and now available in paperback, illuminates these claims through a detailed empirical investigation of class dynamics and capitalist development in North East Brazil's São Francisco valley. It details how workers in the valley's export grape sector have won significant concessions from employers, contributing to a progressive pattern of regional capitalist development. The book will appeal to students and researchers interested in processes of capitalist development, agrarian political economy and international political economy. ;

    • Development studies
      March 2012

      Agricultural Policies for Poverty Reduction

      by Jonathan Brooks

      This study addresses the role of agricultural policies in raising incomes in developing countries. Higher incomes are essential for sustained progress on the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG1), which calls for the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, and includes a specific target of reducing by 50% between 1990 and 2015 the proportion of people living on less than a dollar a day. The aim is to identify ways in which the appropriate set of policies may vary according to a country's stage of development. A synthesis volume will also be published for policy makers. With more than two-thirds of the world's poor living in rural areas, higher rural incomes are needed to sustain poverty reduction and reduce hunger. This volume sets out a strategy for raising rural incomes which emphasises the need to create diversified rural economies with opportunities within and outside agriculture. This means adopting policies that facilitate rather than impede structural change and integrate agricultural policies within the overall mix of policies and institutional reforms that are needed. By investing in public goods, such as infrastructure and agricultural research, and by building effective social safety nets, governments can reduce the pressures related to less efficient policies such as price controls and input subsidies.

    • Development studies
      November 2011

      Restoring Community Connections to the Land

      Building Resilience through Community-based Rangeland Management in China and Mongolia

      by Edited by María E Fernández-Giménez, Xiaoyi Wang, Batkhishig Baival, Julia Klein, Robin Reid

      The rangelands of China and Mongolia encompass diverse landscapes of global environmental and cultural significance. Pastoralists in these two nations share much common history and tradition, including their nomadic heritage and twin eras of collectivized production under different centrally planned socialist regimes. This unique collection of case studies describes the change, loss, re-emergence and resilience of seven herder communities located in distinct socio-ecological settings ranging from the Gobi desert of Mongolia to the Tibetan Plateau regions of China's Sichuan and Gansu Provinces. Useful for policy makers within international development and conservation policy, this book is also of interest for researchers and students of rural economics and agriculture.

    • Development studies
      June 2012

      Children, Citizenship, and Environment

      Nurturing a Democratic Imagination in a Changing World

      by Bronwyn Hayward

      Children growing up today are confronted by four difficult and intersecting challenges: dangerous environmental change, weakening democracies, growing social inequality, and a global economy marked by unprecedented youth unemployment and unsustainable resource extraction. Yet on streets everywhere, there is also a strong, youthful energy for change.This book sets out an inspiring new agenda for citizenship and environmental education which reflects the responsibility and opportunities facing educators, researchers, parents and community groups to support young citizens as they learn to 'make a difference' on the issues that concern them.Controversial yet ultimately hopeful, political scientist Bronwyn Hayward rethinks assumptions about youth citizenship in neoliberal democracies. Her comparative discussion draws on lessons from New Zealand, a country where young citizens often express a strong sense of personal responsibility for their planet but where many children also face shocking social conditions. Hayward develops a 'SEEDS' model of ecological citizenship education (Social agency, Environmental Education, Embedded justice, Decentred deliberative democracy and Self transcendence). The discussion considers how the SEEDs model can support young citizens' democratic imagination and develop their 'handprint' for social justice.From eco-worriers and citizen-scientists to streetwise sceptics, Children, Citizenship and Environment identifies a variety of forms of citizenship and discusses why many approaches make it more difficult, not easier, for young citizens to effect change. This book will be of interest to a wide audience, in particular teachers of children aged eight to twelve and professionals who work in Environmental Citizenship Education as well as students and researchers with an interest in environmental change, democracy and intergenerational justice.Introduced by international sustainability expert Tim Jackson, the book includes forewords by leading European and USA academics, Andrew Dobson and Roger Hart.Half the author's royalties will be donated to child poverty projects following the earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand.Follow Bronwyn Hayward's blog at: http://growing-greens.blogspot.co.nz/

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