• Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)
      March 2006

      Marisa

      by Peter Cowlam

      The book’s central time frame is the 1970s, when Bruce takes over a financial consultancy firm founded by his father, and Marisa inherits property. Love, lust and money are what drive them both, until their relationship meets its first challenge. Bruce retreats further into the world of commerce. Marisa’s interests are social and political. Twenty-five years on from their affair, a chance entry in one of Bruce’s business listings shows that Marisa is now boss of the Rae Agency – a media PR concern. Bruce, as he recollects their tumultuous relationship, is torn between his harmonious family life, and renewing contact with Marisa. Finally, when he does decide on a course of action, he has to face the truth of not having grasped the cultural separation their two different views of the world have wrought over the last quarter century.

    • Literary Fiction
      January 2012

      Best Paris Stories

      Anthology of the winners of the Paris Short Story Contest

      by Marie Houzelle

      For some, Paris is home, for others, merely a dream. By turns humorous, bittersweet, historical or surreal, each of these carefully selected stories invites us to explore a different facet of Paris. BEST PARIS STORIES brings together the winning short stories of the 2011 Paris Short Story Contest with works by Jeannine Alter, Bob Levy, Lisa Burkitt, Nafkote Tamirat, Marie Houzelle, Jo Nguyen, Julia Mary Lichtblau, Mary Byrne, Marie Houzelle, Jane M. Handel, and Jim Archibald. "Exciting new voices from the winners of the 2011 Paris Short Story Contest" - Paris Writers News

    • Fiction
      January 2011

      True Warriors

      by Ken Kamoche

      Life under dictatorship, Moi, Nairobi, Kenya, London, Britain, political witch-hunting, poaching, ivory trade, financial scandals, studying abroad, interracial relationships, love triangle, land conflicts, Mau mau, freedom fighters, postcolonial Kenya, corruption, searching for identity, finding oneself.

    • Fiction
      January 2012

      Skimmin' Stones

      by Nicholas P. Murray

      A multilayered book that shocks, saddens, invigorates, and definitely entertains. Irish literature. Coming-of-age. Adolescent adventure. Teacher-student relations. First kiss. Dublin. London. Dysfunctional family. Love triangle. Pope. Most wanted man.

    • Fiction
      January 2013

      Black Ghosts

      by Ken Kamoche

      Dan Chiponda earns a scholarship to study in China and reluctantly leaves his native Zimbabwe for an uncertain future. Learning to take racial abuse in his stride, he dates a fellow student, Lai Ying, who is attracted to his easygoing manner. He remains haunted by the weight of his mother’s expectations, encapsulated by the image of the African fish eagle. Things take a dramatic turn when Chinese students pour into the streets in an orgy of violence to drive Africans out of town. The situation in Nanjing only stabilises when attention turns to the mayhem that is unraveling in Tiananmen Square, Beijing. But that is only the beginning of Dan’s troubles with the ‘Campus Gestapo’, loan sharks in Hong Kong, and the shock of his family getting caught up in the violence by Mugabe’s war vets.

    • Fiction
      September 2017

      Invisible Scars

      by Peter Sykes

      Whilst Paul and Kate work alongside each other as doctor and nurse on the surgical ward, strains in their relationship emerge. And when Kate's baby dies and Paul's inexperience costs lives, doubt and despair hang in the air and their marriage appears to be doomed. However, in a dramatic turn of events, Paul saves the life of a critically ill patient and Kate is finally able to bid an emotional farewell to the child she has lost. Will their marriage survive the stresses of their hospital work and their past traumas?

    • Literary Fiction
      October 2015

      The Secret Mother

      by Delderfield, Victoria

      Mai Ling is chasing the Chinese dream. She’s escaping to the city, seeking a new life, running away from the old customs of arranged marriage and domestic drudgery. The Secret Mother puts a face to the label Made in China. It tells the bittersweet story of a girl – like millions of others – willing to risk everything.

    • Fiction
      January 2016

      Bonds of Love and Blood

      by Marylee Macdonald

      Whether far from home or longing to escape, the people in these stories find themselves displaced from their normal routines. They misread the signals and wind up stranded on lonely beaches or seizing the moment before happiness flits away. "MacDonald applies insight, power, and delicacy to create characters between whom the psychic space virtually sizzles." —FOREWORD REVIEWS "engrossing"—MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW "With elegant prose enlivened by shards of mean humor, MacDonald captures how hard it is to love and/or trust abroad or at home."—KIRKUS REVIEWS "Author Marylee MacDonald has done an absolutely masterful job of presenting her readers with short stories so beautifully written that the characters will stay in your mind long after the story, and indeed the book, is done."—READERS’ FAVORITE "In her collection of twelve brilliantly-written short stories, MacDonald explores the pain and beauty of human relationships. MacDonald’s writing is raw and visceral, creating a strong emotional connection between her characters and the reader."—US REVIEW OF BOOKS "Bonds of Love and Blood is brilliantly written and nothing less than emotive."—HOLLYWOOD BOOK REVIEWS "Poignant, honest,and compelling... Highly recommended."—PACIFIC BOOK REVIEW "MacDonald dares to question which is the greater, more unsettling risk: the alluring intimacy of foreign terrains, or the intimate dangers of domesticity?" —Tara Ison, author of Reeling Through Life and Child out of Alcatraz "Her characters remind us of our universal and contradictory longing for solitude and for connection. Savor this book. Enjoy being in the hands of a generous and visionary writer." —Eileen Favorite, author of The Heroines "These elegantly crafted stories brim with emotional wisdom and eloquence. Bearing you around the world, they will imprint themselves, deeply, indelibly, upon your heart." —Melissa Pritchard, author of Palmerino

    • Fiction
      July 2016

      New King Palmers

      by Peter Cowlam

      Winner of the 2018 Quagga Prize for Literary Fiction. Set in the late 1990s, in the months up to and after the death of Princess Diana, New King Palmers is narrated by its principal character Humfrey Joel, a close friend of Earl Eliot d’Oc. The earl’s ancestry is bound up with the Habsburgs and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. D’Oc is a member of the British Privy Council and a close friend of Prince Charles and Princess Diana. In the months preceding Diana’s death, he commissions a young theatre professional to develop a play. The play’s theme is constitutional issues surrounding Prince Charles, with the heir’s interests served by UK withdrawal from the EU, before it becomes a federal superstate. The commissioned play is called New King Palmers, and d’Oc maintains rigorous editorial control over it. When d’Oc’s death shortly follows Diana’s, Joel is named as d’Oc’s literary executor, with the task of bringing the play to the English stage. Supposedly written into the text is an encoded message from the British Privy Council on behalf of the House of Windsor, addressed to the stewards of the EU. When news of this leaks out no one in the British literary and theatrical worlds believes it. In fact most come to see Earl d’Oc as an invented character behind which Joel shields himself, when his own motives are themselves sinister. So sinister, an MI5 spook is put on the case.

    • Fiction
      May 2015

      Across the Rebel Network

      by Peter Cowlam

      Anno centres a federated Europe in an uncertain, and not-too-distant digital future, when politics, the media and mass communications have fused into one amorphous whole. He works for the Bureau of Data Protection (BDP), a federal government department responsible for monitoring the full range of material, in all media, posted into cyberspace. The BDP is forced to do this when rebel states are seceding, small satellites once of the federation but now at a remove from it, economically and socially. A handful of organised outsiders threatens to undermine the central state through a concerted propaganda war, using the federation’s own digital infrastructure. It is this climate of mutual suspicion that to Anno makes inevitable decades of digital guerrilla warfare. While his department takes steps to prevent this, he doesn’t reckon on the intervention of his old college sparring partner, Craig Diamond, who is now a powerful media mogul. The two engage in combat conducted through cyberspace, in a rare concoction of literary sci-fi.

    • Fiction
      August 2017

      Crossing

      Tiranan sydän

      by Pajtim Statovci

      A powerful and symbolic novel of unattainable love and the wars that never end. In the devastation of post-Communist Albania, life is akin to imprisonment for the inseparable young friends Bujar and Agim. While Bujar struggles to come to terms with the loss of his father, Agim is facing new realizations about his gender, sexuality, and feelings for Bujar. Shame, guilt, and the ruins of Enver Hoxha’s authoritarianism push Bujar and Akim to leave everything behind and flee to Italy. But the unfamiliar new life of an immigrant and asylum seeker caught in a foreign country, language, and even body, begins to seem like nothing more than a dead end. The burning desire to be seen and heard spurs a desperate search for another story, another nationality, another past. A different self to be seized at any cost. Pajtim Statovci’s highly topical second novel immerses the reader in a refugee’s fragile state of mind and the broken reality of millions today. Heartlines is stunningly beautiful, rich both in prose and tone, a powerful and symbolic novel of unattainable love and the wars that never end. But most of all, of the lies that give stories their power. 'Crossing' will be out with Panthenon Books (US) in April and Pushkin Press (UK) in May 2019.

    • Fiction
      2017

      Remorse Test

      by Khalil Sweileh

      Remorse Test is Sweileh’s follow up to his novel Writing Love, which was the 2009 winner of The Mahfouz Medal for Literature. This semi-autobiographical novel, takes readers through the streets of Damascus and offers a first-hand look at life and loss during the Syrian civil war. The protagonist is a brilliant writer who is navigating a new, war-torn reality. While reminiscing about his past, he shows us what everyday life is like in Damascus—at once brutal and boring—and laments the missed opportunities and destruction the conflict has caused in his country. Drawing on his experience as a journalist, poet and novelist, author Khalil Sweileh writes about the psychological conflicts amid the shattered reality of place and society using language that is full of imagery. Remorse Test is an important addition to Syrian literature, both for its subject matter and unique use of narrative tools and vocabulary. (An extended English-language report on this book will be available soon.)

    • Fiction
      2017

      Summer Rains

      Winner of the 2018 Sheikh Zayed Book Award for Young Author

      by Ahmad Al Qarmalawi

      Using music as a thread that connects the past to the present, this novel explores what happens when traditional and cultural heritage clash with modernity. The characters face the impact of modernization on heritage and arts versus the need to protect and preserve their traditional culture and must choose between the pursuit of materialism versus spiritual balance. . Al Qarmalawi writes about a wide range of music from Sufism to the present era of electronic musical arts, and Summer Rains addresses the current Arab youth crisis, in which young people find themselves torn between fundamentalism and modernity. (An extended English-language report on this book will be available soon.)

    • Literary Fiction
      May 2017

      Rueful Revenge

      by C T Karlsson

      When two people accidentally bump into each other, a whole loadof memories come flooding back. Memories that have been carefully hidden away in the depths of one's mind and will now impact everyone's life significantly. A father of two is reported missing to the Falkenberg police, an investigation is initiated and to start with it everything is pointing towards him disappearing voluntarily, i.e. that he has left his wife and child of his own free will. Early one Sunday morning, in what looks like an accident, a deceased man is found by the foot of the lighthouse at Morups Tånge. In a sailing boat in the harbour, the owner of Glommen Marina discover something awful and all of a sudden, ChiefInspector Kajsa Rudolfsson and her colleagues have two tragicdeaths to investigate.Chief Constable Raúl Morales soon he has his hands full andCrown Prosecutor Ylva Isaksson is once again an integral part ofhis daily life. For better or for worse. The staff are also aware thatthe whole police organisation is being restructured, so theatmosphere at the office is somewhat apprehensive. Morales hasquite a few decisions to make about the future and none of themis easy. Rueful revenge is the second part of CT Karlsson's crime trilogycalled Falkenberg murders.

    • Fiction
      June 2017

      Joyous Beauty

      by Sara H Olsson

      In the book Joyous Beauty the reader gets to meet twowomen that both face various challenges in life. Nina has everything she could ever dream of; living in the lap ofluxury in the capital with limitless funds, a husband thatworships her and a hot lover on the side too. Everythingis running along just nicely until one day a stupid slip upturns her whole life upside down. Nina seeks refuge inher home town of Hallavik, where she is forced to movein with her mum and her mum's wife. Life is pretty lousyright now. At least until she meets Johanna; a wild, liberated chef, who likes both herself and her appearance. She is down-to-earth and independent, have a lot of fun with younger guys and will do everything and more toavoid getting new neighbours. Amazing what you can achieve with some dead mice and a thong-clad, wobbly bottoms! Joyous Beauty is a light-hearted, amusing and thrillingromcom about love, emotions, lies, betrayal and sex.

    • Fiction
      November 2017

      December Heat

      by Sara H Olsson

      Christmas is approaching and the easygoing life in Hallavik isabout to enter a new phase for Nina Becker and Johanna Seger. One of them is now voluntarily divorced and happy to put herlife as a married lady of leisure behind her. The other findsherself involuntarily co-habiting and is also told there herworkplace will undergo a reorganisation process. Roles arereversed and the two women try to adapt to their new situation. To celebrate her return to the little town on the west coast ofSweden, Nina decides to throw a glühwein party and a familiar face pops up when she least expects it and Nina doesn't know how to react. He is both pleasant and handsome, but Nina knows all about his secret. Johanna can't seem to let go of her personal issues, which leadsto her celebrating a little bit too much and ends up in an intimate situation with the wrong man. December Heat is a charming and witty novel about life's ups and downs, and the sequel to Joyous Beauty, the first book in the Hallavikseries.

    • Fiction
      January 2018

      Just round the corner

      by Jenny Jacobsson

      Isa, a 35-year old woman, has recently been dumped by her long-term partner. Suddenly she finds herself childless as she gave up her own wishes and dreams about getting pregnant when her partner Jimmy didn’t want any more children. Isa now realises what she has sacrificed, and her ovaries are now screaming to be fertilised. One day she finds a post-it note under the windshield wiper of her car, which makes her feel both flattered and curious. But when the notes slowly turn more and more threatening, panic starts to set in. Meet Tuva-Li, the guardian angel that usually takes the moral high ground, but now happens to commit a mistake with unimaginable consequences. Jarild is a banker that harbours a big secret. Should this be revealed, his whole existence would literally fall apart. And who exactly is Zack, the man Isa picks up on a night out for the sole purpose of satisfying the desperate need of her ovaries?

    • Fiction
      April 2017

      The Secret Next Door

      by Jenny Jacobsson

      A contemporary story about Melissa & Viggo set in a fictitious town in Sweden. The motto of this book is "Surviving is not relevant, living life, however, is." Melissa and Viggo are the couple that most people in the neighbourhood envy. She is a beautiful fashion designer, he is a news anchor and together they have it all. But are things really the way they seem from the outside? Threats and violence are lurking behind the perfectly polished façade. Every evening, when Viggo steps over the threshold into his home, he is effectively treading on eggshells where the slightest of missteps can cause it to break, and Melissa to explode. The secret next door is Jenny Jacobsson's first book and she when she did her researching for this book researching for this book in 2014 she had a conversation with 'Mansjouren' (a help organisation that focuses on men experiencing domestic violence), where she was told that it is as common for women to physically and psychologically abuse men as it is vice versa. There are already numerous books written about men’s violence towards women, so she decided to write this book to show a different perspective.

    • Literary Fiction
      2018

      A Face Like the Moon

      Stories

      by Mina Athanassious

      A remarkable debut from Canadian-Coptic writer, Mina Athanassious, who takes readers into the heartbreaking world of Coptic children coming of age in Egypt. “All Good Things Thrown Away” delves into Egypt’s notorious Garbage City and the lives of Cairo’s garbage collectors. The title story moves to a small remote village in southern Egypt where a ten-year-old boy struggles with a family tragedy. A Face Like the Moon marks a bold and original new voice in Canadian fiction. To learn more about this publisher, click here: http://bit.ly/2lVGQwI

    • Literary Fiction

      A Year in Kronoberg

      by Geoff Bunn

      This is a story about snow. A story about winter and even more snow. But this is also a story about ice cream and sunshine too. This is a story about a gate, helpful neighbours, an angry squirrel and a drunken moose. This is a story about a country in Europe that many people never visit. This is a story about Sweden. And it is the story of two Brits who moved to Sweden and found a new home there. A Year in Kronoberg is a light-hearted account of two people learning to navigate the idiosyncrasies of Swedish culture, landscape and climate.

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