• Mind, Body, Spirit
      June 2015

      Awakening Leadership

      Embracing Mindfulness, Your Life’s Purpose, and the Leader You Were Born to Be

      by Horner, Christine

      Human advancement requires the realization that each one of us has an essential role to fulfill to lead humanity into a new era of true equality and prosperity. In Awakening Leadership, Horner describes how mindfulness connects us to the Unified Field of Creation, opening the door to our infinite potential and our life’s purpose. If Earth’s prime directive is oneness, its universal guiding principle is sustainability. In the New Leadership Blueprint, sustainability becomes the all-inclusive compass that redefines morality, values, the way we care for one another and the planet. Transcending boundaries, Awakening Leadership is an illuminating “human” guide that will inspire you to immediately begin living your life on purpose toward building a better world. It’s your time to thrive! www.ChristineHorner.com. www.AwakeningLeader.org

    • Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)
      March 2006

      Marisa

      by Peter Cowlam

      The book’s central time frame is the 1970s, when Bruce takes over a financial consultancy firm founded by his father, and Marisa inherits property. Love, lust and money are what drive them both, until their relationship meets its first challenge. Bruce retreats further into the world of commerce. Marisa’s interests are social and political. Twenty-five years on from their affair, a chance entry in one of Bruce’s business listings shows that Marisa is now boss of the Rae Agency – a media PR concern. Bruce, as he recollects their tumultuous relationship, is torn between his harmonious family life, and renewing contact with Marisa. Finally, when he does decide on a course of action, he has to face the truth of not having grasped the cultural separation their two different views of the world have wrought over the last quarter century.

    • Fiction
      January 2016

      Bonds of Love and Blood

      by Marylee Macdonald

      Whether far from home or longing to escape, the people in these stories find themselves displaced from their normal routines. They misread the signals and wind up stranded on lonely beaches or seizing the moment before happiness flits away. "MacDonald applies insight, power, and delicacy to create characters between whom the psychic space virtually sizzles." —FOREWORD REVIEWS "engrossing"—MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW "With elegant prose enlivened by shards of mean humor, MacDonald captures how hard it is to love and/or trust abroad or at home."—KIRKUS REVIEWS "Author Marylee MacDonald has done an absolutely masterful job of presenting her readers with short stories so beautifully written that the characters will stay in your mind long after the story, and indeed the book, is done."—READERS’ FAVORITE "In her collection of twelve brilliantly-written short stories, MacDonald explores the pain and beauty of human relationships. MacDonald’s writing is raw and visceral, creating a strong emotional connection between her characters and the reader."—US REVIEW OF BOOKS "Bonds of Love and Blood is brilliantly written and nothing less than emotive."—HOLLYWOOD BOOK REVIEWS "Poignant, honest,and compelling... Highly recommended."—PACIFIC BOOK REVIEW "MacDonald dares to question which is the greater, more unsettling risk: the alluring intimacy of foreign terrains, or the intimate dangers of domesticity?" —Tara Ison, author of Reeling Through Life and Child out of Alcatraz "Her characters remind us of our universal and contradictory longing for solitude and for connection. Savor this book. Enjoy being in the hands of a generous and visionary writer." —Eileen Favorite, author of The Heroines "These elegantly crafted stories brim with emotional wisdom and eloquence. Bearing you around the world, they will imprint themselves, deeply, indelibly, upon your heart." —Melissa Pritchard, author of Palmerino

    • Fiction
      July 2016

      New King Palmers

      by Peter Cowlam

      Winner of the 2018 Quagga Prize for Literary Fiction. Set in the late 1990s, in the months up to and after the death of Princess Diana, New King Palmers is narrated by its principal character Humfrey Joel, a close friend of Earl Eliot d’Oc. The earl’s ancestry is bound up with the Habsburgs and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. D’Oc is a member of the British Privy Council and a close friend of Prince Charles and Princess Diana. In the months preceding Diana’s death, he commissions a young theatre professional to develop a play. The play’s theme is constitutional issues surrounding Prince Charles, with the heir’s interests served by UK withdrawal from the EU, before it becomes a federal superstate. The commissioned play is called New King Palmers, and d’Oc maintains rigorous editorial control over it. When d’Oc’s death shortly follows Diana’s, Joel is named as d’Oc’s literary executor, with the task of bringing the play to the English stage. Supposedly written into the text is an encoded message from the British Privy Council on behalf of the House of Windsor, addressed to the stewards of the EU. When news of this leaks out no one in the British literary and theatrical worlds believes it. In fact most come to see Earl d’Oc as an invented character behind which Joel shields himself, when his own motives are themselves sinister. So sinister, an MI5 spook is put on the case.

    • Fiction
      May 2015

      Across the Rebel Network

      by Peter Cowlam

      Anno centres a federated Europe in an uncertain, and not-too-distant digital future, when politics, the media and mass communications have fused into one amorphous whole. He works for the Bureau of Data Protection (BDP), a federal government department responsible for monitoring the full range of material, in all media, posted into cyberspace. The BDP is forced to do this when rebel states are seceding, small satellites once of the federation but now at a remove from it, economically and socially. A handful of organised outsiders threatens to undermine the central state through a concerted propaganda war, using the federation’s own digital infrastructure. It is this climate of mutual suspicion that to Anno makes inevitable decades of digital guerrilla warfare. While his department takes steps to prevent this, he doesn’t reckon on the intervention of his old college sparring partner, Craig Diamond, who is now a powerful media mogul. The two engage in combat conducted through cyberspace, in a rare concoction of literary sci-fi.

    • Literary Fiction
      December 2018

      Once Upon a Time in Paris

      by Eliza Granville

      Like her last novel, Gretel and the Dark, Once Upon a Time in Paris cleverly combines a fairy-tale element with magic realism: in this case, an account of events in the life of Charles Perrault. Set in Paris in 1695, intertwining historical fact with multiple layers of fiction, Once Upon a Time in Paris invites readers to consider the possibility that the Tales of Mother Goose were not written by Charles Perrault (nor by his son, Pierre Darmancourt, as originally claimed), but by a reclusive figure almost entirely overlooked by history. The novel is set at that point where the tradition of oral story-telling is fast being absorbed by the written tale, and our mysterious recluse is caught between the two practices. Once Upon a Time in Paris offers a dazzling new insight into the connection between the ogre of folklore and fairy-tale and the post-Enlightenment feminist struggle.

    • Fiction
      August 2018

      Unto the Third and Fourth Generation

      by Richard Ayres

      Tony Cawson, 75 and in the early stages of dementia, has a dreadful secret dating back to his youth of which his daughter Rebecca is ashamed and which she dreads her children will discover. But Rebecca, a conflicted individual in a failing marriage, also has secrets in her past which she wishes to keep from them, and from her husband. As Tony’s dementia worsens, and as Rebecca’s inner conflicts lead to irrational behaviour, incidents occur which result in the gradual revelation of these secrets, with consequences for the whole family. Have the sins of the parents been passed down unto the third and fourth generation?

    • Fiction

      Tightrope

      by Jenny Gill

      Baby Boomer Fiction - No 2 in the Southhill Sagas, set in leafy Surrey to the south of London, although each book stands alone. Lizzie is not what one might think of as a typical vicar’s wife. She doesn’t sing in the choir, help with cake sales or the Sunday School. She doesn’t get involved in the parish life at all, but holds down a senior position at a major bank. Jacob and Lizzie have a good marriage, not exciting, but then few marriages are after twenty seven years. When Lizzie is selected to represent her branch at a banking conference up north she expects it to be interesting at best. What she doesn’t expect is to fall in love. She describes her life as having been lived in black and white thus far, and now she can see colour. But how can she grab her own happiness at the expense of others? How can she destroy her family for her own pleasure? But, if she throws away this opportunity, it will almost certainly never come again. A story of love, but above all the story of one woman’s moral dilemma

    • Teaching, Language & Reference

      West Coast Reins

      by Beverley Bassett Broad

      Book 1 of a historical saga based on a true story. How this book came to be written is a spooky story in itself. The author believes that 'an angel on her shoulder ' wrote it!

    • Adventure

      Erupting Lies

      by Beverley Bassett Broad

      3rd Book in a historical Saga Covers the eruption of Mount Tarawera in New Zealand and exciting dramatic events between NZ and Europe

    • Fiction
      July 2010

      The Prison of Perspective

      by Rudolph Bader

      A chance encounter, a road accident, an air crash, a hold-up at a bank: How do such events connect people? How do people see the situations from their different perspectives? Three narrative strands follow the lives of three individuals - Peter, Cathy and Ivan - through the second half of the 20th century, from post-war austerity and mediocrity in the 1950s and 1960s to the fast-moving life-style of the present decade, whereby the plot is embedded in real events of the period. The three biographies intersect at crucial points, which reveals their internal landscapes and the different ways of understanding reality. Things are not always what they seem, and we do not always know the whole truth. Playing with various time-levels, this novel of the mind deals primarily with potential fallacies of perception, sexual awakening, emotional exploitation and the proximity of death. How do we store the memorable events in our lives? And how do we cope with these memories as we grow older?

    • Fiction
      April 2011

      Acts of Terror and Contrition

      a nuclear fable and eight stories

      by Daniel Melnick

      ACTS OF TERROR AND CONTRITION) is both a political novella about Israel and a literary thriller telling the unofficial story of Israeli responses to Saddam Hussein’s missile attacks during the 1990-1 Iraq War – and the possibility that his missiles might carry nuclear warheads “to burn Israel to the ground,” as Tarik Aziz said then. This “nuclear fable” presents the secret history of the Mossad Special Operations Chief’s covert threats to force world governments to face what is at stake should Iraq have launched a nuclear attack. Desperate and unyielding in the face of Saddam’s threat, the Chief, Arie Schneider, puts a renegade plan into place, even as he confronts the machinations of the deeply-divided Israeli government. Shadowing all this is the presence of the first Intifada, an Arab mother, and particularly her Islamist son, who plots his own act of terror. Enmeshed in the nuclear crisis, Arie must yet face his troubled wife, their two children, and above all his father, Rami, a holocaust survivor and retired diplomat. In opposition to the extremity of Arie’s plan, the old man summonses all his wisdom and his wily, struggling will to confront his son (in an echo of the biblical sacrifice of Isaac). Accompanying the novella are 8 STORIES OF THE EIGHTIES: In “Einstein’s Sorrow,” the first story after the novella, a wry secular Jewish owner of a New York toy company is visited one night in 1980 (the great physicist’s centennial year) by the spirit of the genius, and together the two Jews mourn the development of the nuclear bomb. In “Your Name is Hiroshima,” set in the mid-eighties, a young professor creates a haunted poem in response to the film “Hiroshima, Mon Amour,” as he faces the needs of wife, mentor, department chair, during a visit to campus by a famed Russian poet. The third and fourth stories are told by two elderly characters – an Armenian-American in “Taste of the Sun” and, in “Contrapuntal Piece,” the Greek widow of the eminent German-Jewish expatriate pianist from Hungry Generations; each character seeks the clarity to go on in the face of maddening infirmities and the incomprehension of others. In the fifth story “Before the Revolution,” a former political activist takes his family on a European vacation in 1984, and on an Italian train he faces his youthful double, a fiery student anarchist. The final three stories in Terror and Contrition chronicle the life of Joe Mubar, a Syrian-Italian American artist. “Triptych” tells his story over 30 years from his abused childhood, through his youthful wildness, to his struggle to find his balance in marriage. The second story – “Odalisque” – presents Joe, after divorce, in his sexual collision with a woman in the college town where he teaches art. “The Fall of the Berlin Wall” – the third story in the trilogy – portrays a last chance Mubar has to break the cycle of failed communication and to right himself as a father to his teen-aged son in the America of 1989.

    • Fiction

      Pathological States - a novel

      by Daniel Melnick

      Dr. Morris Weisberg is a distinguished sixty-year-old pathologist as well as an amateur violinist and classical music lover. The quixotic and troubled doctor discovers a disastrous instance of malpractice and a cover-up reaching to the office of the Director of his California hospital. During this year of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Eichmann’s execution, and above-ground nuclear testing, Doctor Weisberg struggles to find a way to confront his own crisis. Morris and his wife, Sandra, were born in Europe near the start of the twentieth century, and each was brought to America at an early age. In 1962, the couple is living in suburbia, in L.A.’s San Fernando Valley. They have two sons. Both are aspiring artists in their twenties, and one is straight, the other gay. As they test limits and act out their resentments, the household begins to fill with excesses, revelations, and rebellion. At work and at home, communication fails, brutal buried truths erupt, and Morris begins to descend into maddening depression. He seeks refuge in his love of classical music and in his California garden. His glassed-in lanai there offers him solace, a place – like Los Angeles itself – of pleasure and escape, which ends up being a haunted, alienated space. As Morris plummets, his struggle to keep affirming his faith in both science and music wavers. Dr. Weisberg becomes a powerfully moving, larger-than-life character – noble, destructive, and terrifying.

    • Fiction
      December 2014

      THE HIDDEN HATRED

      by J. MAIRY DIETCH'

      ? THE HIDDEN HATRED is the story of homosexuality as a phenomenon that appears to be universal, while social pressure, combined with a specific perception of traditional values, can lead a young man to the extreme: a plot full of the unexpected.Two African parents discover the homosexuality of 3 of their 4 boys the hardest way: they are watching the news on TV when the latters, who have immigrated in Europe some few years ago without notice, pop up on their screen kissing other men during a gay parade. This creates a dreadful and devastating storm in their lives, taking in account the fact that in their context, homosexuality is so condemned that it is compared to curse. They are excluded from everything, living isolated, and their last son, Jean-Noël, twenty years and only heterosexual of the brotherhood is forced to leave his school, being also abandoned by Noemie, his longtime girl friend. Months later, the same parents learn that their only girl, married, with 2 daughters, is having an affair with a woman who is none other than their country's minister of social affairs. The social comdemnation grows even higher and harsher. They are accused of having not educated their children properly and the retaliation attitudes are terrible, coming from the less expected people. This is a little too much for them, the poor parents commit suicide, taking their lives simultaneously. Remained orphan, Jean-Noël blames his family's tragedy on the media which programs, according to him, caused his siblings to turn homosexual and for this reason, he starts hating them with all his heart. Yet, realizing that he can't live with such destroying feeling, he battles it déterminingly. Unfortunately, when he thinks he has found peace of mind, Rocky Butten, an Hollywood filmmaker, comes to the natural reserve where he works as a tour guide, supposedly for vacations; supposedly for Rocky will fall in love with Félicité, the manager of the natural reserve; they will marry and give birth to triplets, three boys. The encounter with this ultimate representative of the abhorred professional category awakes the young boy's hatred again, revealing it even stronger, deeper than ever. And here is the beginning of a "sui generis" development of the complexity of the human psyche, which strange and incredible manifestations will lead Jean-Noel to crime. Though Rocky only shows him trust and friendship, the latter will kill him in a very ingenious way. Afterwards, with a similar creative manner, he will kill his entire family. But the only thing his evil genius hadn't planned is that Dylan, one of Rocky's son will survive. But he will survive, to only discover years later, when they already have two kids, that Alicia, his sweet wife, is the very niece of Jean-Noël, the man who decimated all his beloved ones! How will Dylan live with that discovery? What will he decide? Abandoning her? show understanding? Whatever he decides will his psyche allow him true peace of mind?

    • Fiction
      December 2015

      Last Call & other short stories

      by Edited by P Comley, Contributions from: Robert Hull, Claire Lawrence, Jane Connolly, Vanessa Horn, Myra King, Carol Fenlon, Gail Landon, Gabrielle Mullarkey, Juliet Robinson, Linda Tyler

      From Swiss mountain ranges to small-town Canada, across urban and rural landscapes, local and faraway. These stories - of fictitious canines, portrayed in many different circumstances, as their 'jobs' dictate or their conditions demand - take the reader on countless memorable journeys that amazingly are also able to reflect that 'vast, often unfathomable melting-pot of human emotions and intentions'. Celebrate this compelling variety of tales written by ten different authors who were selected as the best from a large number of submissions to the 2015 Ouen Press 'working dogs' short story competition.

    • Fiction
      April 2016

      Palette of Secrets

      by Joan Fallon

      Palette of Secrets is a mystery story about a famous, but reclusive, artist, Nancy Miller. Nancy has been persuaded by her agent to publish her memoirs but needs a ghost writer to help her to write them. She finds a young woman called Ana who is keen to take on the job. However, as Nancy starts to recount her life story, it becomes obvious to Ana that the artist is hiding something, so she decides to dig more deeply into Nancy’s past. When she eventually works out what Nancy's terrible secret is, she doesn’t know what to do with the information - should she include it in the book and risk ruining Nancy's international reputation or should she tell Nancy's son what she has discovered? Either way the consequences threaten to be devastating for Nancy and her family.

    • Fiction
      November 2016 - December 2016

      Shambala Junction

      by Dipika Mukherjee

      Iris, an American, is visiting India for the first time with her fiancée and not enjoying the trip. When she steps down from the train at Shambala Junction to buy a bottle of water, little does she know that her life will radically change. Stranded at the small town, she becomes involved in a local stall-holder’s battle to recover a lost child - one which is about to be sold to a rich Westerner. Along the way, she discovers not only herself - but friendship, courage and a love of India.

    • Fiction
      April 2016

      Palette of Secrets

      by Joan Fallon

      Palette of Secrets is a mystery story about a famous, but reclusive, artist, Nancy Miller. Nancy has been persuaded by her agent to publish her memoirs but needs a ghost writer to help her to write them. She finds a young woman called Ana who is keen to take on the job. However, as Nancy starts to recount her life story, it becomes obvious to Ana that the artist is hiding something, so she decides to dig more deeply into Nancy’s past. When she eventually works out what Nancy's terrible secret is, she doesn’t know what to do with the information - should she include it in the book and risk ruining Nancy's international reputation or should she tell Nancy's son what she has discovered? Either way the consequences threaten to be devastating for Nancy and her family.

    • Fiction
      April 2016

      Palette of Secrets

      by Joan Fallon

      Palette of Secrets is a mystery story about a famous, but reclusive, artist, Nancy Miller. Nancy has been persuaded by her agent to publish her memoirs but needs a ghost writer to help her to write them. She finds a young woman called Ana who is keen to take on the job. However, as Nancy starts to recount her life story, it becomes obvious to Ana that the artist is hiding something, so she decides to dig more deeply into Nancy’s past. When she eventually works out what Nancy's terrible secret is, she doesn’t know what to do with the information - should she include it in the book and risk ruining Nancy's international reputation or should she tell Nancy's son what she has discovered? Either way the consequences threaten to be devastating for Nancy and her family.

    • Fiction
      April 2017

      Cody, The Medicine Man and Me

      by Alan Wilkinson

      Cody, The Medicine Man and Me is a rites of passage story about a middle-aged man who takes a trip across the USA that transforms into the ultimate voyage of personal discovery. Attempting to establish the truth of his baffling ancestry, and struggling to prepare himself for a reunion with his estranged twin brother – old rivalries quickly resurface. A showdown brews - but ultimately only one of the brothers can ride off into the sunset.

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