• Literary studies: plays & playwrights
      April 2012

      Golden Age Drama in Contemporary Spain

      The Comedia on Page, Stage and Screen

      by Duncan Wheeler (Author)

      This is the first monograph on the performance and reception of sixteenth- and seventeenth- century national drama in contemporary Spain, which attempts to remedy the traditional absence of performance-based approaches in Golden Age studies. The book contextualises the socio-historical background to the modern-day performance of the country’s three major Spanish baroque playwrights (Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega and Tirso Molina), whilst also providing detailed aesthetic analyses of individual stage and screen adaptations.

    • Literature: history & criticism
      November 2000

      Theatricality as Medium

      by Samuel Weber

      Ever since Aristotle's Poetics, both the theory and the practice of theater have been governed by the assumption that it is a form of representation dominated by what Aristotle calls the muthos, or the "plot." This conception of theater has subordinated characteristics related to the theatrical medium, such as the process and place of staging, to the demands of a unified narrative. This readable, thought-provoking, and multidisciplinary study explores theatrical writings that question this aesthetical-generic conception and seek instead to work with the medium of theatricality itself. Beginning with Plato, Samuel Weber tracks the uneasy relationships among theater, ethics, and philosophy through Aristotle, the major Greek tragedians, Shakespeare, Kierkegaard, Kafka, Freud, Benjamin, Artaud, and many others who develop alternatives to dominant narrative-aesthetic assumptions about the theatrical medium. His readings also interrogate the relation of theatricality to the introduction of electronic media.;The result is to show that, far from breaking with the characteristics of live staged performance, the new media intensify ambivalences about place and identity already at work in theater since the Greeks.

    • Literary studies: general
      November 2008

      A Fury in the Words

      Love and Embarrassment in Shakespeare's Venice

      by Harry Berger, Jr.

    • Literary studies: general
      November 2008

      A Fury in the Words

      Love and Embarrassment in Shakespeare's Venice

      by Harry Berger, Jr.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      May 2008

      Loaded Words

      by Marjorie Garber

    • Literature & Literary Studies

      The Shakespearean Ethic

      by John Vyvyan

      ‘… the most original book about Shakespeare I have ever read'Christopher BookerOriginally published by Chatto & Windus in 1959, this book has long been out of print and largely neglected by Shakespearean scholars. It offers a viewpoint seldom considered: an unusual and exceptionally clear insight into Shakespeare’s philosophy. It does so with freshness, modesty and conviction.Appreciating the danger Shakespeare faced in writing at a time of major religious intolerance, Vyvyan shows how subtly the plays explore aspects of the perennial philosophy allegorically. In doing so, Shakespeare raises the fundamental question of ethics: What ought we to do?‘Shakespeare,’ says the author, ‘is never ethically neutral. He is never in doubt as to whether the souls of his characters are rising or falling.’ There is a constant pattern in the tragedies: ‘first the hero is untrue to his own self, then he casts out love, then conscience is gone – or rather inverted – and the devil enters into him.’ Vyvyan shows us this pattern of damnation, or its counterpart – a pattern of regeneration – working out in certain plays, contrasting Hamlet with Measure for Measure and Othello with The Winter’s Tale, where a similar dilemma and choice confront the hero. His intuitive insights also illumine Macbeth, Julius Caesar and Titus Andronicus which focus on the fall, whereas The Tempest explores most fully the pattern of regeneration and creative mercy.Here is a book, both thought-provoking and persuasive, which will send many readers back to Shakespeare’s plays with fresh vision and clearer understanding. To assist such readers, this edition cross-references the quotations in the text to the relevant place in the play. The text has been completely reset and the index expanded.

    • The Arts

      Hell Unlimited

      Where Shakespeare Met Goethe

      by Joanne Maria McNally

      In short, incisive scenes this novella explores the role of theatre, film, dreams and nightmares in and beyond life in a situation of sadistic imprisonment, and explores the way the inevitable and dramatic unfolding of their oppressors’ horrific plans impact upon the lives of three individuals (who are also artists) and their friendship. The novella has a contemporary feel due to the framing of it in the present and in the form of a talk to an audience. It opens with the main character, an elderly famous actor known only as Carl, reciting Shakespeare to the walls of a dilapidated barrack. His much younger friend, an acclaimed photographer and cameraman known only as Carl’s friend, and a new arrival to the camp, breaks the illusion of Carl’s apparent spell of madness with ‘his rescue’ of Carl by reciting some lines from Carl’s earlier portrayal of Goethe’s Mephistopheles on the stages in Prague, and by reminding him of their shared friendship and companionship before the terror was unleashed. Simultaneously, the backdrop of evil, and Faust’s pact with the devil is brought immediately into sharp focus, and is omnipresent in various forms throughout as the protagonists struggle with their sense of theatre and reality before and since life in the camp and their own use of illusion, illicit theatrical performances and dreams as a self-preservation strategy during their imprisonment. Lines from Shakespeare and Goethe’s ‘Faust’ are interspersed with the characters’ own reflections and interactions and lift the characters to a higher plain, and beyond the immediate brutal circumstances and oppression. The slow-moving opening gives way to an ever-increasing momentum as external circumstances plunge the two main protagonists into situations which force them to the edge of humanity. The work sounds very interesting indeed Patrick Spottiswode, Director, Globe Education The novella also exists as a play (updated by the author between 2011- 2013).

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      Shakespeare and the Prince of Love

      The Feast of Misrule in the Middle Temple

      by Anthony. Arlidge

      Through his researches in the rich archive of 16th and 17th century manuscripts and documents at the Middle Temple in London, where he is a senior barrister, Anthony Arlidge has revealed that Shakespeare's Twelfth Night was commissioned for performance there in 1602. Middle Temple Hall is the only building surviving from Shakespeare's time where it is known that one of his plays had its first night.;He shows that, with its many legal references and 'inn-jokes', Twelfth Night was almost certainly written for an audience of lawyers. The Middle Temple was in fact full of talented young poets and playwrights at the time -- John Webster, John Ford and John Marston, author of What You Will, amongst others -- and it seems probable that Shakespeare knew some of them personally. Also, a 'cousin' of Shakespeare's was a student in the Inn in 1602. Like other Inns of Court, it had its own tradition of holding a feast of 'misrule' over the Christmas period, led by the Bright Prince of Burning Love. Twelfth Night has many oblique references to such festivities. That, for example, is the meaning in Italian of the name of the important character Feste. The still extant text of the Inn's 1597/8 festivities is included complete in an appendix.;In the course of the book, Anthony Arlidge describes in detail the background of the contemporary legal world, and brings to life the extravagant literary and social milieu of the Elizabethan Inns of Court in all its complexity. Shakespeare and the Prince of Love is written in such a way that it will have a strong appeal to the general reader as well as to Shakespeare enthusiasts, students of English literature and historians, for whom it will be an essential acquisition.

    • Literary studies: plays & playwrights
      April 2012

      Golden Age Drama in Contemporary Spain

      The Comedia on Page, Stage and Screen

      by Duncan Wheeler (Author)

      This is the first monograph on the performance and reception of sixteenth- and seventeenth- century national drama in contemporary Spain, which attempts to remedy the traditional absence of performance-based approaches in Golden Age studies. The book contextualises the socio-historical background to the modern-day performance of the country’s three major Spanish baroque playwrights (Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega and Tirso Molina), whilst also providing detailed aesthetic analyses of individual stage and screen adaptations.

    • Literary theory
      November 2000

      Theatricality as Medium

      by Samuel Weber

      Ever since Aristotle's Poetics, both the theory and the practice of theater have been governed by the assumption that it is a form of representation dominated by what Aristotle calls the muthos, or the "plot." This conception of theater has subordinated characteristics related to the theatrical medium, such as the process and place of staging, to the demands of a unified narrative. This readable, thought-provoking, and multidisciplinary study explores theatrical writings that question this aesthetical-generic conception and seek instead to work with the medium of theatricality itself. Beginning with Plato, Samuel Weber tracks the uneasy relationships among theater, ethics, and philosophy through Aristotle, the major Greek tragedians, Shakespeare, Kierkegaard, Kafka, Freud, Benjamin, Artaud, and many others who develop alternatives to dominant narrative-aesthetic assumptions about the theatrical medium. His readings also interrogate the relation of theatricality to the introduction of electronic media.;The result is to show that, far from breaking with the characteristics of live staged performance, the new media intensify ambivalences about place and identity already at work in theater since the Greeks.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      May 2008

      Loaded Words

      by Marjorie Garber

    • Literary studies: plays & playwrights

      State of Play

      Four Playwrights of Wales

      by Hazel Walford. Davies

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      Shakespeare and the Rose of Love

      by John Vyvyan

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      Shakespeare and Platonic Beauty

      by John Vyvyan

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      The Storm at Sea

      Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare

      by Christopher Pye

      The Storm at Sea: Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare counters a tradition of cultural analysis that judges considerations of aesthetic autonomy in the early modern context to be either anachronistic or an index of political disengagement. Pye argues that for a post-theocratic era in which the mise-en-forme of the social domain itself was for the first time at stake, the problem of the aesthetic lay at the very core of the political; it is precisely through its engagement with the question of aesthetic autonomy that early modern works most profoundly explore their relation to matters of law, state, sovereignty, and political subjectivity. Pye establishes the significance of a “creationist” political aesthetic—at once a discrete historical category and a phenomenon that troubles our familiar forms of historical accounting—and suggests that the fate of such an aesthetic is intimately bound up with the emergence of modern conceptions of the political sphere. The Storm at Sea moves historically from Leonardo da Vinci to Thomas Hobbes; it focuses on Shakespeare and English drama, with chapters on Hamlet, Othello, A Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, as well as sustained readings of As You Like It, King Lear, Thomas Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, and Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus. Engaging political thinkers such as Carl Schmitt, Giorgio Agamben, Claude Lefort, and Roberto Esposito, The Storm at Sea will be of interest to political theorists as well as to students of literary and visual theory.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      The Storm at Sea

      Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare

      by Christopher Pye

      The Storm at Sea: Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare counters a tradition of cultural analysis that judges considerations of aesthetic autonomy in the early modern context to be either anachronistic or an index of political disengagement. Pye argues that for a post-theocratic era in which the mise-en-forme of the social domain itself was for the first time at stake, the problem of the aesthetic lay at the very core of the political; it is precisely through its engagement with the question of aesthetic autonomy that early modern works most profoundly explore their relation to matters of law, state, sovereignty, and political subjectivity. Pye establishes the significance of a “creationist” political aesthetic—at once a discrete historical category and a phenomenon that troubles our familiar forms of historical accounting—and suggests that the fate of such an aesthetic is intimately bound up with the emergence of modern conceptions of the political sphere. The Storm at Sea moves historically from Leonardo da Vinci to Thomas Hobbes; it focuses on Shakespeare and English drama, with chapters on Hamlet, Othello, A Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, as well as sustained readings of As You Like It, King Lear, Thomas Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, and Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus. Engaging political thinkers such as Carl Schmitt, Giorgio Agamben, Claude Lefort, and Roberto Esposito, The Storm at Sea will be of interest to political theorists as well as to students of literary and visual theory.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      The Storm at Sea

      Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare

      by Christopher Pye

      The Storm at Sea: Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare counters a tradition of cultural analysis that judges considerations of aesthetic autonomy in the early modern context to be either anachronistic or an index of political disengagement. Pye argues that for a post-theocratic era in which the mise-en-forme of the social domain itself was for the first time at stake, the problem of the aesthetic lay at the very core of the political; it is precisely through its engagement with the question of aesthetic autonomy that early modern works most profoundly explore their relation to matters of law, state, sovereignty, and political subjectivity. Pye establishes the significance of a “creationist” political aesthetic—at once a discrete historical category and a phenomenon that troubles our familiar forms of historical accounting—and suggests that the fate of such an aesthetic is intimately bound up with the emergence of modern conceptions of the political sphere. The Storm at Sea moves historically from Leonardo da Vinci to Thomas Hobbes; it focuses on Shakespeare and English drama, with chapters on Hamlet, Othello, A Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, as well as sustained readings of As You Like It, King Lear, Thomas Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, and Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus. Engaging political thinkers such as Carl Schmitt, Giorgio Agamben, Claude Lefort, and Roberto Esposito, The Storm at Sea will be of interest to political theorists as well as to students of literary and visual theory.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism

      The Storm at Sea

      Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare

      by Christopher Pye

      The Storm at Sea: Political Aesthetics in the Time of Shakespeare counters a tradition of cultural analysis that judges considerations of aesthetic autonomy in the early modern context to be either anachronistic or an index of political disengagement. Pye argues that for a post-theocratic era in which the mise-en-forme of the social domain itself was for the first time at stake, the problem of the aesthetic lay at the very core of the political; it is precisely through its engagement with the question of aesthetic autonomy that early modern works most profoundly explore their relation to matters of law, state, sovereignty, and political subjectivity. Pye establishes the significance of a “creationist” political aesthetic—at once a discrete historical category and a phenomenon that troubles our familiar forms of historical accounting—and suggests that the fate of such an aesthetic is intimately bound up with the emergence of modern conceptions of the political sphere. The Storm at Sea moves historically from Leonardo da Vinci to Thomas Hobbes; it focuses on Shakespeare and English drama, with chapters on Hamlet, Othello, A Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, as well as sustained readings of As You Like It, King Lear, Thomas Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, and Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus. Engaging political thinkers such as Carl Schmitt, Giorgio Agamben, Claude Lefort, and Roberto Esposito, The Storm at Sea will be of interest to political theorists as well as to students of literary and visual theory.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      September 2009

      Shakespearean Gothic

      by Christy Desmet (Editor), Anne Williams (Editor),

      This book explores the paradox that the Gothic (today’s werewolves, vampires, and horror movies) owe their origins (and their legitimacy) to eighteenth-century interpretations of Shakespeare. As Shakespeare was being established as the supreme British writer throughout the century, he was cited as justification for early Gothic writers’ fascination with the supernatural, their abandoning of literary “decorum,” and their fascination with otherness and extremes of every kind. This book addresses the gap for an up to date analysis of Shakespeare’s relation to the Gothic. An authority on the Gothic, E.J. Clery, has stated that “It would be impossible to overestimate the importance of Shakespeare as touchstone and inspiration for the terror mode, even if we feel the offspring are unworthy of their parent. Scratch the surface of any Gothic fiction and the debt to Shakespeare will be there.” This book therefore addresses Shakespeare’s importance to the Gothic tradition as a whole and also to particular, well-known and often studied Gothic works. It also considers the influence of the Gothic on Shakespeare, both in-print and on stage in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain. The introductory chapter places the chapters within the historical development of both Shakespearean reception and Gothic Studies. The book is divided into three parts: 1) Gothic Appropriations of “Shakespeare”; 2) Rewriting Shakespearean Plays and Characters; 3) Shakespeare Before/After the Gothic.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      September 2009

      Shakespearean Gothic

      by Christy Desmet (Editor), Anne Williams (Editor),

      This book explores the paradox that the Gothic (today’s werewolves, vampires, and horror movies) owe their origins (and their legitimacy) to eighteenth-century interpretations of Shakespeare. As Shakespeare was being established as the supreme British writer throughout the century, he was cited as justification for early Gothic writers’ fascination with the supernatural, their abandoning of literary “decorum,” and their fascination with otherness and extremes of every kind. This book addresses the gap for an up to date analysis of Shakespeare’s relation to the Gothic. An authority on the Gothic, E.J. Clery, has stated that “It would be impossible to overestimate the importance of Shakespeare as touchstone and inspiration for the terror mode, even if we feel the offspring are unworthy of their parent. Scratch the surface of any Gothic fiction and the debt to Shakespeare will be there.” This book therefore addresses Shakespeare’s importance to the Gothic tradition as a whole and also to particular, well-known and often studied Gothic works. It also considers the influence of the Gothic on Shakespeare, both in-print and on stage in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain. The introductory chapter places the chapters within the historical development of both Shakespearean reception and Gothic Studies. The book is divided into three parts: 1) Gothic Appropriations of “Shakespeare”; 2) Rewriting Shakespearean Plays and Characters; 3) Shakespeare Before/After the Gothic.

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