• Literature & Literary Studies
      May 2018

      The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829

      by Christina Morin

      The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760-1829 offers a compelling account of the development of gothic literature in late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century Ireland. Countering traditional scholarly views of the 'rise' of 'the gothic novel' on the one hand, and, on the other, Irish Romantic literature, this study persuasively re-integrates a body of now overlooked works into the history of the literary gothic as it emerged across Ireland, Britain, and Europe between 1760 and 1829. Its twinned quantitative and qualitative analysis of neglected Irish texts produces a new formal, generic, and ideological map of gothic literary production in this period, persuasively positioning Irish works and authors at the centre of a new critical paradigm with which to understand both Irish Romantic and gothic literary production.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      July 2018

      Der Reformator und Aufklärer Martin Opitz (1597–1639)

      Ein Humanist im Zeitalter der Krisis

      by Klaus Garber

      Hundert Jahre nach der Reformation ging ein zündendes Manifest für eine neue Literatur in deutscher Sprache gemäß den Standards der europäischen Renaissance hinaus in die Welt. Es war das Jahr, da die ‚Fruchtbringende Gesellschaft‘ als namhafteste kulturpolitische Vereinigung auf deutschem Boden noch vor der ‚Académie Française‘ gegründet wurde. Das Jahr 1617 ist ein Schlüsseldatum der deutschen Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte. Martin Opitz lieferte ihm die Stichworte. Zwischen Conrad Celtis und Johann Christoph Gottsched nimmt er die entscheidende Mittelstellung ein. Als ‚Vater der deutschen Dichtung‘ ist er in die Literaturgeschichte eingegangen, aber er war mehr als das. An der Wende vom 16. zum 17. Jahrhundert erlebte er mit seinen wachen späthumanistischen Weggefährten in Europa den Zusammenbruch der ‚una societas christiana‘ und die Wehen der neuen Zeit. Als unermüdlicher Streiter für religiöse Toleranz, für patriotische Versöhnung über die Konfessionsgrenzen hinweg und für eine den Nachbarländern ebenbürtige deutsche Sprache und Poesie wirkte er an vorderster Stelle mit an dem Brückenschlag vom Humanismus zur Aufklärung, wie er um 1600 allenthalben erfolgte. Klaus Garber entfaltet in zwanzig Kapiteln ein neues und unverändert aktuelles Bild des großen Autors.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      July 2019

      Horror and Religion

      New literary approaches to Theology, Race and Sexuality

      by Eleanor Beal, Jonathan Greenaway

      Horror and Religion is an edited collection of essays offering structured discussions of spiritual and theological conflicts in horror from the late-sixteenth to the twenty-first century. Contributors explore the various ways that horror and religion have interacted over themes of race and sexuality.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      November 2019

      Middle English Devotional Compilations

      Composing Imaginative Variations in Late Medieval England

      by Diana Denissen

      Middle English Devotional Compilations approaches compiling as a literary activity and as an active way of shaping the medieval text. This monograph examines three major but understudied Middle English devotional compilations in depth: the Pore Caitif, The Tretyse of Love and A Talkyng of the Love of God.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      August 2000

      Heidegger, Hölderlin, and the Subject of Poetic Language

      Toward a New Poetics of Dasein

      by Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei

      Heidegger's interpretations of the poetry of Holderlin are central to Heidegger's later philosophy and have determined the mainstream reception of Holderlin's poetry. Gosetti-Ferencei argues that Heidegger has overlooked central elements in Holderlin's poetics, such as a Kantian understanding of aesthetic subjectivity and a commitment to Enlightenment ideals. These elements, she argues, resist the more politically distressing aspects of Heidegger's interpretations, including his nationalist valorization of the German language and sense of nationhood, or Heimat. In the context of Holderlin's poetics of alienation, exile, and wandering, Gosetti-Ferencei draws a different model of poetic subjectivity. She poses a phenomenologically sensitive theory of poetic language and a "new poetics of Dasein," or being there.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      April 2008

      The Pain of Reformation

      Spenser, Vulnerability, and the Ethics of Masculinity

      by Joseph Campana

    • Diaries, letters & journals

      Robert Burns

      A Life in Letters

      by George Scott. Wilkie

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets

      Select Works of Robert Burns

      Verse, Explanation and Glossary

      by George Scott. Wilkie

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800
      July 2008

      Enlightened Sentiments

      Judgment and Autonomy in the Age of Sensibility

      by Hina Nazar

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      December 2007

      Genealogies of Fiction

      Women Warriors and the Dynastic Imagination in the 'Orlando furioso'

      by Eleonora Stoppino

    • Poetry

      Understanding Robert Burns

      Verse, Explanation and Glossary

      by George Scott. Wilkie

      The poems of Robert Burns are known throughout the world, but are rarely understood. For too long lovers of his poetry and songs have struggled with the meaning of many of the bard's words. Following the success of George Wilkie's Select Works of Roberts Burns, this expanded volume of Burns' poetry, with 138 poems, captures the same ethos as the original. Opposite every stanza of each poem the meaning of what Burns has written is printed along with a helpful glossary to enable to reader to gain an immediate understanding. No delving into notes at the end of the book is necessary. This is a major development in access to the works of Robert Burns and is the only book on the works of Robert Burns that allows the reader to gain an immediate understanding of what the poems mean.

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets

      The Lassies

      by Robert Burns

      Robert Burns was fond of women, and his well-documented affairs have earned him a reputation as a rake and womaniser. It was said that he couldn't just admire a lass, he would fall head-over-heels. And every woman that Burns loved became a flawless beauty with an equally flawless character.;During his short life Burns wrote a great deal of poetry to or about women. Some were written as love poems or songs, intended to sway the heart of whoever had caught his eye, others in honour of a more casual acquaintance whose beauty or talents had impressed him in some way. Others were composed simply as a form of thank you. This is a collection of all these poems, each accompanied by a detailed history of Burns' relationship with the subject. Was he the philanderer and rake he's said to be? George Scott Wilkie looks at the letters, poems and sonnets - a collection covering over 80 women from his first flighty glance of a haughty laird's daughter, through the women who fathered his children to the delectable, unattainable Clarinda.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800

      Lyric Apocalypse

      Milton, Marvell, and the Nature of Events

      by Ryan Netzley

      What’s new about the apocalypse? Revelation does not allow us to look back after the end and enumerate pivotal turning points. It happens in an immediate encounter with the transformatively new. John Milton’s and Andrew Marvell’s lyrics attempt to render the experience of such an apocalyptic change in the present. In this respect they take seriously the Reformation’s insistence that eschatology is a historical phenomenon. Yet these poets are also reacting to the Regicide, and, as a result, their works explore very modern questions about the nature of events, what it means for a significant historical occasion to happen. Lyric Apocalypse argues that Milton’s and Marvell’s lyrics challenge any retrospective understanding of events, including one built on a theory of revolution. Instead, these poems show that there is no “after” to the apocalypse, that if we are going to talk about change, we should do so in the present, when there is still time to do something about it. For both of these poets, lyric becomes a way to imagine an apocalyptic event that would be both hopeful and new.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800

      Lyric Apocalypse

      Milton, Marvell, and the Nature of Events

      by Ryan Netzley

      What’s new about the apocalypse? Revelation does not allow us to look back after the end and enumerate pivotal turning points. It happens in an immediate encounter with the transformatively new. John Milton’s and Andrew Marvell’s lyrics attempt to render the experience of such an apocalyptic change in the present. In this respect they take seriously the Reformation’s insistence that eschatology is a historical phenomenon. Yet these poets are also reacting to the Regicide, and, as a result, their works explore very modern questions about the nature of events, what it means for a significant historical occasion to happen. Lyric Apocalypse argues that Milton’s and Marvell’s lyrics challenge any retrospective understanding of events, including one built on a theory of revolution. Instead, these poems show that there is no “after” to the apocalypse, that if we are going to talk about change, we should do so in the present, when there is still time to do something about it. For both of these poets, lyric becomes a way to imagine an apocalyptic event that would be both hopeful and new.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800

      Lyric Apocalypse

      Milton, Marvell, and the Nature of Events

      by Ryan Netzley

      What’s new about the apocalypse? Revelation does not allow us to look back after the end and enumerate pivotal turning points. It happens in an immediate encounter with the transformatively new. John Milton’s and Andrew Marvell’s lyrics attempt to render the experience of such an apocalyptic change in the present. In this respect they take seriously the Reformation’s insistence that eschatology is a historical phenomenon. Yet these poets are also reacting to the Regicide, and, as a result, their works explore very modern questions about the nature of events, what it means for a significant historical occasion to happen. Lyric Apocalypse argues that Milton’s and Marvell’s lyrics challenge any retrospective understanding of events, including one built on a theory of revolution. Instead, these poems show that there is no “after” to the apocalypse, that if we are going to talk about change, we should do so in the present, when there is still time to do something about it. For both of these poets, lyric becomes a way to imagine an apocalyptic event that would be both hopeful and new.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800
      November 2015

      Same–sex desire in early modern England, 1550–1735

      An anthology of literary texts and contexts

      by Marie H. Loughlin

      Balancing long-overlooked and well-known works from early modern England, Same-sex desire in early modern England, 1550-1735: An anthology of literary texts and contexts is a collection of English texts about homoerotic love, relationships, desires, and sexual acts. The anthology's core texts are selections from works of drama, fiction, romance, poetry, essays and translation. These core texts are carefully introduced and annotated, and supplemented with illuminating contextual material from other early modern disciplines such as law, medicine, and theology. Juxtaposing literary and non-literary representations of same-sex erotic desire, this anthology explores a rich tradition of works both celebrating and condemning same-sex erotic love.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800
      November 2015

      Same–sex desire in early modern England, 1550–1735

      An anthology of literary texts and contexts

      by Marie H. Loughlin

      Balancing long-overlooked and well-known works from early modern England, Same-sex desire in early modern England, 1550-1735: An anthology of literary texts and contexts is a collection of English texts about homoerotic love, relationships, desires, and sexual acts. The anthology's core texts are selections from works of drama, fiction, romance, poetry, essays and translation. These core texts are carefully introduced and annotated, and supplemented with illuminating contextual material from other early modern disciplines such as law, medicine, and theology. Juxtaposing literary and non-literary representations of same-sex erotic desire, this anthology explores a rich tradition of works both celebrating and condemning same-sex erotic love.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800
      November 2015

      Transporting Chaucer

      by Helen Barr

      This book draws on the work of the British sculptor Antony Gormley alongside more traditional literary scholarship to argue for new relationships between Chaucer's poetry and works by others. Chaucer's playfulness with textual history and chronology anticipates how his own work is figured in later (and earlier) texts. Conventional models of source and analogue study are re-energised to reveal unexpected, and sometimes unsettling, literary cohabitations and re-placements. The author presents innovative readings of relationships between medieval texts and early modern drama, and between literary texts and material culture. Associations between medieval architecture, pilgrim practice, manuscript illustration and the soundscapes of dramatic performance reposition how we read Chaucer's oeuvre and what gets made of it. An invaluable resource for scholars and students of all levels with an interest in medieval English literary studies and early modern drama, Transporting Chaucer offers a new approach to how we encounter texts through time.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800
      November 2015

      Transporting Chaucer

      by Helen Barr

      This book draws on the work of the British sculptor Antony Gormley alongside more traditional literary scholarship to argue for new relationships between Chaucer's poetry and works by others. Chaucer's playfulness with textual history and chronology anticipates how his own work is figured in later (and earlier) texts. Conventional models of source and analogue study are re-energised to reveal unexpected, and sometimes unsettling, literary cohabitations and re-placements. The author presents innovative readings of relationships between medieval texts and early modern drama, and between literary texts and material culture. Associations between medieval architecture, pilgrim practice, manuscript illustration and the soundscapes of dramatic performance reposition how we read Chaucer's oeuvre and what gets made of it. An invaluable resource for scholars and students of all levels with an interest in medieval English literary studies and early modern drama, Transporting Chaucer offers a new approach to how we encounter texts through time.

    • Literary studies: c 1500 to c 1800
      September 2007

      Authorship and authority: the writings of James VI and I

      by Jane Rickard

      James VI of Scotland and I of England participated in the burgeoning literary culture of the Renaissance, not only as a monarch and patron, but as an author in his own right, publishing extensively in a number of different genres over four decades. As the first monograph devoted to James as an author, this book offers a fresh perspective on his reigns in Scotland and England, and also on the inter-relationship of authorship and authority, literature and politics in the Renaissance. Beginning with the poetry he wrote in Scotland in the 1580s, it moves through a wide range of his writings, including scriptural exegeses, political, social and theological treatises and printed speeches, concluding with his manuscript poetry of the early 1620s. The book combines extensive primary research into the preparation, material form and circulation of these varied writings, with theoretically informed consideration of the relationship between authors, texts and readers. The discussion thus explores James's responses to, and interventions in, a range of literary, political and religious debates, and reveals the development of his aims and concerns as an author.

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