• Literature & Literary Studies
      December 2015

      A History of Chinese and Foreign Literature Exchanges

      (17 Volumes)

      by Qian Linsen, Zhou Ning

      Based on the macro vision of world literature and world culture, the seriesshows the process of two-way multi-level communication between Chineseand foreign literature and culture. In the context of cross-cultural dialogues,global integration and cultural diversification, it helps to grasp the spiritualessence in the collision and blending of Chinese and foreign cultures. Theseries will comprehensively clarify the vivid and rich communicationbetween our literature and the world’s major literary systems, fully showingthe historical significance of Chinese culture. It will also provide valuableexperience for comparative literature studies at all levels of theory and practice.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      December 2018

      After 69 CE - Writing Civil War in Flavian Rome

      by Lauren Donovan Ginsberg, Darcy A. Krasne

      Trends in Classics, a series and journal edited by Franco Montanari and Antonios Rengakos, publishes innovative, interdisciplinary work which brings to the study of Greek and Latin texts the insights and methods of related disciplines such as narratology, intertextuality, reader-response criticism, and oral poetics. Both publications seek to publish research across the full range of classical antiquity. The series Trends in Classics - Supplementary Volumes welcomes monographs, edited volumes, conference proceedings and collections of papers; it provides an important forum for the ongoing debate about where Classics fits in modern cultural and historical studies. The journal Trends in Classics is published twice a year with approx. 160 pp. per issue. Each year one issue is devoted to a specific subject with articles edited by a guest editor.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      December 2018

      Ecstasy in the Classroom

      Trance, Self, and the Academic Profession in Medieval Paris

      by Even-Ezra, Ayelet

      Can ecstatic experiences be studied with the academic instruments of rational investigation? What kinds of religious illumination are experienced by academically minded people? And what is the specific nature of the knowledge of God that university theologians of the Middle Ages enjoyed compared with other modes of knowing God, such as rapture, prophecy, the beatific vision, or simple faith? Ecstasy in the Classroom explores the interface between academic theology and ecstatic experience in the first half of the thirteenth century, formative years in the history of the University of Paris, medieval Europe’s “fountain of knowledge.” It considers little-known texts by William of Auxerre, Philip the Chancellor, William of Auvergne, Alexander of Hales, and other theologians of this community, thus creating a group portrait of a scholarly discourse. It seeks to do three things. The first is to map and analyze the scholastic discourse about rapture and other modes of cognition in the first half of the thirteenth century. The second is to explicate the perception of the self that these modes imply: the possibility of transformation and the complex structure of the soul and its habits. The third is to read these discussions as a window on the predicaments of a newborn community of medieval professionals and thereby elucidate foundational tensions in the emergent academic culture and its social and cultural context. Juxtaposing scholastic questions with scenes of contemporary courtly romances and reading Aristotle’s Analytics alongside hagiographical anecdotes, Ecstasy in the Classroom challenges the often rigid historiographical boundaries between scholastic thought and its institutional and cultural context.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      September 2019

      Introducing the Medieval Dragon

      by Thomas Honegger

      It is the aim of this short study to explore the characteristics of the medieval dragon, to describe its pedigree in antiquity and beyond, to discuss the different and sometimes differing views on the dragon in the relevant medieval text types – notably encyclopaedias, religious texts, and secular poems and tales – and briefly to outline the development of the dragon in post-medieval literature and culture.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      November 2019

      Middle English Devotional Compilations

      Composing Imaginative Variations in Late Medieval England

      by Diana Denissen

      Middle English Devotional Compilations approaches compiling as a literary activity and as an active way of shaping the medieval text. This monograph examines three major but understudied Middle English devotional compilations in depth: the Pore Caitif, The Tretyse of Love and A Talkyng of the Love of God.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      September 2012

      The Holy Grail

      History and Legend

      by Juliette Wood (Author)

      The Holy Grail is one of the most fascinating themes in medieval literature. It was described as the vessel used by Jesus to celebrate the first Eucharist and it became the object of the greatest quest undertaken by King Arthur’s knight. This book examines the traditions attached to the Holy Grail from its first appearance in medieval romance through its transformation into an object of mystical significance in modern literature and film. It is a journey filled with knightly quests, mystics and holy relics, poets and novelists, outlandish speculation and serious thought.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      August 2007

      A Local Habitation and a Name

      Imagining Histories in the Italian Renaissance

      by Albert Russell Ascoli

    • Literary studies: poetry & poets
      August 2000

      Poets of Divine Love

      The Rhetoric of Franciscan Spiritual Poetry

      by Alessandro Vettori

      St. Francis of Assisi (c. 1181-1226) and Jacopone da Todi (c. 1236-1306) were two exemplars of a rich school of mystical poets writing in Umbria in the Franciscan religious tradition. Their powerful creations form a significant corpus of medieval Italian vernacular poetry only now being fully explored. Drawing on a wide range of literary, historical, linguistic, and anthropological approaches, Alessandro Vettori investigates the emerging Franciscan tradition in motifs of the body, metaphors of matrimony, and in musical harmony, as well as the relationships between Francis's poetic mission to Genesis, erotic love, ecstatic union, and the poetics of the sermon.

    • Poetry by individual poets
      May 2008

      Medieval Poetics and Social Practice

      Responding to the Work of Penn R. Szittya

      by Edited by Seeta Chaganti

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      March 2006

      Sodometries

      Renaissance Texts, Modern Sexualities

      by Jonathan Goldberg

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval

      Dante and Islam

      by Edited by Jan M. Ziolkowski

      Dante put Muhammad in one of the lowest circles of Hell. At the same time, the medieval Christian poet placed several Islamic philosophers much more honorably in Limbo. Furthermore, it has long been suggested that for much of the basic framework of the Divine Comedy Dante was indebted to apocryphal traditions about a “night journey” taken by Muhammad. Dante scholars have increasingly returned to the question of Islam to explore the often surprising encounters among religious traditions that the Middle Ages afforded. This collection of essays works through what was known of the Qur’an and of Islamic philosophy and science in Dante’s day and explores the bases for Dante’s images of Muhammad and Ali. It further compels us to look at key instances of engagement among Muslims, Jews, and Christians.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval

      Dante and Islam

      by Edited by Jan M. Ziolkowski

      Dante put Muhammad in one of the lowest circles of Hell. At the same time, the medieval Christian poet placed several Islamic philosophers much more honorably in Limbo. Furthermore, it has long been suggested that for much of the basic framework of the Divine Comedy Dante was indebted to apocryphal traditions about a “night journey” taken by Muhammad. Dante scholars have increasingly returned to the question of Islam to explore the often surprising encounters among religious traditions that the Middle Ages afforded. This collection of essays works through what was known of the Qur’an and of Islamic philosophy and science in Dante’s day and explores the bases for Dante’s images of Muhammad and Ali. It further compels us to look at key instances of engagement among Muslims, Jews, and Christians.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval

      Dante and Islam

      by Edited by Jan M. Ziolkowski

      Dante put Muhammad in one of the lowest circles of Hell. At the same time, the medieval Christian poet placed several Islamic philosophers much more honorably in Limbo. Furthermore, it has long been suggested that for much of the basic framework of the Divine Comedy Dante was indebted to apocryphal traditions about a “night journey” taken by Muhammad. Dante scholars have increasingly returned to the question of Islam to explore the often surprising encounters among religious traditions that the Middle Ages afforded. This collection of essays works through what was known of the Qur’an and of Islamic philosophy and science in Dante’s day and explores the bases for Dante’s images of Muhammad and Ali. It further compels us to look at key instances of engagement among Muslims, Jews, and Christians.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval

      Dante and Islam

      by Edited by Jan M. Ziolkowski

      Dante put Muhammad in one of the lowest circles of Hell. At the same time, the medieval Christian poet placed several Islamic philosophers much more honorably in Limbo. Furthermore, it has long been suggested that for much of the basic framework of the Divine Comedy Dante was indebted to apocryphal traditions about a “night journey” taken by Muhammad. Dante scholars have increasingly returned to the question of Islam to explore the often surprising encounters among religious traditions that the Middle Ages afforded. This collection of essays works through what was known of the Qur’an and of Islamic philosophy and science in Dante’s day and explores the bases for Dante’s images of Muhammad and Ali. It further compels us to look at key instances of engagement among Muslims, Jews, and Christians.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      March 2011

      The Arthur of Medieval Latin Literature

      The Development and Dissemination of the Arthurian Legend in Medieval Latin

      by Siân Echard (Editor)

      King Arthur is arguably the most recognizable literary hero of the European Middle Ages. His stories survive in many genres and many languages, but while scholars and enthusiasts alike know something of his roots in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Latin History of the Kings of Britain, most are unaware that there was a Latin Arthurian tradition which extended beyond Geoffrey. This collection of essays will highlight different aspects of that tradition, allowing readers to see the well-known and the obscure as part of a larger, often coherent whole. These Latin-literate scholars were as interested as their vernacular counterparts in the origins and stories of Britain's greatest heroes, and they made their own significant contributions to his myth.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      November 2014

      Trioedd Ynys Prydein

      The Triads of the Island of Britain

      by Rachel Bromwich (Editor)

      Rachel Bromwich's magisterial edition of Trioedd Ynys Prydein has long won its place as a classic of Celtic studies. This revised edition shows the author's continued mastery of the subject, including a new preface by Morfydd Owen, and will be essential reading for Celticists and for those interested in early British history and literature and in Arthurian studies.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      October 2013

      Darogan

      Prophecy, lament and absent heroes in medieval Welsh literature

      by Aled Llion Jones (Author)

      Political prophecy was a common mode of literature in the British Isles and much of Europe from the Middle Ages to at least as late as the Renaissance. At times of political instability especially, the manuscript record bristles with prophetic works that promise knowledge of dynastic futures. In Welsh, the later development of this mode is best known through the figure of the mab darogan, the ‘son of prophecy’, who – variously named as Arthur, Owain or a number of other heroes – will return to re-establish sovereignty. Such a returning hero is also a potent figure in English, Scottish and wider European traditions. This book explores the large body of prophetic poetry and prose contained in the earliest Welsh-language manuscripts, exploring the complexity of an essentially multilingual, multi-ethnic and multinational literary tradition, and with reference to this wider tradition critical and theoretical questions are raised of genre, signification and significance.

    • Literature & Literary Studies

      The Arthur of the Iberians

      The Arthurian Legends in the Spanish and Portuguese Worlds

      by David Hook (Editor)

      This book fills the Iberian linguistic and geographical gap in Arthurian studies, replacing the now-outdated work by William J. Entwistle (1925). It covers Arthurian material in all the major Peninsular Romance languages (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Galician); it follows the spread of Arthurian material overseas with the seaborne expansion of Spain and Portugal from Iberia into America and Asia in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries; and, as well as examining the specifically Arthurian texts themselves, it traces the continued influence of the medieval Arthurian material and its impact on the society, literature and culture of the Golden Age and beyond, including its presence in Don Quixote, the influential Spanish Arthurian-inspired romance Amadis de Gaula, and in Spanish ballads. Such was its influence that we find an indigenous American woman called 'Iseo' (Iseult); and an Arthurian story appeared in an indigenous language of the Philippines, Tagalog, as late as the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      November 2015

      Annotated Chaucer bibliography

      1997–2010

      by Mark Allen, Stephanie Amsel

      Author of The Canterbury Tales and foundation of the English literary tradition, Geoffrey Chaucer has been popular with readers, writers and scholars for over 600 years. More than 4600 books, essays, poems, stories, recordings and websites pertaining to Chaucer were published between 1997 and 2010, and this bibliography identifies each of them separately, providing publication information and a descriptive summary of contents. The bibliography also offers several useful discovery aids to enable users to locate individual items of interest, whether it be a study of the Wife of Bath's love life, a video about Chaucer's language, advice on how to teach a particular poem by Chaucer, or a murder mystery that features Chaucer as detective. Useful for scholars, teachers and students alike, this volume is a must for academic libraries.

    • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval
      July 2013

      Greenery

      Ecocritical readings of late medieval English literature

      by Gillian Rudd

      Humankind has always been fascinated by the world in which it finds itself, and puzzled by its relations to it. Today that fascination is often expressed in what is now called 'green' terms, reflecting concerns about the non-human natural world, puzzlement about how we relate to it, and anxiety about what we, as humans, are doing to it. So called green or eco-criticism acknowledges this concern. Greenery reaches back and offers new readings of English texts, both known and unfamiliar, informed by eco-criticism. After considering general issues pertaining to green criticism, Greenery moves on to a series of individual chapters arranged by theme (earth, trees, wilds, sea, gardens and fields) which provide individual close readings of selections from such familiar texts as Malory's Morte D'Arthur, Chaucer's Knight's and Franklin's Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Langland's Piers Plowman. These discussions are contextualized by considering them alongside hitherto marginalized texts such as lyrics, Patience and the romance Sir Orfeo. The result is a study which reinvigorates our customary reading of late Middle English literary texts while also allows us to reflect upon the vibrant new school of eco-criticism itself.

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