• Literary essays
      November 2017

      Drawn From Life

      Selected Essays of Michel de Montaigne

      by Michel de Montaigne, Tim Parks

      A new selection of Montaigne's essays that explore themes of fear, courage, mortality and personal freedom. In his vivid introduction, Tim Parks sheds new light on this enduringly popular figure whose essays are 'so engaging, so seductive, that many readers will revel in their intimacy and irreverence without entirely grasping the challenge they throw down to us.'

    • Literary essays
      November 2017

      Alchemy

      Writers on Truth, Lies and Fiction

      by Joanna Kavenna, Benjamin Markovits, Gabriel Josipivici, Partou Zia, Anakana Schofield

      A collection of inspiring essays by Joanna Kavenna, Benjamin Markovits, Gabriel Josipivici, Partou Zia and Anakana Schofield, introduced by Iain Sinclair. Works of art, novels, films are frequently bolstered by reference to the autobiography of the creator, or to underlying 'fact'. Where does that leave the imagination? Are fictions no longer relevant in our age of scientific materialism? Must we all 'get real' and become 'realistic'? Notting Hill Editions has commissioned five authors and artists to consider these questions as they relate to their own work, and to the work of those who have influenced and insptired them. They ask how life events - momentous or humdrum - process themselves inwardly and come out transformed into writing or art or music.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      November 2016

      The Mystery of Being Human

      God, Freedom and the NHS

      by Raymond Tallis

      In his latest collection of essays, author, physician and humanist philosopher Raymond Tallis meditates on the complexity of human consciousness, free will, mathematics, God and eternity. The philosophical reflections are interrupted by the fiercely polemical essay 'Lord Howe's Wicked Dream', in which Tallis exposes the 'institutionally corrupt' deception intended to destroy the NHS.

    • Literary essays
      February 2000

      Meyer Berger's New York

      by Meyer Berger, Introduction by Pete Hamill

      Meyer ("Mike") Berger was one of the greatest journalists of this century. A reporter and columnist for The New York Times for thirty years, he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1950 for his account of the murder of thirteen people by a deranged war veteran in Camden, New Jersey. Berger is best known for his "About New York" column, which appeared regularly in the Times from 1939 to 1940 and from 1953 until his death in 1959. Through lovingly detailed snapshots of ordinary New Yorkers and far corners of the city, Berger's writing deeply influenced the next generation of writers, including Gay Talese and Tom Wolfe. Originally published in 1960 and long out of print, Meyer Berger's New York is a rich collection of extraordinary journalism, selected by Berger himself, which captures the buzz, bravado, and heartbreak of New York in the fifties in the words of the best-loved reporter of his time.

    • Literary essays
      January 2006

      The Exorbitant

      Emmanuel Levinas Between Jews and Christians

      by Edited by Kevin Hart, and Michael A. Signer

    • Literary essays
      December 1995

      A Reformation Debate

      John Calvin & Jacopo Sadoleto

      by John C. Olin

    • Literary essays
      February 1999

      Fighting Fascism in Europe

      The World War II Letters of an American Veteran of the Spanish Civil War

      by Lawrence Cane

      On his first day in basic training in 1942, Lawrence Cane wrote to his wife Grace from Fort Dix, New Jersey. "I'm in the army now - really!", he wrote, complaining, "I don't have enough time to write a decent letter".;Three years later, Captain Lawrence Cane went home from World War II. He'd landed at Utah Beach on D-Day, helped liberate France and Belgium, and survived the Battle of the Bulge. He won a Silver Star for bravery. And he still managed to write 300 letters home to Grace. This book is a different kind of war story - both a powerful chronicle of life in battle and a unique portrait of courage fuelled by a life-long passion for political justice.;Cane's fight for freedom began well before D-Day. In 1937, he joined the Abraham Lincoln Battalion and got wounded fighting for democracy in Spain. In 1942, at age 30, he enlisted in the new war against fascism, and as an officer with the 238th Combat Engineer Battalion, went ashore in Normandy to clear mines, destroy fortifications and open roads from Normandy to the Siegfried Line. Of the 400 Spanish Civil War veterans in World War II, Cane was the only one to go ashore on D-Day.;After the war, Lawrence Cane fought for civil rights and peace until his death in 1976. Discovered in 1995 by Cane's son David, his letters are not only classic accounts of war and unforgettable expressions of love for family, they are the fiercely patriotic words of a left-wing, working class, New York Jew (and one-time Communist Party member) who knew exactly why we fought - to create a better world by destroying all forms of fascism, one battle at a time.;With an introduction by David Cane, detailed notes, and much additional material, these letters add a new dimension to the meaning of American patriotism and a valuable chapter to the history of "the greatest generation".

    • Literary essays
      February 2000

      Meyer Berger's New York

      by Meyer Berger, Introduction by Pete Hamill

      Meyer ("Mike") Berger was one of the greatest journalists of this century. As a reporter and columnist for the New York Times for thirty years, he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1950 for his account of the murder of thirteen people by a deranged war veteran in Camden, New Jersey. Berger is best known for his "About New York" column that appeared regularly in the Times from 1939 to 1940 and from 1953 until his death in 1959. In lovingly detailed snapshots of ordinary New Yorkers and far corners of the city, Berger's writing deeply influenced the next generation of writers, including Gay Talese and Tom Wolfe. Originally published in 1960 and long out-of print, Meyer Berger's New York is a rich collection of extraordinary journalism, selected by Berger himself, that captures the buzz, bravado, and heartbreak of New York in the fifties by the best-loved reporter of his time.

    • Prose: non-fiction
      December 2003

      Experimenting

      Essays with Samuel Weber

      by Edited by Simon Morgan Wortham, and Gary Hall

    • Biography: general
      April 2003

      A Philadelphia Perspective

      The Civil War Diary of Sidney George Fisher

      by Sidney George Fisher, Edited and with a new introduction by Jonathan White

    • Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)

      Ysgrifau Yr Hanner Bardd

      by Dafydd Rowlands

    • Prose: non-fiction

      Stepping Twice Into the River

      Following Dakota Waters

      by Robert King

      In Stepping Twice Into the River, Robert King recounts his exploration of the 'almost unnoticeable' along North Dakota's Sheyenne River, from its headwaters to river's end. With every experience along the way -- tracing a military campaign, canoeing the river, visiting a ghost town and even trying to sleep in an ancient Cheyenne village -- King delves deeper into the river's culture. Each stop in his travels, each chapter of his writing, brings to light a different aspect of the plains, focusing on Native American culture, pioneer society, religion, war, agriculture, and nature. In the hands of this gifted thinker and writer, local facts yield universal metaphor. An able guide, King illuminates the ordinary from the perspectives of history, science, and literature. Blending travel narrative, interesting details, and poetic reflection, Stepping Twice Into the River takes readers on a journey through time, revealing both stability and change and offering prairie wisdom. Readers will find in Robert King an affable and delightful guide, a painter of a vivid portrait of human endeavour on the northern plains.

    • Literary essays

      Portage Pathways

      by Loris Troyer (author)

      As editor and executive editor of the Ravenna-Kent Record-Courier, Loris C. Troyer has been a pivotal figure in Portage County, Ohio, for over sixty years. Since retiring, he has written a weekly historical column entitled “Portage Pathways” on topics ranging from historical landmarks and events to eminent or interesting people to politics, society, and the value of recording local history. This book collects over 140 of his most memorable essays, illustrated with historical photographs.Troyer joined the Record-Courier staff as a reporter in 1936. In 1940 he reported that the federal government was secretly acquiring land east of Ravenna. That land was later used to build a 22,000-acre arsenal which became Portage County's biggest employer during periods of high activity and provided ammunition during World War II, the Korean War, and the war in Vietnam. Himself a graduate of Kent State University, Troyer reported university developments from the 1930s, when only a few hundred students were enrolled, to the 1990s, with the multi-campus complex serving over 25,000 students. As editor at the time of the May 4, 1970, shootings, he provided leadership as the paper struggled to explain the incident and its aftermath.Troyer's work has put him in contact with thousands of individuals who helped shape Portage County over much of the twentieth century, and his column is one of the best-read features of the Record-Courier. His years of acquired knowledge, steady perspective, and sense of humor are apparent in these essays.

    • Literary essays

      Ohio States

      A Twentieth-Century Midwestern

      by Jeffrey Hammond (author)

      With gentle humor, Hammond presents readers with the charms, aggravations, quirks, and disappointments of small-town life and frustrates any expectation that the past's deepest lessons are simple. In Ohio States: A Twentieth-Century Midwestern, Jeffrey Hammond asserts the quiet mysteries of an ordinary life. More than simply a glimpse of lie in the Midwest in the 1950s, this collection of well-crafted, touching narratives finds the author recalling his childhood and youth with a mixture of affection and alarm. Jeffrey Hammond is the George B. and Willma Reeves Distinguished Professor in the Liberal Arts and professor of English at St. Mary’s College in Maryland. He has published Small Comforts: Essays at Middle Age (Kent State University Press, 2008) as well as numerous prize-winning essays in magazines and literary journals.

    • Literary essays

      West of the Cuyahoga

      The Political Autobiography of Ohio House Speaker Vern Riffe

      by George Condon (author)

      A narrative history of Cleveland's West Side“In the beginning, two settlements straddled the Cuyahoga River at its northernmost reach, where it twists its way into Lake Erie. The older and larger of the two, Cleveland, was on the east bank. The younger community on the west bank was called Brooklyn Township, later to be known as the City of Ohio or, familiarly, Ohio City, and, ultimately, the West Side. The twain faced each other as rival entities for many years, divided not only by the waters of the river but by political, historical, and economic differences as well.” —from West of the CuyahogaLongtime columnist for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, George E. Condon turns his keen reportorial eye to Cleveland’s West Side, an area rich in history but too often overlooked in scholarly texts. In easy, polished prose, Condon regales the reader with stories of settlement, migration, and development, all the while bringing to life such characters as “Ice Wagon” Kilbane, whose legendary punch laid many West Side Irishmen low, and “Six O’Clock” Dorsey, said to have been the skinniest kid in the Old Angle neighborhood, and “Needles” McCafferty, who took his dinkey trolley sightseeing one memorable night.This seasoned newspaperman has been soaking up stray facts and vanishing information for more than five decades. Condon’s voracious appetite for facts and a nose for where to find them bring alive this Cleveland history, engaging the reader with his authentic stories, humorous anecdotes, and fond perspective.West of the Cuyahoga fills a gap in the history of Cleveland, Ohio, and reveals the gleanings of a lifetime for a local journalist and raconteur.

    • Prose: non-fiction

      The Great Persuader

      The Biography of Collis P. Huntington

      by David Lavender

      ollis Huntington Holladay of San Marino, California, made available documents and letters written by his great uncle. They are cited in the Notes as 'Holladay Collection'. The letters sent by Collis Huntington to his brother Solon during the gold-rush period and the subsequent years in Sacramento, form a significant part of the Holladay collection and were particularly valuable in allowing a reconstruction of a hitherto little known period of Collis' life. This book includes lavish and fascinating detail, emphasising in particular the complex, often illegal, financial and political wirepulling that generally won the day for Huntington.

    • Literary essays

      Paperwork

      Selected Prose

      by David Citino (author)

      David J. Citino’s Paperwork is a collection of previously published essays, pieces of memoir, and poetry set within the borders of Ohio. A native of Cleveland, Citino has lived in Ohio all his life.Citino’s prose casts light on his poetry, and his poetry helps the reader understand his prose. The whole becomes a meditation on thirty years of serious writing and reading by someone very much the product of his environment. Citino’s work attempts to show the impact and relevance that poetry and prose can have on an individual and makes a case for poetry from his own perspective.

    • Prose: non-fiction

      Sites of Insight

      A Guide to Colorado Sacred Places

      by James Lough , Christie Smith

      In these eighteen illuminating essays, some of Colorado's most accomplished novelists, essayists, and poets write in intimate detail about their most poignant experiences in the Colorado wilderness. Readers are given access -- both physically and spiritually -- to settings that inspire reverence for and contemplation about one's relationship to the land. From above tree line in the Rawah Mountains down into the broad San Luis Valley, from the Western Slope to the high plains in the east, the reader is taken on a vivid journey through a rich assortment of Colorado's awe-inspiring landscapes. The book belongs on the bookshelves of tourists, outdoor enthusiasts, and Coloradoans -- both long-time residents and newcomers -- who seek to apprehend something in nature that is larger than themselves.

    • Biography: general

      Hen Dòy Ffarm

      The Old Farmhouse

      by D.J. Williams

    • Children's & young adult fiction & true stories

      Gwas Y Stabl

      by Mair Wynn Hughes

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