• Literary theory
      January 2018

      Postfeminism

      Cultural Texts and Theories

      by Stéphanie Genz, Benjamin A. Brabon

      Essential reading for those seeking a thorough and wide-ranging understanding of postfeminism This text comprehensively surveys and critically positions the main issues, theories and contemporary debates surrounding postfeminism. It covers the term’s underpinnings and critical contexts, its different meanings, as well as popular media representations. New for this edition: Extended critical history of postfeminism Engagement with a new postfeminist vocabulary associated with post-recession Close analysis of the impact of a recessionary postfeminist stance Adopting an inclusive and interdisciplinary approach, the text situates postfeminism in relation to earlier feminisms and addresses its manifestations in popular culture, academia, politics and brand culture. It brings to light the various meanings of postfeminism and highlights distinct postfeminist patterns, while opening up the category for future investigation. Key Features User-friendly format allows students and lecturers to explore the diverse postfeminist landscape as well as examine specific versions of it An original and rigorous critical approach to the topic that advances a contextualized understanding of postfeminism Detailed analysis in chapters on the Backlash, New Traditionalism and Austerity Nostalgia, New Feminism, Girl Power and Chick-lit, Do-Me Feminism and Raunch Culture, (Neo)liberal Sexism, Postmodern Feminism, Postcolonial Feminism, Queer Feminism, Men and Feminism, Cyberfeminism, Third Wave Feminism, Sexual Micro-/Macro-Politics, Celebrity Brand Culture Includes topical case studies on (amongst others) Game of Thrones, Keeping Up with the Kardashians, Lady Gaga, Girls, Nicki Minaj, Slut Walk, FEMEN ; This text comprehensively surveys and critically positions the main issues, theories and contemporary debates surrounding postfeminism. ; Introduction; 1. Postfeminist Contexts; Postfeminist Texts and Theories; 2. Backlash, New Traditionalism and Austerity-Nostalgia; 3. New Feminism: Victim vs. Power; 4. Girl Power and Chick Lit; 5. Do-Me Feminism and Raunch Culture; 6. Liberal Sexism; 7. Postmodern (Post)Feminism; 8. Queer (Post)Feminism; 9. Men and Postfeminism; 10. Cyber-Postfeminism; 11. Third Wave Feminism; 12. Micro/Macro-Politics and Enterprise Culture; 13. Postfeminist Brand Culture and Celebrity Authenticity; Bibliography.

    • Literary studies: from c 1900 -
      July 2017

      On the Margins of Modernism

      Xu Xu, Wumingshi and Popular Chinese Literature in the 1940s

      by Christopher Rosenmeier

      Xu Xu and Wumingshi were among the most widely read authors in China during and after the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945), but although they were an integral part of the Chinese literary scene their bestselling fiction has been given scant attention in histories of Chinese writing. This groundbreaking book, the first study of Xu Xu and Wumingshi in English or any other western language, re-establishes their importance within the popular Chinese literature of the 1940s. With in-depth analyses of their innovative short stories and novels, Christopher Rosenmeier demonstrates how these important writers incorporated and adapted narrative techniques from Shanghai modernist writers like Shi Zhecun and Mu Shiying, contesting the view that modernism had little lasting impact in China and firmly positioning these two figures within the literature of their times. ; Xu Xu and Wumingshi were among the most widely read authors in China during and after the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945). This groundbreaking book re-establishes their importance within the popular Chinese literature of the 1940s with in-depth analyses of their innovative short stories and novels.

    • Literary theory
      July 2017

      New Critical Thinking

      Criticism to Come

      by Julian Wolfreys

      Introduces advanced students of literature to the latest critical thinking Following a scene-setting Introduction which reflects on the state of ‘theory’ today, the 11 chapters in this volume introduce new areas of critical thinking which go beyond the standard ‘isms’: Literary Reading in a Digital Age; Critical Making in the Digital Humanities; Thing Theory; Memory Work and Criticism; Body, Objects, Technology; Criticism and ‘The Animal’; Multimodality and Linguistic Approaches to Literary Study; Critical and Creative Practice: Conditions for Success in the Writing Workshop; Affect Theory; Spectrality; Critical Climate Change. A final rounding off chapter on Historicising presents debates around historically oriented criticism, including a ‘round table’ among the contributors. Each chapter also provides a critical ‘case study’ of a text or texts, including poetry writing guides, a Seamus Heaney poem, film adaptations of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, e-readers and kindles, First World War poetry and prose, steampunk, and Robert Macfarlane’s The Old Ways. From ‘Thing Theory’ to animal theory, multimodality to film adaptation, and from acts of reading in a digital age to the creative writing workshop, the volume reflects a radical reorientation in critical modes of thinking. Key Features: Presents cutting-edge debates presented to more advanced students in an engaging yet sophisticated way Provides a wide range of ‘case studies’ including poetry, film, reading devices, popular fiction & non-fiction prose Reflects newly emerging ways of teaching critical ideas in the classroom Opens criticism to dialogue and possibility ; From ‘Thing Theory’ to animal theory, multimodality to film adaptation, and from acts of reading in a digital age to the creative writing workshop, the volume reflects a radical reorientation in critical modes of thinking. ; Introduction: New Critical Thinking, to Read so as to Become Acquainted, Julian Wolfreys; 1. Turnings and Re-Turnings, Mary Ann Caws; 2. ‘Peering into the dark machinery’: Modernity, Perception, and the Self in John Burnside’s Poetry, Monika Szuba; 3. Modernity’s Sylvan Subjectivity, from Gainsborough to Gallaccio, Catherine Bernard; 4. Little Did They Know: Toward an Experiential Approach, Sarah Pardon; 5. ‘The Heart cannot forget / Unless it contemplates / What it declines’: Emily Dickinson, Frank Ankersmit, and the Art of Forgetting, Páraic Finnerty; 6. Reading Microhistory: Three Layers of Meaning, Anton Froeyman; 7. Writing Fiction, Making History: Historical Narrative and the Process of Creating History, Christine Berberich; 8. Witnessing, Recognition, and Response Ethics, Kelly Oliver; 9. A Norwegian Abroad: Camilla Collett’s Travelogues from Berlin to Paris, Tone Selboe; 10. Alfred Jarry’s Nietzschean Modernism, Jean-Michel Rabaté; 11. On First Looking into Derrida’s Glas, J. Hillis Miller; 12. ‘A very black and little Arab Jew’: Experience and Experimentation or, Two Words for Jacques Derrida, Julian Wolfreys.

    • Literary studies: general
      February 2017

      The Contemporary British Novel Since 2000

      by James Acheson

      Focuses on the novels published since 2000 by twenty major British novelists The Contemporary British Novel Since 2000 is in five parts, with the first part examining the work of four particularly well-known and highly regarded twenty-first century writers: Ian McEwan, David Mitchell, Hilary Mantel and Zadie Smith. It is with reference to each of these novelists in turn that the terms ‘realist’, ‘postmodernist’, ‘historical’ and ‘postcolonialist’ fiction are introduced, while in the remaining four parts, other novelists are discussed and the meaning of the terms amplified. From the start it is emphasised that these terms and others often mean different things to different novelists, and that the complexity of their novels often obliges us to discuss their work with reference to more than one of the terms. Also discusses the works of: Maggie O’Farrell, Sarah Hall, A.L. Kennedy, Alan Warner, Ali Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Kate Atkinson, Salman Rushdie, Adam Foulds, Sarah Waters, James Robertson, Mohsin Hamid, Andrea Levy, and Aminatta Forna. ; The Contemporary British Novel Since 2000 examines 20 key novelists as well as introducing and applying the terms ‘realist’, ‘postmodernist’, ‘historical’ and ‘postcolonialist’ against them. ; Introduction, James Acheson; Part I: Four Voices for the New Millennium; 1. Ian McEwan: Lies and Deceptions, David Punter; 2. David Mitchell: Global Novelist of the Twenty-First Century, Brian Finney; 3. Hilary Mantel: Raising the Dead, Speaking the Truth, Lisa Fletcher; 4. Zadie Smith: The Geographies of Marriage, Gretchen Gerzina; Part II: Realism and Beyond; 5. Maggie O’Farrell: Discoveries at the Edge, Susan Strehle; 6. Sarah Hall: A New Kind of Story-Telling, Sue Vice; 7. A.L. Kennedy: Giving and Receiving, Alison Lumsden; 8. Alan Warner: Timeless Realities, Alan Riach; Part III: Postmodernism, Globalisation and Beyond; 9. Ali Smith: Strangers and Intrusions, Monica Germanà; 10. Kazuo Ishiguro: Alternate Histories, Daniel Bedggood; 11. Kate Atkinson: Plotting to Be Read, Glenda Norquay; 12. Salman Rushdie: Archival Modernism, Vijay Mishra; Part IV: Realism, Postmodernism and Beyond: Historical Fiction; 13. Adam Foulds: Fictions of Past and Present, Dominic Head; 14. Sarah Waters: Representing Marginal Groups and Individuals, Susana Onega; 15. James Robertson: In the Margins of History, Cairns Craig; Part V: Postcolonialism and Beyond; 16. Mohsin Hamid: The Transnational Novel of Globalisation, Janet Wilson; 17. Andrea Levy: The SS Empire Windrush and After, Sue Thomas; 18. Aminatta Forna: Truth, Trauma, Memory, Françoise Lionnet and Jennifer MacGregor.

    • Literary studies: general
      February 2018

      Key Concepts in the Gothic

      by William Hughes

      An essential quick-reference book for students of Gothic literature, theatre and literary theory Key Concepts in the Gothic provides a one-stop resource which details and defines, in accessible language, those contexts essential for the study of the Gothic in all periods and media. The volume is divided into three sections: Concepts and Terms; Theories of the Gothic; and Key Fictional Texts. Bibliographies are provided with the last two sections. The book clearly explains the critical terms – from ‘Ab-human’ to ‘Zombie’ – as well as the main theories, including ecocriticism, queer theory and Postcolonial theory, which any student of the Gothic is likely to encounter. This book will be a reliable companion for students of the genre from school and through university. Key Features Covers the Gothic from the eighteenth century to the present Provides a comprehensive survey not just of movements and theories but also of the essential terminology used in Gothic Studies A reference work for those working with genres inflected by the Gothic, such as Romanticism, theatre studies and crime writing Provides a readily accessible resource for developing further research ; Key Concepts in the Gothic provides a one-stop resource which details and defines, in accessible language, those contexts essential for the study of the Gothic in all periods and media. ; Introduction; Concepts and Terms; Theories of Gothic; Fifteen Key Fictional Texts.

    • Anthologies (non-poetry)
      March 2016

      An Anthology of Arabic Literature

      From the Classical to the Modern

      by Tarif Khalidi

      Introducing readers to the extremely rich tradition of Arabic literature, this Anthology covers some of its major themes and concerns across the centuries, from its early beginnings to modern times. The texts chosen are a 'library of personal preferences' of a scholar who has spent half a century or more in the company of Arabic books, marking then translating those passages that seemed to him to capture some of its most memorable moments. Reflecting the great diversity and unpredictability of Arabic literature as the carrier of a major world culture, both pre-modern and modern, the Anthology is divided thematically to highlight modern issues such as love, religion, the human self, human rights, freedom of expression, the environment, violence, secular thought, and feminism. The short, easy-to-read texts are accessible to non-specialists, providing an ideal entry point to this extraordinary literature. ; Introducing readers to the extremely rich tradition of Arabic literature, this Anthology covers some of its major themes and concerns across the centuries, from its early beginnings to modern times. ; Introduction; Acknowledgments; Part 1. Pre-Modern Texts; Section One. Poetry; Mock-heroic; 1. The Poet and the Wolf, Al-Buhturi (d.897); 2. A love and wine song, Tamim ibn al-Mu`izz al-Fatimi (10th cent); 3. Elegy for a drinking companion, `Abdullah ibn al-Mu`tazz (d.908); Bedouin chivalry; 4. A bedouin and his guest, Al-Hutay’ah (d.ca.661); Frivolous love; 5. A girl called Hind, `Umar ibn Abi Rabi`a (d.711); Melancholy; 6. A rain cloud, Abu al-`Ala’ al-Ma`arri (d.1057); Heretical verse; 7. Belief and Unbelief, Abu al-`Ala’ al-Ma`arri; Elegy: One; 8. A poetess mourns her brother, al-Fari`ah (d. ca. 800); 9. Elegy for the celebrated Wazir, Nizam al-Mulk (d.1092); Anonymous; 10. Elegy for a friend, Abu’l `Ala’ al-Ma`arri (d.1057); Humour; 11. Grey Hairs, Abu `Ali al-Hasan ibn `Abdullah (d.1001); Poets and their daughters; 12. A poet to his daughter; Anonymous; 13. A dying poet to his daughter, Abu Firas al-Hamdani, (d.968); Elegy: Two; 14. Elegy for the fall of al-Andalus (Muslim Spain), Abu’l Baqa’ al-Rundi (d.1285); 15. Elegy for the wazir Ibn Baqiyya, Abu’l Hasan al-Anbari (d. 10th cent.); Elegy: Humorous; 16. Elegy for a tom-cat, Ibn al-`Allaf (d.930); 17. Elegy for an extracted molar tooth, Al-Babi (d.?); Exile; 18. A poet dying in exile, Ibn Zurayq al-Baghdadi (d. 1029); Imagery; 19. A woman bathing, Abu Nuwas (d.814); Poetic fragments: One; 20. On nature and natural object by diverse poets; (i) The crescent moon; (ii) The new moon in daytime; (iii) The full moon behind clouds; (iv) The moon shining upon water; (v) The moon amidst stars; (vi) The stars; (vii)The Pleiades; (viii) Gemini; (ix) Mars; (x) Vega; (xi) Vega, Altair and Pisces; (xii) Ursa Major; (xiii) Pitch-black night; (xiv) Dawn; (xv) The rainbow; (xvi) Midday heat; (xvii) Extreme cold; (xviii) A day both bright and cloudy; (xix) Shadows cast by tree leaves; (xx) The rose and the daffodil; (xxi) Red Anemone; (xxii) Wallflower; (xxiii) The Judas tree; Poetic fragments: Two; 21. On the joys and agonies of love by diverse poets; Love and seduction; 22. A poet defends his seduction of a young and innocent girl; Bashshar ibn Burd (d.783); Section Two: Prose; Jahiz; 23. On authors and authorship; 24. Advice to public speakers (1); 25. Advice to public speakers (2); 26. The power of suggestion; Animal fables; 27. The lion, the wolf, the raven, the jackal and the camel, Ibn al-Muqaffa` (d.756) 28. The flea and the mosquito, Baha’ al-Din al-`Amili (d. 1621); Snappy Answers; 29. A Selection of Al-Ajuriba al-Muskita; Heretics; 30. On Ibn al-Shalmaghani, his execution and a brief mention of his heretical views, Abu’l Fida (d.1331); 31. The death of Abu Talib al-Makki, the famous mystic, Abu’l Fida; 32. Rival Qur’ans, Abu’l Husayn al-Haruni al-Zaydi (d.1030); 33. Last will and testament, Imam al-Haramayn al-Juwayni (d.1085); Psychology; 34. Psychology of Old Age, Fakhr al-din al-Razi (d.1209); 35. Education of the young, Ghazali (d.1111); 36. Firasa (physiognomy), Fakhr al-din al-Razi (d.1209); Foreign Lands; 37. England, Ibn Sa`id al-Maghribi (d.1286); 38. The Land of the Franks, Zakariyya ibn Muhammad al-Qazwini (d.1283); 39. Ireland, Qazwini; 40. A medieval Lilliput, Qazwini; 41. The Emperor Frederick II (d. 1250) tricks his rivals, Ibn Wasil (d.1298); 42. Propaganda during the Third Crusade, 1190, Abu Shama (d. 1268); 43. A Byzantine emperor’s finery, Al-Qadi al-Rashid ibn al-Zubayr (d. late 11th cent.); 44. Diplomacy: Embassy of Queen Bertha daughter of Lothar, Al-Qadi al-Rashid ibn al-Zubayr; Literary Anecdote; 45. A lesson in generosity, Ibn Khallikan (d.1282); 46. A brilliant judge Ibn `Asakir (d. 1175); 47. Poetic justice: revenge, Ghars al-Ni`mah al-Sabi (d.1087); 48. A clown at a Caliph’s court, Al-Sharishi (d.1222); 49. A classic children’s story: Tanburi’s shoe, Anonymous; 50. Three real-life stories on the theme of “Ease following hardship”, Ahmad ibn Yusuf Ibn al-Daya (d. ca. 942); 51. Pre-Islamic Arabian lore, Ibn Habib (d.859); 52. What kings must avoid, Ibn al-Tiqtaqa (d. after 1302); Argument; 53. Theology as defined by a philosopher, Farabi (d.950); 54. On marvels and oddities of nature (excerpts), Mas`udi (d.956); 55. Can a woman be a prophet?, Ibn Hazm (d.1064); 56. Paradise is a bore, Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi (d. ca.1010); 57. What is laughter?, Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi; 58. A division of existents, Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi; 59. An humorous exchange on the subject of miserliness, Ibn Qutayba (d.889); 60. An argument over date wine, Al-Zajjaji (d.951); 61. The symptoms of love, Ibn Hazm (d.1064); Sexuality; 62. Sexual manners, Ghazali (d.1111); Reflections on history; 63. Civilizations and religious beliefs, Jahiz; 64. Were the ancients taller and longer-lived than us?, Mas`udi (d.956); 65. Dismissing a vizier, Ibn al-Athir (d.1232); 66. Biographers and biography, Al-Subki (d.1369); 67. Dynastic transitions, Ibn al-Athir (d. 1232); 68. The Mongol Invasions, Ibn al-Athir; 69. The Caliph `Uthman and the First Civil War in Islamic history, Ibn Khaldun (d.1404); 70. Arab history comes round full circle, Ibn Khaldun (d.1404); 71. Causes of the decline of states, Turtushi (d. 1126); 72. Military feudalism in Andalusia, Turtushi; 73. Religions and policies of ancient nations, Turtushi; 74. Are the conquests of Alexander the Great credible as reported?, Yaqut (d.1229); History: direct witness; 75. The death of Saladin, 1193, Abu Shama (d. 1268); 76. Ibn Khaldun and Tamerlane: The great world historian meets the great world conqueror, 1401, Ibn Khaldun (d.1406); Society; 77. Arts and crafts in cities (excerpts), Rasa’il Ikhwan al-Safa (“Epistles of the Pure Brethren”) (ca.10-11th cent.); Sufism (Islamic mysticism); 78. Sufi sayings and stories, Abu `Abd al-Rahman al-Sulami (d.1021); 79. Licit and illicit as colors: a Sufi view, Abu Talib al-Makki (d. 996); 80. Sufi solitude, Ghazali; 81. How Satan enters the human heart, Ghazali; Proverbs and aphorisms; 82. Proverbs popular among the common people of Baghdad in the tenth century, Al-Abi (d.1030); Literary judgments; 83. The celebrated poet al-Farazdaq (d.728) to a man who showed him his inferior verse, Abu Zayd al-Qurashi (d. early 10th cent); 84. The famous critic al-Asma`i (d. 828) on poetry, Al-Marzubani (d.994); 85. On verse and prose, Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi (d. ca.1010); 86. The introduction to a famous literary anthology, Ibn Qutayba (d.889); 87. The famous poet Abu Tamman on his verse, Muhammad ibn Yahya al-Suli (d. 946); 88. When can a simile be considered truly remarkable?, `Abd al-Qahir al-Jurjani (d.1078); Reflections on the state; 89. The democratic city-state, Farabi (d. 950); 90. Inaugural address by the Umayyad caliph Yazid III, a “democratic” caliph, Ibn Hamdun; Polemic; 91. Christian Arabic Polemics against Islam, `Abd al-Masih al-Kindi, (ca. beginning of 10th cent.); 92. Debates with Jews and Christians, Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya (d. 1350); Jesus; 93. Passages on Jesus in the Qur’an Commentary (Tafsir) of Tabari (d. 923); (i) His birth; (ii) Jesus speaks in his cradle; (iii) The livelihood of Jesus; (iv) The Crucifixion of Jesus; (v) The death and ascension of Jesus; Wisdom Literature; 94. A famous scholar describes how he spends his days, Ibn `Abd al-Barr (d.1070); 95. Sayings of the Prophet Muhammad; 96. Sayings of `Ali ibn Abi Talib; 97. Sundry wisdom sayings; Part Two: Modern Texts; Section One; Political protest; 98. 3 popular political songs, Ahmad Fu’ad Najm (d. 2013); 99. Two poems, Muhammad al-Maghut (d. 2006); Heretics; 100. A poet’s heretical credo, Ma`ruf al-Rusafi (d. 1945); Jesus; 101. Christ after the Crucifixion, Badr Shakir al-Sayyab (d. 1964); Elegy; 102. Elegy for a woman, Nazik al-Mala’iki (d. 2007); 103. It’s time this heart withdraws, Ahlam Mistghanmi (b. 1953); 104. To devotees of bull fighting, Ahlam Mistghanmi; Section Two: Prose; Popular Historiography; 105. A Damascene barber records the life around him, Al-Budayri al-Hallaq (d. after 1762); Short Stories; 106. A child’s secret, Fu’ad al-Tikirli; 107. Three short stories, Zakariyya Tamir (b. 1931); Feminism; 108. Early modern feminism, May Ziadeh (d.1941); 109. Two autobiographical accounts, `Anbara Salam al-Khalidi (d.1986); Personal Experience; 110. An Egyptian Muslim cleric defrocks (ca. 1927), Ahmad Amin; 111. An encounter with George Bernard Shaw (ca.1910), Salama Musa (d. 1958); Humor; 112. The Fat Person, Sa`id Taqyiddin (d.1960); Jesus; 113. Christ: a modern Muslim view, `Abbas Mahmud al-`Aqqad, (d. 1964); Personal Experiences of War; 114. Scenes from the First World War (Palestine), Khalil al-Sakakini (1878-1953); 115. Scenes from the First World War (Lebanon), `Anbara Salam al-Khalidi (d. 1986), `Ajjaj Nuwayhid (d.1982), Yusuf al-Hakim (d. 1979); 116. The Versailles Peace Conference: An Arab perspective, Rustum Haidar (d.1940); 117. Two encounters with Anatole France, Rustum Haidar; Heretics; 118. Fanaticism, Ma`ruf al-Rusafi (d. 1945); Foreign lands; 119. England in the 1840s, Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq (d.1887); (i) A village in Cambridgeshire; (ii) English social classes; (iii) Oxford and Cambridge; (iv) Praiseworthy English customs; (v) English marriage customs; (vi) English children’s upbringing; (vii) English Table-manners; (viii) English and French prostitutes; Political Writings: Editorials; 120. Who owns the “weapon” of democracy?, Joseph Samaha (d.2010); 121. Hatred of America, Joseph Samaha; 122. Modern Syria’s literary and national renaissance, Antun Saadeh (d. 1949); 123. A Marxist analysis of the term “Civilization”, Mahdi `Amil (d. 1987); Muslim Law; 124. A modern Muslim jurist on punishments in Muslim sacred law, `Abdullah al-`Alayli; Aphorisms for our times; 125. Aphorisms for our times, Ibrahim al-Kuni (b.1948); Sources; Index. ; Acknowledgements Introduction PART I PRE-MODERN TEXTS SECTION I POETRY Mock-heroic 1. The poet and the wolf Al-Buhturi (d. 897) 2. A love and wine song Tamim ibn al-Muʿizz al-Fatimi (d. 984) 3. Elegy for a drinking companion ʿAbdullah ibn al-Muʿtazz (d. 908) Bedouin chivalry 4. A Bedouin and his guest Al-Hutayʾah (d. c. 661) Frivolous love 5. A girl called Hind ʿUmar ibn Abi Rabiʿa (d. 711) Melancholy 6. A rain cloud Abu al-ʿAlaʾ al-Maʿarri (d. 1057) Heretical verse 7. Faith and unbelief Abu al-ʿAlaʾ al-Maʿarri Elegies I 8. A poetess mourns her brother Al-Fariʿah (d. c. 800) 9. Elegy for the celebrated vizier Nizam al-Mulk Muqatil ibn ʿAtiyya (d. c. 1111) 10. Elegy for a friend Abu al-ʿAlaʾ al-Maʿarri Humour 11. Grey hairs Abu ʿAli al-Hasan ibn ʿAbdullah (d. c. 1001) Poets and their daughters 12. A poet to his daughter Anonymous 13. A dying poet to his daughter Abu Firas al-Hamdani (d. 968) Elegies II 14. Elegy for the fall of al-Andalus (Muslim Spain) Abuʾl Baqaʾ al-Rundi (d. 1285) 15. Elegy for the vizier Ibn Baqiyya, killed then crucified in 978 Abuʾl Hasan al-Anbari (d. 10th century) Elegies III: humorous 16. Elegy for a tomcat Abu Bakr ibn al-ʿAllaf (d. 930) 17. Elegy for an extracted molar tooth Al-Babi (d. 1681) Exile 18. A poet dying in exile Ibn Zurayq al-Baghdadi (d. 1029) Imagery 19. A woman bathing Abu Nuwas (d. 814) Poetic fragments by various poets 20. On nature and natural objects (i) The crescent moon (ii) The new moon in daytime (iii) The full moon behind clouds (iv) The moon shining upon water (v) The moon amid stars (vi) The stars (vii) The Pleiades (viii) Gemini (ix) Mars (x) Vega (xi) Vega, Altair and Pisces (xii) Ursa Major (xiii) Pitch-black night (xiv) Dawn (xv) A rainbow (xvi) Midday heat (xvii) Extreme cold (xviii) A day both bright and cloudy (xix) Shadows cast by leaves (xx) The rose and the daffodil (xxi) A red anemone (xxii) Wallflowers (xxiii) The Judas tree 21. On the joys and agonies of love Seduction 22. A poet defends his seduction of a young and innocent girl Bashshar ibn Burd (d. 784) SECTION II PROSE Jahiz 23. On authors and authorship 24. Advice to public speakers I 25. Advice to public speakers II 26. The power of suggestion Animal fables 27. The lion, the wolf, the raven, the jackal and the camel Ibn al-Muqaffaʿ (d. 756) 28. The flea and the mosquito Bahaʾ al-Din al-ʿAmili (d. 1621) Snappy answers 29. Al-Ajwiba al-muskita Heretics 30. On Ibn al-Shalmaghani, his execution and a brief mention of his heretical views Abuʾl Fida (d. 1331) 31. On Abu Talib al-Makki, the famous mystic Abuʾl Fida 32. Rival Qurʾans Abuʾl Husayn al-Haruni al-Zaydi (d. 1030) 33. Last will and testament Imam al-Haramayn al-Juwayni (d. 1085) Psychology 34. The psychology of old age Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (d. 1209) 35. Education of the young Ghazali (d. 1111) 36. Firasa (physiognomy) Fakhr al-Din al-Razi Foreign lands 37. England Ibn Saʿid al-Maghribi (d. 1286) 38. The land of the Franks Zakariyya ibn Muhammad al-Qazwini (d. 1283) 39. Ireland Zakariyya ibn Muhammad al-Qazwini 40. A medieval Lilliput Zakariyya ibn Muhammad al-Qazwini 41. Emperor Frederick II (d. 1250) tricks his rivals Ibn Wasil (d. 1298) 42. Propaganda during the Third Crusade, 1190 Abu Shama (d. 1268) 43. A Byzantine emperor’s finery Al-Qadi al-Rashid ibn al-Zubayr (d. late 11th century) 44. Diplomacy: embassy of Queen Bertha, daughter of Lothar Al-Qadi al-Rashid ibn al-Zubayr Literary anecdotes 45. A lesson in generosity Ibn Khallikan (d. 1282) 46. A brilliant judge Ibn ʿAsakir (d. 1175), al-Safadi (d. 1363) 47. Poetic justice: revenge Ghars al-Niʿmah al-Sabi (d. 1087) 48. A clown at a caliph’s court Al-Sharishi (d. 1222) 49. A classic children’s story: Tanburi’s shoe Anonymous 50. Three real-life stories on the theme of ‘Ease following hardship’ Ahmad ibn Yusuf ibn al-Daya (d. c. 942) 51. Pre-Islamic Arabian lore 52. What kings must avoid Ibn al-Tiqtaqa (d. after 1302) Argument 53. Theology as defined by a philosopher Farabi (d. 950) 54. On marvels and oddities of nature Masʿudi (d. 956) 55. Can a woman be a prophet? Ibn Hazm (d. 1064) 56. Paradise is a bore Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi (d. c. 1010) 57. What is laughter? Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi 58. A division of existents Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi 59. A humorous exchange on the subject of miserliness Ibn Qutayba (d. 889) 60. An argument over date wine Al-Zajjaji (d. 951) 61. The symptoms of love Ibn Hazm Sexuality 62. Sexual manners Ghazali Reflections on history 63. Civilisations and religious beliefs Jahiz 64. Were the ancients taller and longer lived than us? Masʿudi 65. Dismissing a vizier Ibn al-Athir (d. 1232) 66. Biographers Al-Subki (d. 1370) 67. Dynastic transitions Ibn al-Athir 68. The Mongol invasions Ibn al-Athir 69. The caliph ʿUthman and the First Civil War in Islamic history Ibn Khaldun (d. 1406) 70. Arab history comes full circle Ibn Khaldun 71. Causes of the decline of states Turtushi (d. 1126) 72. Military feudalism in Andalusia Turtushi 73. Religions and policies of ancient nations Turtushi 74. Are the conquests of Alexander the Great credible as reported? Yaqut (d. 1229) History: direct witnesses 75. The death of Saladin, 1193 Abu Shama 76. Ibn Khaldun and Tamerlane: the great world historian meets the great world conqueror, 1401 Ibn Khaldun Society 77. Arts and crafts in cities Ikhwan al-Safaʾ (c. 10th–11th century) Sufism (Islamic mysticism) 78. Sufi sayings and stories Abu ʿAbd al-Rahman al-Sulami (d. 1021) 79. Licit and illicit as colours: a Sufi view Abu Talib al-Makki (d. 996) 80. Sufi solitude Ghazali 81. How Satan enters the human heart Ghazali Proverbs and aphorisms 82. Proverbs popular among the common people of Baghdad in the tenth century Al-Abi (d. 1030) Literary judgements 83. The celebrated poet al-Farazdaq (d. 728) to a man who showed him his inferior verse Abu Zayd al-Qurashi (d. early 10th century) 84. The famous critic al-Asmaʿi (d. 828) on poetry Al-Marzubani (d. 994) 85. On verse and prose Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi 86. The introduction to a famous literary anthology Ibn Qutayba (d. 889) 87. The famous poet Abu Tamman on his verse Muhammad ibn Yahya al-Suli (d. 946) 88. When can a simile be considered truly remarkable? ʿAbd al-Qahir al-Jurjani (d. 1078) Reflections on the state 89. The democratic city-state Farabi 90. Inaugural address by the Umayyad caliph Yazid III, a ‘democratic’ caliph Ibn Hamdun (d. 1166) Polemic 91. Christian Arabic polemics against Islam ʿAbd al-Masih al-Kindi (fl. early 10th century) 92. Debates with Jews and Christians Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya (d. 1350) Jesus 93. Passages on Jesus in the Qurʾan Commentary (Tafsir) of Tabari (i) Jesus’ birth (ii) Jesus speaks in his cradle (iii) The livelihood of Jesus (iv) The crucifixion of Jesus (v) The death and ascension of Jesus Wisdom literature 94. A famous scholar describes how he spends his days Ibn ʿAbd al-Barr (d. 1070) 95. Sayings of the Prophet Muhammad 96. Sayings of ʿAli ibn Abi Talib 97. Sundry wisdom sayings PART II MODERN TEXTS SECTION I POETRY Political protest 98. Three popular political songs Ahmad Fuʾad Najm (d. 2013) (i) The mawwal of ful and meat (ii) D’Estaing (iii) Mickey 99. Two poems Muhammad al-Maghut (d. 2006) (i) A frightened postman (ii) Fear Heretics 100. A poet’s heretical credo Maʿruf al-Rusafi (d. 1945) Jesus 101. Christ after the Crucifixion Badr Shakir al-Sayyab (d. 1964) Elegies 102. Elegy for a woman (Scenes from a Baghdad alley) Nazik al-Malaʾika (d. 2007) 103. It’s time this heart withdrew Ahlam Mistghanmi (b. 1953) 104. To devotees of bullfighting Ahlam Mistghanmi SECTION II PROSE Popular historiography 105. A Damascene barber records the life around him Al-Budayri al-Hallaq (d. after 1762) Short stories 106. A child’s secret Fuʾad al-Tikirli (d. 2008) 107. Three short stories Zakariyya Tamir (b. 1931) (i) ‘Good morning’ (ii) Burglars (iii) The eternal governor Feminism 108. A lecture given in Cairo in 1914 May Ziadeh (d. 1941) 109. Two autobiographical accounts ʿAnbara Salam al-Khalidi (d. 1986) (i) A girl dons the veil in Beirut in 1907 (ii) Twenty years later: the unveiling Personal experience 110. An Egyptian Muslim cleric defrocks (c. 1927) Ahmad Amin (d. 1954) 111. An encounter with George Bernard Shaw (c. 1910) Salama Musa (d. 1958) Humour 112. The fat person Saʿid Taqyiddin (d. 1960) Jesus 113. Christ: a modern Muslim view ʿAbbas Mahmud al-ʿAqqad (d. 1964) Personal experiences of war 114. Scenes from the First World War (Palestine) Khalil al-Sakakini (d. 1953) 115. Scenes from the First World War (Lebanon) (i) ʿAnbara Salam al-Khalidi (ii) ʿAjjaj Nuwayhid (iii) Yusuf al-Hakim 116. The Versailles Peace Conference (1919): an Arab perspective Rustum Haidar (d. 1940) 117. Two encounters with Anatole France (1844–1924) Rustum Haidar Heretics 118. Fanaticism Maʿruf al-Rusafi Foreign lands 119. England in the 1840s Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq (d. 1887) (i) A village in Cambridgeshire (ii) English social classes (iii) Cambridge and Oxford (iv) Praiseworthy English customs (v) English marriage customs (vi) English children’s upbringing (vii) English table manners (viii) English and French prostitutes Political writings: editorials 120. Who owns the ‘weapon’ of democracy? Joseph Samaha (d. 2010) 121. Hatred of America Joseph Samaha 122. Modern Syria’s literary and national renaissance Antun Saadeh (d. 1949) 123. A Marxist analysis of the term ‘civilisation’ Mahdi ʿAmil (d. 1987) Muslim law 124. A modern Muslim jurist on punishments in Muslim sacred law ʿAbdullah al-ʿAlayli (d. 1996) Aphorisms for our times 125. Aphorisms for our times Ibrahim al-Kuni (b. 1948) Sources Index of authors

    • Literary studies: general
      January 2017

      Key Concepts in Contemporary Popular Fiction

      by Bernice M. Murphy

      A jargon-free guide to the key terms, concepts, and theoretical approaches to contemporary popular fiction Key Concepts in Contemporary Popular Fiction represents an invaluable starting point for students wishing to familiarise themselves with this exciting and rapidly evolving area of literary studies. It provides an accessible, concise and reliable overview of core critical terminology, key theoretical approaches, and the major genres and sub-genres within popular fiction. Because popular fiction is significantly shaped by commercial forces, the book also provides critical and historical contexts for terminology related to e-books, e-publishing, and self-publishing platforms. By using focusing in particular on post-2000 trends in popular fiction, the book provides a truly up-to-date snapshot of the subject area and its critical contexts. Key Features Provides an engaging and knowledgeable overview of critical terminology and theoretical approaches used by critics working within the field Introduces readers to the most recent trends and newest terms, including ‘Nordic Noir’, ‘New Adult Fiction’, ‘Cli-Fi’ (Climate Change Fiction), ‘Mash-up’ and ‘Flash Fiction’ as well as significant terms related to fan fiction and web-publishing platforms such as WattPad Includes an annotated further reading list to crime; horror; romance; fantasy; Science Fiction and comic books/graphic novels Supplies a chronology, providing readers with a historical overview of the major popular novels, critical approaches, and technological innovations ; Key Concepts in Contemporary Popular Fiction r provides an accessible, concise and reliable overview of core critical terminology, key theoretical approaches, and the major genres and sub-genres within popular fiction. ; Foreword; A-Z of Key Concepts and Terms; Key Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Popular Fiction; Six Major Popular Genres (and one Popular Mode); 15 Key Works of Contemporary Popular Fiction; Chronology of Selected Key Dates in Popular Fiction; Bibliography for A-Z Section.

    • Shakespeare studies & criticism
      February 2016

      Worldly Shakespeare

      The Theatre of Our Good Will

      by Richard Wilson

      In Worldly Shakespeare Richard Wilson proposes that the universalism proclaimed in the name of Shakespeare's playhouse was tempered by his own worldliness, the performative idea that runs through his plays, that if ‘All the world’s a stage’, then ‘all the men and women in it’ are ‘merely players’. Situating this playacting in the context of current concerns about the difference between globalization and mondialisation, the book considers how this drama offers itself as a model for a planet governed not according to universal toleration, but the right to offend: ‘But with good will’. For when he asks us to think we ‘have but slumbered’ throughout his offensive plays, Wilson suggests, Shakespeare is presenting a drama without catharsis, which anticipates post-structuralist thinkers like Jacques Rancière and Slavoj Žižek, who insist the essence of democracy is dissent, and ‘the presence of two worlds in one’. Living out his scenario of the guest who destroys the host, by welcoming the religious terrorist, paranoid queen, veiled woman, papist diehard, or puritan fundamentalist into his play-world, Worldly Shakespeare concludes, the dramatist instead provides a pretext for our globalized communities in a time of Facebook and fatwa, as we also come to depend on the right to offend ‘with our good will’. ; A comprehensive rereading of Shakespeare’s plays in light of current debates about free speech and toleration.

    • Literary studies: plays & playwrights
      February 2017

      The Student's Guide to Shakespeare

      by William McKenzie

      An introductory guide to studying Shakespeare This book is a ‘one-stop-shop’ for the busy undergraduate studying Shakespeare. Offering detailed guidance to the plays most often taught on undergraduate courses, the volume targets the topics tutors choose for essay questions and is organised to help students find the information they need quickly. Each text discussion contains sections on sources, characters, performance, themes, language, and critical history, helping students identify the different ways of approaching a text. The book’s unique play-based structure and character-centre approach allows students to easily navigate the material. The flexibility of the design allows students to either read cover-to-cover, target a specific play, or explore elements of a narrative unit such as imagery or characterisation. The reader will gain quickly a full grasp of the kind of dramatist William Shakespeare was - and is. Key Features An introduction which gives an up-to-date ‘state-of-play’ of the academic, theatrical and cultural efforts inspired by Shakespeare’s texts A discussion of critical approaches to the playwright’s texts Succinct guides to Shakespeare’s most-studied plays Discussion questions ; This book is a ‘one-stop-shop’ for the busy undergraduate studying Shakespeare. Offering detailed guidance to the plays most often taught on undergraduate courses, the volume targets the topics tutors choose for essay questions and is organised to help students find the information they need quickly. ; Introduction; Part I: Tragedies; 1. Romeo and Juliet; 2. Hamlet; 3. Othello; 4. Macbeth; 5. King Lear; 6. Anthony and Cleopatra; Part II: Comedies; 7. A Midsummer Night’s Dream; 8. The Merchant of Venice; 9. Twelfth Night, or What you will; 10. Measure for Measure; Part III: Histories; 11. The ‘Henriad’; 12. The Henry VI trilogy and Richard III; Part IV: Late plays; 13. The Winter’s Tale; 14. The Tempest; Historical Chronology; Glossary.

    • Literary studies: plays & playwrights
      June 2017

      Is Shylock Jewish?

      Citing Scripture and the Moral Agency of Shakespeare's Jews

      by Sara Coodin

      A detailed exploration of the significance of Hebrew Biblical stories in The Merchant of Venice What happens when we consider Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice as a play with ‘real’ Jewish characters who are not mere ciphers for anti-Semitic Elizabethan stereotypes? Is Shylock Jewish studies Shakespeare’s extensive use of stories from the Hebrew Bible in The Merchant of Venice, and argues that Shylock and his daughter Jessica draw on recognizably Jewish ways of engaging with those narratives throughout the play. By examining the legacy of Jewish exegesis and cultural lore surrounding these biblical episodes, this book traces the complexity and richness of Merchant’s Jewish aspect, spanning encounters with Jews and the Hebrew Bible in the early modern world as well as modern adaptations of Shakespeare’s play on the Yiddish stage. Key Features Analyses alternative contexts for the moral agency of Jewish characters in The Merchant of Venice Provides an innovative study of Renaissance Christian Hebraism in England and English perceptions of Jews and Jewishness in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries Discusses important nineteenth- and twentieth-century Yiddish-language adaptations of The Merchant of Venice Makes a provocative and original argument about the importance of Judaic biblical exegesis to the long afterlife of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice ; Is Shylock Jewish studies Shakespeare’s extensive use of stories from the Hebrew Bible in The Merchant of Venice, and argues that Shylock and his daughter Jessica draw on recognizably Jewish ways of engaging with those narratives throughout the play. ; Introduction: Is Shylock Jewish?; 1. Renaissance England and the Jews; 2. Parti-Coloured Parables; 3. Stolen Daughters and Stolen Idols; 4. Rebellious Daughters on the Yiddish Stage; Conclusion.

    • Literary studies: general
      December 2017

      The American Short Story Cycle

      by Jennifer J. Smith

      Constructs a history of community, family and temporality in American culture through one of the nation’s most popular, yet unrecognized genres The American Short Story Cycle spans two centuries to tell the history of a genre that includes both major and marginal authors, from Washington Irving through William Faulkner to Jhumpa Lahiri. The short story cycle rose and proliferated because its form compellingly renders the uncertainties that emerge from the twin pillars of modern America culture: individualism and pluralism. Short story cycles reflect how individuals adapt to change, whether it is the railroad coming to the small town in Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio (1919) or social media revolutionizing language in Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010). Combining new formalism in literary criticism with scholarship in American Studies, this book gives a name and theory to the genre that has fostered the aesthetics of fragmentation, as well as recurrence, that characterize fiction today.Key Features: Spans two centuries to tell the history of a neglected genre that includes major and marginal authors Combines new formalism in literary criticism to scholarship in American Studies Constructs a history of community, family, and temporality in American culture ; The American Short Story Cycle spans two centuries to tell the history of a genre that includes both major and marginal authors, from Washington Irving through William Faulkner to Jhumpa Lahiri. ; Introduction: Forming Provisional Identities; 1. Locating the Short Story Cycle ; 2. The Persistence of Place; 3. Writing Time in Metaphors; 4. Tracing New Genealogies; 5. Resisting Identity; 6. Atomic Genre; Coda: Novellas-in-Flash and Flash Cycles; Selected American Short Story Cycles; Works Cited.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      September 2018

      Transgender and The Literary Imagination

      Changing Gender in Twentieth-Century Writing

      by Rachel Carroll

      Transgender and the Literary Imagination is the first full length study to revisit twentieth century narratives and their afterlives, examining the extent to which they have reflected, shaped or transformed changing understandings of gender. Grounded in feminist scholarship, informed by queer theory and indebted to transgender studies, this book investigates the ways in which transgender identities and histories have been ‘authored by others’, with a focus on literary fiction by British, Irish and American authors, life writing and adaptation for stage and screen. Key Features: First full length study of the representation of transgender characters in twentieth century literary fiction Essential overview of key critical issues for the analysis of transgender representation in literary fiction, informed by contemporary cultural debates Original readings of a selection of fiction by British, Irish and American authors, including Angela Carter, Patricia Duncker, David Ebershoff, Jackie Kay and George Moore Original readings of award-winning film adaptations, Albert Nobbs (2011) and The Danish Girl (2016

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