• Teaching, Language & Reference
      January 2019

      Konstruktionsgrammatik des Deutschen

      Ein sprachgebrauchsbezogener Ansatz

      by Klaus Welke

      Die prototypentheoretische und signifikativ-semantische (semasiologische) Orientierung der Konstruktionsgrammatik (KxG) durch George Lakoff und Adele Goldberg (Berkeley Cognitive Construction Grammar) wird am Beispiel des Deutschen in Richtung auf eine tätigkeitsbezogene (sprachgebrauchsbezogene) Grammatiktheorie ausgebaut, jenseits des Competence-Performance-Dualismus bisheriger Syntaxtheorien. Teil I entwirft eine konstruktionsgrammatische Beschreibung der Grammatik von Sätzen mit einfachen (nicht-komplexen) Prädikaten im Wechselverhältnis von Konstruktion und Projektion (Valenz) unter dem Primat der Konstruktion. Aus diesem Wechselverhältnis erklärt sich die Kreativität der SprecherInnen/HörerInnen beim Operieren mit Argumentkonstruktionen und die Produktivität syntaktischer Strukturen (Konstruktionen). Eingeschlossen ist die Beschreibung der Fusion von Modifikatorkonstruktionen und der Einbettung von Substantivkonstruktionen sowie eine konstruktionsgrammatische Interpretation der Variabilität von Wortfolgen. Im Teil II wird das deklarative Vererbungskonzept der KxG zu Gunsten eines sprachgebrauchsbezogenen Konzepts von Vererbung revidiert. Grammatiktheoretisch zentrale Phänomene wie Passivierung, Medialisierung, Nominalisierung und die Entstehung von Präpositionalobjekt-Konstruktionen und Partikel- und Präfixkonstruktionen werden auf dieser Grundlage als Konstruktionsvererbung erklärt.

    • Semantics
      April 1997

      The Intrigue of Ethics

      A Reading of the Idea of Discourse in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas

      by Jeffrey Dudiak

    • Semantics
      April 1997

      The Intrigue of Ethics

      A Reading of the Idea of Discourse in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas

      by Jeffrey Dudiak

    • Literature: history & criticism

      Saying And Silence

      by Frank Farmer

    • Semantics

      How to Be Brilliant at Writing Poetry

      by Irene Yates

      The activities in How to be Brilliant at Writing Poetry are open-ended and focus on the process of writing - from initial idea gathering to redrafting and the final product. They recognize that a sense of audience and a purpose for writing are crucial. The 40 reproducible worksheets aimed at 7–11 year olds (KS2) pupils provide models for different forms of poetry. Activities include: finding a beginning, using words to paint a picture, making up similes and rhyming.

    • Literature: history & criticism

      Teaching Composition As A Social Process

      by Bruce Mccomiskey

    • Education

      How to Be Brilliant at Writing Stories

      by Irene. Yates

      The 40 reproducible worksheets in How to be Brilliant at Writing Stories focus on the process of writing - from the initial idea gathering to redrafting and the final product. The activities recognize that a sense of audience and purpose are crucial, and allow children to feel ownership of their stories. Activities include: getting ideas, making notes, planning the story and developing characters.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2017

      Rhetorics of empire

      Languages of colonial conflict after 1900

      by Martin Thomas, Andrew Thompson, Richard Toye

      Stirring language and appeals to collective action were integral to the battles fought to defend empires and to destroy them. These wars of words used rhetoric to make their case. That rhetoric is the subject of this collection of essays exploring the arguments fought over empire in a wide variety of geographic, political, social and cultural contexts. Why did imperialist language remain so pervasive in Britain, France and elsewhere throughout much of the twentieth century? What rhetorical devices did political leaders, administrators, investors and lobbyists use to justify colonial domination before domestic and foreign audiences? How far did their colonial opponents mobilize a different rhetoric of rights and freedoms to challenge them? These questions are at the heart of this collection. Essays range from Theodore Roosevelt's articulation of American imperialism in the early 1900s to the rhetorical battles surrounding European decolonization in the late twentieth century.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2017

      Rhetorics of empire

      Languages of colonial conflict after 1900

      by Martin Thomas, Andrew Thompson, Richard Toye

      Stirring language and appeals to collective action were integral to the battles fought to defend empires and to destroy them. These wars of words used rhetoric to make their case. That rhetoric is the subject of this collection of essays exploring the arguments fought over empire in a wide variety of geographic, political, social and cultural contexts. Why did imperialist language remain so pervasive in Britain, France and elsewhere throughout much of the twentieth century? What rhetorical devices did political leaders, administrators, investors and lobbyists use to justify colonial domination before domestic and foreign audiences? How far did their colonial opponents mobilize a different rhetoric of rights and freedoms to challenge them? These questions are at the heart of this collection. Essays range from Theodore Roosevelt's articulation of American imperialism in the early 1900s to the rhetorical battles surrounding European decolonization in the late twentieth century.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2017

      Rhetorics of empire

      Languages of colonial conflict after 1900

      by Martin Thomas, Andrew Thompson, Richard Toye

      Stirring language and appeals to collective action were integral to the battles fought to defend empires and to destroy them. These wars of words used rhetoric to make their case. That rhetoric is the subject of this collection of essays exploring the arguments fought over empire in a wide variety of geographic, political, social and cultural contexts. Why did imperialist language remain so pervasive in Britain, France and elsewhere throughout much of the twentieth century? What rhetorical devices did political leaders, administrators, investors and lobbyists use to justify colonial domination before domestic and foreign audiences? How far did their colonial opponents mobilize a different rhetoric of rights and freedoms to challenge them? These questions are at the heart of this collection. Essays range from Theodore Roosevelt's articulation of American imperialism in the early 1900s to the rhetorical battles surrounding European decolonization in the late twentieth century.

    • Linguistics
      April 2016

      Elements of Formal Semantics

      An Introduction to the Mathematical Theory of Meaning in Natural Language

      by Yoad Winter

      Introducing some of the foundational concepts, principles and techniques in the formal semantics of natural language, Elements of Formal Semantics outlines the mathematical principles that underlie linguistic meaning. Making use of a wide range of concrete English examples, the book presents the most useful tools and concepts of formal semantics in an accessible style and includes a variety of practical exercises so that readers can learn to utilise these tools effectively. For readers with an elementary background in set theory and linguistics or with an interest in mathematical modelling, this fascinating study is an ideal introduction to natural language semantics. Designed as a quick yet thorough introduction to one of the most vibrant areas of research in modern linguistics today this volume reveals the beauty and elegance of the mathematical study of meaning. ; In five short chapters, this introductory textbook introduces some of the most essential principles and techniques of formal semantics. ; 1: Introduction; 2: Meaning and Form; 3: Types and Meaning Composition; 4: Quantified Noun Phrases; 5: Long-Distance Meaning Relationships; 6: Intensionality and Possible Worlds; 7: Conclusion and further topics; Bibliography; Index ; 1: Introduction 2: Meaning and Form 3: Types and Meaning Composition 4: Quantified Noun Phrases 5: Long-Distance Meaning Relationships 6: Intensionality and Possible Worlds 7: Conclusion and further topics Bibliography Index

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      May 2013

      Positions and Interpretations

      German Adverbial Adjectives at the Syntax-Semantics Interface

      by Martin Schäfer

      The structural and semantic properties of adverbials represent a still poorly understood area of sentential syntax and semantics in Germanic languages. In particular, it is an open question which different adverbial usages need to be distinguished, which usages are tied to which syntactic positions, and how these different usage can be formally analyzed. Focussing on adverbial adjectives in German, this study provides detailed answers to these questions. By distinguishing between verb-related adverbials and event-related adverbials, the author provides a new analysis of the large class of adverbials traditionally labelled as manner adverbials. It is shown that the two different classes are linked to different syntactic positions, and formal analyses and derivations for the two different usages are developed. The book is therefore of interest not only to anyone working on the linguistics of German but also to all linguists working on the syntax-semantics interface and the formal analysis of adverbials.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      June 2002

      Metaphor and Metonymy in Comparison and Contrast

      by René Dirven, Ralf Pörings

      The book elaborates one of Roman Jakobson's many brilliant ideas, i.e. his insight that the two cognitive strategies of the metaphoric and the metonymic are the end-points on a continuum of conceptualization processes. This elaboration is achieved on the background of Lakoff and Johnson's twodomain approach, i.e. the mapping of a source onto a target domain of conceptualization. Further approaches dwell on different stretches of this metaphor-metonymy continuum. Still other papers probe into the specialized conceptual division of labor associated with both modes of thought. Two new breakthroughs in the cognitive linguistics approach to metaphor and metonymy have recently been developed: one is the three-domain approach, which concentrates on the new blends that become possible after the integration or the blending of source and target domain elements; the other is the approach in terms of primary scenes and subscenes which often determine the way source and target domains interact.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      October 2003

      Semantik

      Eine Einführung

      by Sebastian Löbner

      Das Buch bietet eine aktuelle Einführung in die wichtigsten Phänomene, Fragestellungen und theoretischen Ansätze der linguistischen Semantik. Bei der schrittweisen Entfaltung der Thematik wird großer Wert auf Stimmigkeit, Kohärenz und Nachvollziehbarkeit der wissenschaftlichen Herangehensweise gelegt. Behandelt werden die wichtigsten Aspekte der Wortsemantik und der Satzsemantik. Durch Übungsaufgaben, Lesehinweise und ein ausführliches Register ist das Buch als Lehrbuch und zum Selbststudium geeignet.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      September 2000

      Discourse and the Continuity of Reference

      Representing Mental Categorization

      by Cornelia Zelinsky-Wibbelt

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      June 2005

      Troubled Talk

      Metaphorical Negotiation in Problem Discourse

      by Irit Kupferberg, David Green

      How is meaning constructed discursively by participants in problem discourse? To which discursive resources do they resort in order to accomplish their complicated tasks of problem presentation and negotiation of possible solutions? To what extent are these resources related to the interactional and meaningful construction of problems and solutions? Irit Kupferberg and David Green– a discourse analyst and a clinical psychologist– have explored naturally-occurring media, hotline, and cyber troubled discourse in a quest for answers. Inspired by a constructivist-interpretive theoretical framework grounded in linguistic anthropology, conversation analysis, narrative inquiry, and clinical psychology as well as their professional experience, the authors put forward three novel claims that are illustrated by 70 attention-holding examples. First, sufferers often present their troubles through detailed narrative discourse as well as succinct story-internal tropes such as metaphors and similes– discursive resources that constitute two interrelated versions of the troubled self. Particularly interesting are the intriguing figurative constructions produced in acute emotional states or at crucial discursive junctions. Second, such figurative constructions often 'lubricate' the interactive negotiation of solutions. Third, when the figurative and narrative resources of self-construction are employed in the public arena they are used and sometimes abused by the media representatives, depending on a plethora of contextual resources identified in this book.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      October 2007

      A-G

      by Peter Rolf Lutzeier

      Available on a standing order basis only

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      May 2008

      Handbook of Communication in the Public Sphere

      by Ruth Wodak, Veronika Koller

      As you are reading this, you are finding yourself in the ubiquitous public sphere that is the Web. Ubiquitous, and yet not universally accessible. This volume addresses this dilemma of the public sphere, which is by definition open to everyone but in practice often excludes particular groups of people in particular societies at particular points in time. The guiding questions for this collection of articles are therefore: Who has access to the public sphere? How is this access enabled or disabled? Under what conditions is it granted or withheld, and by whom? We regard the public sphere as the nodal point for the discourses of business, politics and media, and this basic assumption is also s reflected in the structure of the volume. Each of these three macro-topics comprises chapters by international scholars from a variety of disciplines and research traditions who each combine up-to-date overviews of the relevant literature with their own cutting-edge research into aspects of different public spheres such as corporate promotional communication, political rhetoric or genre features of electronic mass media. The broad scope of the volume is perhaps best reflected in a comprehensive discussion of communication technologies ranging from conventional spoken and written formats such as company brochures, political speeches and TV shows to emerging ones like customer chat forums, political blogs and text messaging. Due to the books' wide scope, its interdisciplinary approach and its clear structure, we are sure that whether you work in communication and media studies, linguistics, political science, sociology or marketing, you will find this handbook an invaluable guide offering state-of-the -art literature reviews and exciting new research in your field and adjacent areas.

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      March 2012

      Linguistic Supertypes

      A Cognitive-Semiotic Theory of Human Communication

      by Per Durst-Andersen

      The book offers a completely new view of language and of languages such as Russian, Chinese, Bulgarian, Georgian, Danish and English by dividing them into three supertypes on the basis of a step-by-step examination of their relationship to perception and cognition, their representation of situations and their use in oral and written discourse. The dynamic processing of visual stimuli involves three stages: input (experience), intake (understanding) and outcome (a combination). The very choice among three modalities of existence gives a language a certain voice -- either the voice of reality based on situations, the speaker's voice involving experiences or the hearer's voice grounded on information. This makes grammar a prime index: all symbols are static and impotent and need a vehicle, i.e. grammar, which can bring them to the proper point of reference. Language is shown to be a living organism with a determinant category, aspect, mood or tense, which conquers territory from other potential competitors trying to create harmony between verbal and nominal categories. It is demonstrated that the communication processes are different in the three supertypes, although in all three cases the speaker must choose between a public and a private voice before the grammar is put into use.

    Subscribe to our newsletter