• Business & management
      January 2012

      The Unprincipled

      The Unvarnished Truth About Running A Marketing Agency From Start-up To Sell-out

      by David Croydon

      Building a business from start-up to sell-out. When I started, or at least co-founded, a small sales promotion agency called Marketing Principles in Oxford over 20 years ago, I had no idea about the dramas that would ensue, or the mixture of fun and games and pain and heartache that could be telescoped into 12 short years. I needed to get a lot of this off my chest for cathartic and purely selfish reasons, but in doing so, and in my current role as small business advisor/coach/mentor/NEC, I realised along the way that the lessons learned might be instructive as well as just entertaining, which is where it originally started. The title is taken from the scurrilous in-house ‘newsletter’ our creative department took to compiling a couple of times a year, to debunk any of our employees who… oh, just anyone who worked for us (including me). We begin the journey in 1985. The key protagonists (at the beginning) all have gainful employment at another local agency, and on the face of it should be content with their lot. But then this thing called ambition comes knocking, and a 12-year roller coaster ride begins. A couple of reviewers have described the content as part business handbook, part memoir, part comic novel, which makes it difficult to categorise in publishing terms. Its style and tone of voice is what makes it unique, and it will appeal to small business owner/managers - from start-ups to established businesses - anywhere: they will recognise many of the issues and problems that we confronted along the way. So it's a personal account, but one that will resonate with anyone who has ever run a small business (or aspires to). Here's a video about the business that is the book's subject matter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2_heofh0WE

    • Biography: business & industry
      September 2001

      The Rose Man of Sing Sing

      A True Tale of Life, Murder, and Redemption in the Age of Yellow Journalism

      by James M. Morris

      Notorious city editor-tyrant of Pulitzer's "New York Evening World", Charles E Chapin was the greatest newspaperman of his day. In 1918, at the pinnacle of fame, Chapin, sunk in depression, took not his own life, but shot and killed his beloved wife. After his trial - and one hell of a story for the World's competitors - he was sentenced to life in Sing Sing Prison. Set in the most thrilling epoch of American journalism, this story tracks Chapin's rise from legendary street reporter to celebrity powerbroker in media-mad New York, a human tragedy played out in sensational stories of tabloids and broadsheets. The first portrait of a founding figure of modern American journalism and a vibrant chronicle of scoops and scandals, "The Rose Man of Sing Sing" is also a hidden history of New York at its most colorful.

    • Biography: business & industry

      The Very, Very Rich and How They Got That Way

      by Max Gunther

      The Very, Very Rich provides revealing insights into the intriguing world of big money, recounting the spectacular success stories of 15 men who made it to the very, very top.In 1972, Max Gunther invited readers to take a journey with him through a gallery of America's most prominent millionaires. The inhabitants framed here are by no means merely ordinary millionaires though, as the minimum qualifying standard to be considered for inclusion is ownership of assets valued at $100 million or more (the equivalent of $500 million today).This classic is now nearly 40 years old but its value endures, since the key steps on the route to wealth do not change with time. These secrets can be learned from, adapted and applied by anyone today.

    • Biography: business & industry

      Building a Billion

      The Story of John Mccarthy

      by Charlie Berridge

      John McCarthy MBE, of McCarthy & Stone, is a self-made multimillionaire. He and his family have been long-term members of The Times Rich List. One of the best examples of the self-made man, John started working life at fifteen as a "chippy". Every venture he has embarked on, he has achieved with drive and success. His legendary reputation is as the most successful builder of retirement homes across Europe. He has also built and skippered winning ocean-racing yachts. He has owned and run a top polo team. He became a big game hunter and avid game bird shooter, underwater diver, skier and squash player. He makes other septuagenarians look really old.In this book John McCarthy recounts his fascinating life story so far. But these are not just the interesting memoirs of a successful man. John's tussles with bankers and lawyers, planners and politicians, Government red tape and political autocracy, competitors and recalcitrant employees tell a story that has real relevance to all aspiring entrepreneurs in whatever field of endeavour. John McCarthy's rules of engagement and how to build a billion pound company are as topical now as they were when he did it.

    • Prose: non-fiction

      The Great Persuader

      The Biography of Collis P. Huntington

      by David Lavender

      ollis Huntington Holladay of San Marino, California, made available documents and letters written by his great uncle. They are cited in the Notes as 'Holladay Collection'. The letters sent by Collis Huntington to his brother Solon during the gold-rush period and the subsequent years in Sacramento, form a significant part of the Holladay collection and were particularly valuable in allowing a reconstruction of a hitherto little known period of Collis' life. This book includes lavish and fascinating detail, emphasising in particular the complex, often illegal, financial and political wirepulling that generally won the day for Huntington.

    • Biography: business & industry

      The New Rules of Business

      Leading Entrepreneurs Reveal Their Secrets for Success

      by Dan Matthews

      This is the ultimate guide to winning in business. Drawing on the experiences of some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs and corporate executives, it sheds light on the cut and thrust of commercial relationships and provides a candid insight into what it takes to thrive as an entrepreneur. Themes include the role of failure, luck and risk, people, power, money, greed and ambition. Together, it reveals the essential underlying truths which define business in the twenty-first century.The book contains thoughts, anecdotes and advice from 36 business people drawn from a variety of backgrounds and career paths. Multi-millionaire heads of billion-pound businesses rub shoulders with chief executives of some of the world's biggest blue-chip companies. Also featured are celebrity investors, business TV show contestants, and even those who have fallen foul of the business rules and survived to tell the tale.It is a must read for anyone wanting to grow a business, become wealthy and powerful, or make a meteoric push up the career ladder.

    • Biography: business & industry

      Instant Millionaires

      by Max Gunther

      In this book you will meet three dozen impatient people. They weren't satisfied with the slow, plodding, money-saving route to financial security, the safe route that most of us feel stuck with. They wanted instant wealth - and they got it.As Max Gunther points out, our folklore frowns on the idea of quick money. As in the fable about the race between a tortoise and a hare. "In the fable, the hare loses. The stories in this book are not fables. They are true. In these stories, the hares win."They are a richly varied lot, these happy hares. Gunther opens with a few dazzling millionaire legends, such as the man who invented Monopoly. You'll then meet fascinating characters such as: Harvey Shuster, who beat the stock market; Howard Brown, who decided to be rich and became a multi-millionaire within three years; and a group of men who made fast fortunes on fads such as the Hula Hoop and the Frisbee.These stores illustrate that the dream of quick money isn't such a ridiculous dream after all. Read these tales about hares who have won and when you have, maybe you'll decide to run with them.

    • Biography: business & industry

      Eyewitness: The Rise and Fall of Dorling Kindersley

      The Inside Story of a Publishing Phenomenon

      by Christopher Davis

      By the close of the last millennium Dorling Kindersley had become one of the most recognisable brands in publishing. Across the range of illustrated household reference titles, from children's books to travel guides, its distinctive look of colourful images cut out against a white background could be seen on bookshelves throughout the country - and indeed the publishing world.Apart from three minor acquisitions, DK had grown organically over 25 years to be a publicly listed company with a turnover of ?ú200 million, some 1500 employees, publishing arms across the English language markets, a 50-strong international sales force that dealt with more than 400 publishers, a direct selling business with 30,000 independent distributors, and had expanded its skills for delivering handsomely designed reference books into the new media of videos, CD-ROMs and online educational content. Then a series of catastrophic printing decisions brought the company to its knees, and ultimately into the arms of Pearson.Christopher Davis is uniquely positioned to tell the story of DK's rise and fall. He joined the company at its foundation and in due course became Group Publisher. The narrative he provides is a dual one, encompassing the visionary genius of Peter Kindersley and the publishing revolution he fomented, and charting the remarkable, sometimes precarious, frequently hilarious, roller-coaster ride as the company grew from a handful of people in a studio in South London to a substantial global business.In the rapidly changing publishing climate of today, this book is also a nostalgic reminder of a time when creativity could flourish unburdened by the shackles of corporate bureaucracy.

    • Autobiography: business & industry

      Simple But Not Easy

      An Autobiographical and Biased Book About Investing

      by Richard. Oldfield

    • Ships & shipping: general interest

      White Funnel Memories

      by George. Gunn

    • Entrepreneurship

      In for a Penny

      A Business Adventure

      by Peter Hargreaves

      Plain speaking has never held Peter Hargreaves back. In this candid and outspoken book, the multi-millionaire founder of investment company Hargreaves Lansdown tells the story behind its extraordinary success and gives his forthright views on what it takes to be successful as an entrepreneur and as an investor.Starting from his spare bedroom with a single phone and borrowed office equipment, Peter and his business partner Stephen Lansdown set out to build a business that would consciously be different from that of all their competitors. They have held fast to their unconventional ways ever since, regularly turning the company's strategy and business model upside down in their relentless effort to give their clients the best information, the best prices and the best service.Widely recognised as the number one firm in their business, Hargreaves Lansdown was floated on the London stock market in 2007, valued at ?ú800 million. In For A Penny is a must read for anyone who wants to understand how the investment business works, what's wrong with conventional management wisdom and what's right about the true meaning of entrepreneurship.

    • Autobiography: business & industry

      Opportunity Dubai

      by Peter Cooper

      Opportunity Dubai is the autobiographical account of a real-life business adventure in the modern city of Dubai. The author was a financial journalist in the city before deciding to join the internet revolution in 2000 by establishing the financial information website AME Info (www.ameinfo.com).However, this book is far more than the story of a relatively small business and its success (albeit a business that became a resource now used by millions of readers and sold for a multi-million dollar fortune in 2006). It is also an inside track on what is happening in modern Dubai, the focal point of hundreds of billions of dollars of investment, and a city whose GDP has quadrupled in a decade, outperforming any other in the world, including China.The author charts the progress of Dubai in the 2000s and setbacks such as the Second Gulf War and 9/11, which actually proved the source of a remarkable injection of repatriated capital into the increasingly ambitious projects of the Maktoum family under the leadership of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.Perhaps, as the trading hub of the Middle East, it should be no surprise that Dubai has been able to capitalise greatly on the Third Oil Boom. But Sheikh Mohammed's restless business vision never stands still. He created the Dubai Internet City in late 1999, just in time in fact to give the author of this book a dedicated free zone with 100 per cent ownership for his small business. And other developments such as the Burj Dubai and The World Islands proceed at an amazing pace.Opportunity Dubai asks where this is all leading to and whether it can be sustained. However, the author's own experience of prospering from the opportunities presented by this incredible city point in a positive direction; and many of his insights will benefit anybody thinking of joining this adventure, whether doing business in Dubai, buying a home there, or just taking up a job as an expatriate.

    • Biography: business & industry

      The Midas Touch

      The Strategies That Have Made Warren Buffett the World's Most Successful Investor

      by John Train

      Second edition featuring a brand new foreword.If you had put $10,000 in Buffett's original investing partnership at its inception in 1956, you would have collected about $293,738 by the time he dissolved it at the end of 1969. He had never suffered a down year, even in the severe bear markets of 1957, 1962, 1966, and 1969. When the partnership was wound up, you could have elected to stay with Buffett as a shareholder of Berkshire Hathaway, Inc., which was spun off from the partnership and became Buffett's investing vehicle. In that event, your $10,000 would by the end of 1986 have turned into well over $5 million.So, John Train introduces the remarkable story of Warren Buffett in his classic text, 'The Midas Touch'. First published in 1987, 'The Midas Touch' was one of the first books to recognise Warren Buffett's spectacular record, and to attempt to explain how he achieved his success. It is short, lucid and written with style and wit. A worthy testimony to its remarkable subject.From the back cover of the book:This is the book that tells readers how to invest like the man known as 'the Wizard of Omaha' (Forbes) and the investor with 'the Midas Touch' .Warren Buffett is the most successful investor alive - the only member of the Forbes 400 to have earned his fortune entirely through investing. Bestselling author John Train analyzes the strategies, based on the value approach, that have guided Buffett in his remarkable career, strategies that work even though Buffett operates a thousand miles from Wall Street.

    • Entrepreneurship

      In for a Penny

      A Business Adventure

      by Peter Hargreaves

      Plain speaking has never held Peter Hargreaves back. In this candid and outspoken book, the multi-millionaire founder of investment company Hargreaves Lansdown tells the story behind its extraordinary success and gives his forthright views on what it takes to be successful as an entrepreneur and as an investor.Starting from his spare bedroom with a single phone and borrowed office equipment, Peter and his business partner Stephen Lansdown set out to build a business that would consciously be different from that of all their competitors. They have held fast to their unconventional ways ever since, regularly turning the company's strategy and business model upside down in their relentless effort to give their clients the best information, the best prices and the best service.Widely recognised as the number one firm in their business, Hargreaves Lansdown was floated on the London stock market in 2007, valued at ?ú800 million. In For A Penny is a must read for anyone who wants to understand how the investment business works, what's wrong with conventional management wisdom and what's right about the true meaning of entrepreneurship.

    • Biography: business & industry

      Wort, Worms & Washbacks

      Memoirs from the Stillhouse

      by John. McDougall

      The memoirs of John McDougall, one of Scotland's best known whisky distillers. The book covers his time in the industry from 1963 to 1999, during which McDougall has worked in distilleries in Speyside, Ayrshire, Islay and Campbeltown, before setting up his own business in Kelso. The memoirs reveal the characters John has dealt with in the many differing places he has worked and portray a picture of the distillery shop floor, the stillroom and the mashroom, and the changes that have been made in them over the past 35 years.

    • Biography: general

      Bearly Believable

      My Part in the Paddington Bear Story

      by Shirley Clarkson

      "A heart-warming, inspirational tale of a woman trying to run a business while having me as a son."- Jeremy Clarkson"Originally made one Christmas as a present for Shirley's and her husband Eddie's children Jeremy and Joanna, the bear remains a classic of its kind - one which still gives me pleasure whenever I see it - and it served as a kind of yardstick when judging other products. Some things, like Concorde and the Jaguar XK120, look right from the word go. It was created with love and it was born with that indefinable something known as star quality. You either have it or you don't."- Michael Bond, author of the Paddington Bear stories'Bearly Believable' is the hilarious story of how Shirley Clarkson grew her company, Gabrielle Designs, from a tiny spare-room business selling tea cosies in Doncaster into an international business shipping Paddington Bears all over the world ... and then watched it collapse.With no business experience, no capital, just ?ú100 of backing, and a copy of Michael Bond's book for inspiration, Shirley came up with the original - now classic - Paddington. Manufacturing from a collection of ramshackle farm buildings, she was hit by a wave of orders from retailers, as the world went Paddington-crazy. From Tokyo to Sydney to San Francisco, everybody wanted him.As sales skyrocketed, Shirley and her husband Eddie experienced the giddy feeling of success, then the stresses of growth. Turnover leapt to a million a year, Gabrielle Designs was hailed as a British success story, and Shirley was invited to meet the Queen on her visit to Doncaster Mansion House. Meanwhile, storm clouds gathered. The workforce went on strike, 50,000 bears had to be recalled because of faulty eyes, Eddie was ill in bed for a year, and the pipes at the factory burst. Shirley employed a professional manager to rescue the situation - who turned out to be illiterate, dishonest, and incompetent. The '70s moved on, the craze faded, and the tide went out on Paddington as fast as it had come in.Shirley tells her rollercoaster story with warmth, modesty and a blunt Yorkshire wit. For fans of Paddington, her book provides a delightful insight into how a simple bear became a worldwide icon; for students of business, it provides lessons in how to create a business and, more particularly, how not to run one; for those who appreciate tales of triumph and adversity, it is packed with more ups and downs than Paddington's paw in a jar of marmalade.

    • Business & management

      Eyewitness

      The Rise and Fall of Dorling Kindersley

      by Christopher Davis

      By the close of the last millennium Dorling Kindersley had become one of the most recognisable brands in publishing. Across the range of illustrated household reference titles, from children's books to travel guides, its distinctive look of colourful images cut out against a white background could be seen on bookshelves throughout the country - and indeed the publishing world.Apart from three minor acquisitions, DK had grown organically over 25 years to be a publicly listed company with a turnover of ?ú200 million, some 1500 employees, publishing arms across the English language markets, a 50-strong international sales force that dealt with more than 400 publishers, a direct selling business with 30,000 independent distributors, and had expanded its skills for delivering handsomely designed reference books into the new media of videos, CD-ROMs and online educational content. Then a series of catastrophic printing decisions brought the company to its knees, and ultimately into the arms of Pearson.Christopher Davis is uniquely positioned to tell the story of DK's rise and fall. He joined the company at its foundation and in due course became Group Publisher. The narrative he provides is a dual one, encompassing the visionary genius of Peter Kindersley and the publishing revolution he fomented, and charting the remarkable, sometimes precarious, frequently hilarious, roller-coaster ride as the company grew from a handful of people in a studio in South London to a substantial global business.In the rapidly changing publishing climate of today, this book is also a nostalgic reminder of a time when creativity could flourish unburdened by the shackles of corporate bureaucracy.

    • Autobiography: business & industry

      The Bucks Stop Here

      by Jim Parton

      Updated edition of the City bestseller, with a brand new epilogue.By most people's standards, Jim Parton was being paid vast sums of money for doing nothing very much in the City. That is until, right in the middle of the recession, he is unceremoniously fired by his ungrateful boss. Sound familiar? Of course. But this is not 2009 mid credit crunch, this is the early 1990s. This a story from the last crisis, telling how Jim survived the shock of losing his job, the fallout from it, and how, despite all of it, he went on to have a happier life (in the end).This is Jim's story of 'before and after'; of Maseratis and designer clothes; of dim people earning disgusting salaries; of fashionable redundancy becoming feared unemployment - and of what really happens when you spend more time with your wife and family.A tale from the previous crash then, but one offering hope to those in the City right now and to those outside the City providing an insight to what life is like for people who populate the Square Mile. Find out what happens when the money stops...

    • Autobiography: business & industry

      The Bucks Stop Here

      by Jim Parton

      Updated edition of the City bestseller, with a brand new epilogue.By most people's standards, Jim Parton was being paid vast sums of money for doing nothing very much in the City. That is until, right in the middle of the recession, he is unceremoniously fired by his ungrateful boss. Sound familiar? Of course. But this is not 2009 mid credit crunch, this is the early 1990s. This a story from the last crisis, telling how Jim survived the shock of losing his job, the fallout from it, and how, despite all of it, he went on to have a happier life (in the end).This is Jim's story of 'before and after'; of Maseratis and designer clothes; of dim people earning disgusting salaries; of fashionable redundancy becoming feared unemployment - and of what really happens when you spend more time with your wife and family.A tale from the previous crash then, but one offering hope to those in the City right now and to those outside the City providing an insight to what life is like for people who populate the Square Mile. Find out what happens when the money stops...

    • Entrepreneurship

      The Maverick

      Dispatches from an Unrepentant Capitalist

      by Luke Johnson

      For eight years between 1998 and 2006, Luke Johnson wrote a regular column as 'The Maverick' in The Sunday Telegraph. His short, pithy essays tackled subjects ranging from rich lists to bankrupt companies, from high finance to investment techniques, from philanthropy to trophy wives, bringing a practitioner's eye to the commercial world and the people in it. The Maverick quickly developed a cult following among readers who wanted to understand the blunt truth about investment, entrepreneurs, business history, and corporate life.This book brings together 84 of the best articles, with updates, in a single volume. What makes them unique is that Luke Johnson is not just a first-class writer, he is also one of Britain's most successful entrepreneurs. He made his name with PizzaExpress, has run and owned businesses in many different sectors, and now takes stakes in fast-growing businesses through his company, Risk Capital Partners. He is also Chairman of Channel 4. The diversity of his experience enables him to write with insight and perspective about the very serious matter of making and losing money.If you are in business, you will find The Maverick entertaining, informative and inspiring. If you are not in business, you will discover what makes business people tick, the hurdles they have to overcome to succeed, and the substantial benefits they bring to society.www.lukejohnson.org

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