• The Arts
      September 2013

      The Engaged Musician

      A Manifesto

      by Sam Richards

      Social commentary. The Engaged Musician is a passionate call to musicians, of whatever genre or discipline, to rescue themselves and us from the commercial tyrannies and dictates currently forming our musical life, and relocate it very determinedly in a meaningful social and aesthetic exchange. The book focuses on various themes typical of social, political and cultural engagement, without insisting on sectional interests.

    • Music
      August 2014

      My Father The Godfather

      by Daryl Brown

      “My Father The Godfather” is a history changing book, but most importantly Daryl Brown will set the record straight about his dad, James Brown, The Godfather of Soul! Stories that have NEVER been told such as: Did you know that James Brown, The Godfather of Soul was offered over ten million dollars to convert to a certain religion? Daryl Brown believes that his dad…James Brown, his brother-in-law and his older brother Teddy were murdered. Susie Brown did not abandon James Brown as the movie “Get on Up” would have you believe. The relationship turned deadly with a murder attempt. Leaving the child was the only way to preserve both lives. Black police officer Donald Danner believes James Brown was shot at by white police officers because of the color of his skin. 23 shots fired at the truck. Two shots hit the gas-tank in an effort to “lawfully” murder James Brown. Tomi Rae was stopped by police for being married to a black monkey and the police told her they were going to kill James Brown. Overt racism and threat of “disappearing” or murder was a challenge for both Tomi Rae and Adrienne “James Brown’s 2 wives.” The Inner Circle will include but not limited to: the Mistress, the Limo Driver, the Widow, the Bodyguard, Band Members, Personal Physician, an Arresting Officer and many more! James Brown, The Godfather of Soul may be the most misunderstood man in the last century. His contributions toward modern music pale in comparison to the role he played in modern history. Brown lifted all races toward the ideals of equality and opportunity. Tragically, while he had the ability to calm the storms of social turmoil - his personal life was a perpetual tempest; sex, drugs, rhythm & blues. “My Father The Godfather” brings together, for the first time, Brown’s inner circle. They will correct the distortions of the past and provide the reader a clear understanding of the brilliance and generosity that was James Brown. This book will have you question your assumptions about politics, religion, sports, money and the entire entertainment industry. You will see inside the man. You will never be the same. The name, James Brown is an international Brand. His music is still being sold in over 110 countries. His face is certainly one of the most recognizable in the world. He is loved and adored by millions, but how many people really knew him?

    • Music
      August 2015

      Music Soothes the Soul

      by Matthew Bernstein

      “Music Soothes the Soul” features engaging stories from seventy musicians, artists, scientists and entrepreneurs who show how music can positively impact our lives. These personal narratives demonstrate that music truly is a universal language. “Music Soothes the Soul” reveals the worlds of famous celebrities as well as those who work behind the scenes. Discover how Gene Simmons, Chaka Khan, Dave Wakeling, Riker Lynch, and other artists got their start. Appreciate how nonprofits like Road Recovery and Guitars Not Guns help at-risk youth find emotional strength through making music. Get a peek backstage from musicians who play with Carlos Santana, Beyoncé, and Prince. Learn about performing on reality TV. Music inspired each story and this book tells why. All proceeds from book sales are being donated to the Fender Music Foundation to keep music programs healthy and vibrant across the nation. Music makes a difference in the world, in tangible and intangible ways. Every story shows why music is empowering and powerful, and how it positively can benefit us all.” Foreword by Larry Thomas, Founder of the Fender Music Foundation “Music is a powerful force. The benefits of music run as deep as one’s soul, and it has always taken me to a special place. I’ve been fortunate to spend my life around music, with musicians, instrument-makers, and the blessings of blending a deep passion with a daily job. As a teenager, I learned to play the guitar, and, throughout my life, musical instruments and the sounds they make have fascinated me. Music matters. It is part of the fabric of our culture and an essential part of our lives. Music Soothes the Soul is a must read for anyone who loves music. Matthew Bernstein, at age 17, has interviewed 70 fascinating music leaders from many countries who share a common passion, which is their love of music. In writing this book, Matthew’s goals were to inspire his readers and provide opportunities for children to imagine, create, and express themselves through music.”

    • Music reviews & criticism
      November 2015

      A Change Is Gonna Come: Dylan, die Beatles, die Rolling Stones und andere im Jahr 1966

      by Dürkob, Carsten

      Everyone is talking about 1967, the ‘Summer of Love’, about sun, love, peace – but what enabled this unique atmosphere, later turned into a myth? “A Change Is Gonna Come” answers this questions from the perspective of pop music, more specifically: from the perspective of a couple of songs, released in 1966, that unfolded their impact around the world in the following months. In the middle of the decade of carefree pop music, the most important songwriters born around 1940 compose lyrics about fear of the future, a lack of orientation and disillusionment. The LPs that were released in these few months do not merely change the direction and authenticity of music within one summer, but they are also a call to action: Things can’t go on like this! For this reason, ‘The Sounds of Silence’, ‘Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme’ (both Simon & Garfunkel), ‘Blonde on Blonde’ (Bob Dylan), ‘Revolver’ (The Beatles), ‘Aftermath’ (The Rolling Stones) and ‘Pet Sounds’ (The Beach Boys), as well as other individual songs, are the focus of “A Change Is Gonna Come”. They all show: The foundations of the world have become brittle in 1966. The ‘Summer of Love’ is just the response!

    • Music reviews & criticism
      July 2012

      Words are flying out' : Die Textgeschichte der Beatles

      by Dürkob, Carsten

      There are plenty of band biographies that deal with the Beatles’ careers and successes. As a contrast, even in the Anglophone market there is no detailed account of the development of their lyrics and the relation of the lyrics to each other. This is even more remarkable considering the remarks generally made about the friendly competition of the songwriters Lennon and McCartney. Still, the question whether and how this is mirrored in the band’s lyrics has not been pursued – a blank that is finally being filled with “Words are flying out”. The author shows how several topics and motives can be traced throughout the entire mass of songs, and how a sub/dialogue between the songwriters develops in the process. It quickly becomes obvious that the image of the happy and carefree ‘moptops’ is purposefully constructed with the singles, while the quantitatively equally present melancholy and pessimistic lyrics are predominantly to be found on the LPs. This is a new or even first interpretation of many lyrics and albums, and it turns out that hints to the future of the band can be found very early on – within the lyrics.

    • Music reviews & criticism
      January 2018

      Of Stigmatology

      Punctuation as Experience

      by Szendy, Peter

      What if our existence is a product of its interruptions? What if the words that structure our lives are themselves governed by the periods and commas that bring them to a close, or our images by the cinematic cuts that mark them off? Are we, like Chekhov's clerk, who dreams of being pursued by angry exclamation marks, or Scorsese's Jake LaMotta, bloodied by one violently edited fight after another, the products of punctuation—or as Peter Szendy asks us to think of it, punchuation? Of Stigmatology elaborates for the first time a general theory of punctuation. Beginning with punctuation marks in the common sense, Peter Szendy goes on to trace the effects of punctuation more broadly, arguing that looking and hearing are not passive acts of reception, but themselves punctuate the images and sounds they take in. Szendy reads an astonishing range of texts and traditions, from medical auscultation to literature (Chekhov, Sterne, Kafka), philosophy (Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida), psychoanalysis (Lacan), and film (Raging Bull, The Trial, Fight Club). Repeatedly, what Szendy finds in these works is a punctuation that marks experience itself, that seeks (and ultimately fails) to bind the subject to itself. This is the stigmatology of the punctuation mark on the page that structures texts from ancient to digital, as well as the punchuation of experience, as though at the hands of a boxer.

    • Theory of music & musicology
      January 2010

      The Resonance of a Small Voice

      William Walton and the Violin Concerto in England between 1900 and 1940

      by Author(s): Paolo Petrocelli

      This book constitutes both a study and a historical musicological analysis of Sir William Walton's Violin Concerto, treating the form of the violin concerto in general in England, as it developed between 1900 and 1940, taking into consideration the works of Charles Villiers Stanford, Edward Elgar, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Frederick Delius, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Arthur Somervell, Arnold Bax and Benjamin Britten. The study is divided into three parts:- The Violin Concerto in England between 1900-1920: Stanford, Elgar, Coleridge-Taylor, Delius.- The Violin Concerto in England between 1920 and 1940: Vaughan Williams, Somervell, Bax, Britten.- William Walton's Violin ConcertoThe book opens with a brief description of the form of the Violin Concerto between the 19th and 20th centuries in Europe. This description is intended to provide both a familiarity with the fundamental characteristics of this musical form during the period under examination, and the beginning of a comparison between different national compositional styles.Each section is introduced with a portrait of the historical musical character in England during the respective period, and presents, after a biographical introduction to the respective composers, a formal structural, harmonic and aesthetic analysis (this analysis being embedded within a general discussion of the concertos themselves). In addition, a study of the technical and interpretative aspects of the concerto and a reflection on the relationship between composer and performer form part of the analysis. At the close of each section a comparative overview is also given.The first and second parts are developed entirely in relation to the third, which treats, exclusively and in considerable depth, Sir William Walton's Violin Concerto, the work to which the greatest attention is devoted. The appendix provides various unpublished texts concerning some of the concertos treated (with particular reference to Walton's) that were gathered during research. It is hoped that these will prove useful in enriching and completing a reflection, begun in the book, on the decidedly performative and interpretative aspect of violin music produced by British composers in the first half of the 20th century. Currently there are no modern texts that approach the violin concertos of this period in an exhaustive way. This text proposes to fill the gap, drawing the attention of scholars, musicologists and musicians to the appeal of this repertoire, composed of works of great artistic value that have been, for too long, unjustly forgotten. The volume will be useful to university and conservatory students, musicologists, composers, violinists and musicians in general, in as much as it treats, in specialized yet accessible language, the aspects of the concerto that are of interest to the author.The study is enriched by the inclusion of unpublished documents (letters and essays written by both the composers themselves and by those to whom the concertos were dedicated), that will help to illuminate the myriad cultural and personal circumstances that fed and gave life to these great works.

    • Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers
      August 2010

      James Bond in World and Popular Culture

      The Films are Not Enough

      by Editor(s): Robert G. Weiner, B. Lynn Whitfield and Jack Becker

      James Bond in World and Popular Culture: The Films are Not Enough provides the most comprehensive study of the James Bond phenomena ever published. The 40 original essays provide new insights, scholarship, and understanding to the world of James Bond. Topics include the Bond girl, Bond related video games, Ian Fleming’s relationship with the notorious Aleister Crowley and CIA director Alan Dulles. Other articles include Fleming as a character in modern fiction, Bond Jr. comics, the post Fleming novels of John Gardner and Raymond Benson, Bond as an American Superhero, and studies on the music, dance, fashion, and architecture in Bond films. Woody Allen and Peter Sellers as James Bond are also considered, as are Japanese imitation films from the 1960s, the Britishness of Bond, comparisons of Bond to Christian ideals, movie posters and much more. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines have contributed a unique collection of perspectives on the world of James Bond and its history. Despite the diversity of viewpoints, the unifying factor is the James Bond mythos. James Bond in World and Popular Culture: The Films are Not Enough is a much needed contribution to Bond studies and shows how this cultural icon has changed the world.James Bond in World and Popular Culture: The Films are Not Enough features articles by noted scholars like Professor James Chapman, John Shelton Lawrence, Cynthia J. Miller, Dr. Wesley Britton, Dirk Fowler, Kristen Hunt, Kathrin Dodds, Tom L. McNeely, Claire Hines, Richard B. Spence, Cynthia Walker, Lisa M. Dresner, Andrea Siegel, and David Hopkins among many others.

    • Music reviews & criticism
      January 2013

      Temporaries and Eternals

      The Music Criticism of Aldous Huxley, 1922-23

      by Author(s): Michael Allis

      Marking the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), Temporaries and Eternals focuses on the music column that Huxley wrote for The Weekly Westminster Gazette in 1922–23. Readers of Huxley’s novels, essays and travel writing will be aware of the wealth of musical detail in these works, and this book suggests that such references can only be fully understood in the context of the opinions voiced in Huxley’s music criticism. Not only does Huxley’s column offer a fascinating snapshot of musical life in 1920s Britain, but several of the themes that Huxley explores continue to have contemporary relevance. These include music and technology, the composer-performer relationship, the nature of the child prodigy, musical tradition and innovation, the suitability of opera libretti, and how to write about music effectively. However, Huxley’s central theme, reflected in the title of this book, is the problematic question of how to judge the significance and potential longevity of specific composers and their works, from Palestrina to Schoenberg. After an extended introduction placing Huxley’s music criticism in the context of his other writings, the book reproduces all 64 of Huxley’s weekly articles, with footnote commentary to help the reader appreciate his wide-ranging textual references.

    • Music reviews & criticism
      August 2011

      Giacomo Meyerbeer

      Reputation without Cause? A Composer and his Critics

      by Author(s): Jennifer Jackson

      Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791–1864) was the most successful composer of grand operas in nineteenth-century Paris, whose music continued to be frequently performed worldwide into the following century. Today, recent scholars acknowledge his stature but his operas have become stage rarities. There is normally a gap on shelves in libraries and bookshops between Mendelssohn and Mozart (Messaien and Monteverdi for the better resourced). There is no biography or broad evaluation of Meyerbeer in print in English. This study of the vicissitudes of Meyerbeer’s reputation complements introductions to his works and the volumes of academic essays in English and other European languages. While reputation forming has recently offered several interesting studies, it is rare for a composer to be the subject.This volume will be of interest primarily to opera enthusiasts, and to libraries and musicologists worldwide.

    • Music: styles & genres
      November 2013

      The Crisis of the Opera? A Study of Musical Hermeneutics

      by Author(s): Ion Piso

      This study in artistic hermeneutics contains objections and critiques that have been generated by the contemporary cultural scenery of musical interpretation, especially related to the opera performances. Nevertheless, as the reader will surely notice, such critique can be very well applied to the entire spectrum of contemporary culture, as the phenomena described here are ubiquitous. Ion Piso’s ‘alarm signal’-study is essential reading, particularly as it comes from somebody who has over half a century’s experience of being an artist-interpreter in world opera. As such, Piso is well-placed to offer such a critique, and thus fulfil Goethe’s challenging desideratum: “You can only judge fairly what you, yourself, are able to accomplish”; as the following quotations fully illustrate:“J. Piso was the new duke [...] He incarnates all the virtues that an interpreter must have for this role, and which are seldom met with in one person. These are the reasons why the duke of Mantova has become a role for which they are looking for specialized tenors. Piso is both young and lean, elegant and full of temperament, a very credible and conquering playboy [...] La donna e mobile has the qualities of Gigli, and his legato sounds always seductive. Furthermore, who else brings together these days, the finesse of the belcanto with such a prodigality of brilliant high-notes?”– K. Honolka, Stuttgart, April 1964“[Piso in Werther, was the highlight of the season as] he represents the true Romantic style – which is the mode in which this role should be interpreted, what more can be said...”– A. J. Potter, Opera, London, February 1968“The virtuosity of Piso’s technique produces a special pleasure to the listener, especially by the manner in which the most powerful forte comes to fade away in the most delicate piano. Through a rich variety of expressive tools, he was able to reveal the contents of the Lieds by interpreting them with an excellent diction technique.”– Potsdamer Blick, March 17, 1966“Piso is the embodiment of the multilateral tenor, who has become today almost obsolete, due to the melodious charm of his voice, to his sensitivity, and to the homogeneity of his voice in all registers, even in the most ‘exposed’ passages.”– Die Union, Dresden, March 4, 1966

    • Films, cinema
      July 2017

      African Film Cultures

      Contexts of Creation and Circulation

      by Editor(s): Winston Mano, Barbara Knorpp, Añulika Agina

      The growing body of films in and around Africa, and the seemingly incongruent growth in African film scholarship, suggests the need for new perspectives, approaches and insights into film cultures in Africa. Although it is impossible to capture the entire diversity of existing African film cultures, this collection, which has resulted from African film conferences organized by the University of Westminster, United Kingdom, has recognized the significance and urgency of this task. The book offers a unique engagement with widened African film ‘cultures’ in the context of diverse peoples, histories, geographies, languages and changing film production cultures shaped by audiences and users at home and in the diaspora.The volume is a significant contribution to the processes of representing the self and other, as well as the emergence of alternative, non-official dialogues, circulation and consumption, including on social media. Students, researchers, film policy makers, film producers, distributors and anyone else with an interest in African screen media will find in the book useful and readable analyses of socio-political factors that affect and are shaped by African film.

    • Music reviews & criticism
      August 2011

      Giacomo Meyerbeer

      Reputation without Cause? A Composer and his Critics

      by Author(s): Jennifer Jackson

      Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791–1864) was the most successful composer of grand operas in nineteenth-century Paris, whose music continued to be frequently performed worldwide into the following century. Today, recent scholars acknowledge his stature but his operas have become stage rarities. There is normally a gap on shelves in libraries and bookshops between Mendelssohn and Mozart (Messaien and Monteverdi for the better resourced). There is no biography or broad evaluation of Meyerbeer in print in English. This study of the vicissitudes of Meyerbeer’s reputation complements introductions to his works and the volumes of academic essays in English and other European languages. While reputation forming has recently offered several interesting studies, it is rare for a composer to be the subject.This volume will be of interest primarily to opera enthusiasts, and to libraries and musicologists worldwide.

    • Theory of music & musicology
      January 2010

      The Resonance of a Small Voice

      William Walton and the Violin Concerto in England between 1900 and 1940

      by Author(s): Paolo Petrocelli

      This book constitutes both a study and a historical musicological analysis of Sir William Walton's Violin Concerto, treating the form of the violin concerto in general in England, as it developed between 1900 and 1940, taking into consideration the works of Charles Villiers Stanford, Edward Elgar, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Frederick Delius, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Arthur Somervell, Arnold Bax and Benjamin Britten. The study is divided into three parts:- The Violin Concerto in England between 1900-1920: Stanford, Elgar, Coleridge-Taylor, Delius.- The Violin Concerto in England between 1920 and 1940: Vaughan Williams, Somervell, Bax, Britten.- William Walton's Violin ConcertoThe book opens with a brief description of the form of the Violin Concerto between the 19th and 20th centuries in Europe. This description is intended to provide both a familiarity with the fundamental characteristics of this musical form during the period under examination, and the beginning of a comparison between different national compositional styles.Each section is introduced with a portrait of the historical musical character in England during the respective period, and presents, after a biographical introduction to the respective composers, a formal structural, harmonic and aesthetic analysis (this analysis being embedded within a general discussion of the concertos themselves). In addition, a study of the technical and interpretative aspects of the concerto and a reflection on the relationship between composer and performer form part of the analysis. At the close of each section a comparative overview is also given.The first and second parts are developed entirely in relation to the third, which treats, exclusively and in considerable depth, Sir William Walton's Violin Concerto, the work to which the greatest attention is devoted. The appendix provides various unpublished texts concerning some of the concertos treated (with particular reference to Walton's) that were gathered during research. It is hoped that these will prove useful in enriching and completing a reflection, begun in the book, on the decidedly performative and interpretative aspect of violin music produced by British composers in the first half of the 20th century. Currently there are no modern texts that approach the violin concertos of this period in an exhaustive way. This text proposes to fill the gap, drawing the attention of scholars, musicologists and musicians to the appeal of this repertoire, composed of works of great artistic value that have been, for too long, unjustly forgotten. The volume will be useful to university and conservatory students, musicologists, composers, violinists and musicians in general, in as much as it treats, in specialized yet accessible language, the aspects of the concerto that are of interest to the author.The study is enriched by the inclusion of unpublished documents (letters and essays written by both the composers themselves and by those to whom the concertos were dedicated), that will help to illuminate the myriad cultural and personal circumstances that fed and gave life to these great works.

    • Music reviews & criticism
      January 2013

      Temporaries and Eternals

      The Music Criticism of Aldous Huxley, 1922-23

      by Author(s): Michael Allis

      Marking the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), Temporaries and Eternals focuses on the music column that Huxley wrote for The Weekly Westminster Gazette in 1922–23. Readers of Huxley’s novels, essays and travel writing will be aware of the wealth of musical detail in these works, and this book suggests that such references can only be fully understood in the context of the opinions voiced in Huxley’s music criticism. Not only does Huxley’s column offer a fascinating snapshot of musical life in 1920s Britain, but several of the themes that Huxley explores continue to have contemporary relevance. These include music and technology, the composer-performer relationship, the nature of the child prodigy, musical tradition and innovation, the suitability of opera libretti, and how to write about music effectively. However, Huxley’s central theme, reflected in the title of this book, is the problematic question of how to judge the significance and potential longevity of specific composers and their works, from Palestrina to Schoenberg. After an extended introduction placing Huxley’s music criticism in the context of his other writings, the book reproduces all 64 of Huxley’s weekly articles, with footnote commentary to help the reader appreciate his wide-ranging textual references.

    • Music: styles & genres
      November 2013

      The Crisis of the Opera? A Study of Musical Hermeneutics

      by Author(s): Ion Piso

      This study in artistic hermeneutics contains objections and critiques that have been generated by the contemporary cultural scenery of musical interpretation, especially related to the opera performances. Nevertheless, as the reader will surely notice, such critique can be very well applied to the entire spectrum of contemporary culture, as the phenomena described here are ubiquitous. Ion Piso’s ‘alarm signal’-study is essential reading, particularly as it comes from somebody who has over half a century’s experience of being an artist-interpreter in world opera. As such, Piso is well-placed to offer such a critique, and thus fulfil Goethe’s challenging desideratum: “You can only judge fairly what you, yourself, are able to accomplish”; as the following quotations fully illustrate:“J. Piso was the new duke [...] He incarnates all the virtues that an interpreter must have for this role, and which are seldom met with in one person. These are the reasons why the duke of Mantova has become a role for which they are looking for specialized tenors. Piso is both young and lean, elegant and full of temperament, a very credible and conquering playboy [...] La donna e mobile has the qualities of Gigli, and his legato sounds always seductive. Furthermore, who else brings together these days, the finesse of the belcanto with such a prodigality of brilliant high-notes?”– K. Honolka, Stuttgart, April 1964“[Piso in Werther, was the highlight of the season as] he represents the true Romantic style – which is the mode in which this role should be interpreted, what more can be said...”– A. J. Potter, Opera, London, February 1968“The virtuosity of Piso’s technique produces a special pleasure to the listener, especially by the manner in which the most powerful forte comes to fade away in the most delicate piano. Through a rich variety of expressive tools, he was able to reveal the contents of the Lieds by interpreting them with an excellent diction technique.”– Potsdamer Blick, March 17, 1966“Piso is the embodiment of the multilateral tenor, who has become today almost obsolete, due to the melodious charm of his voice, to his sensitivity, and to the homogeneity of his voice in all registers, even in the most ‘exposed’ passages.”– Die Union, Dresden, March 4, 1966

    • Films, cinema
      July 2017

      African Film Cultures

      Contexts of Creation and Circulation

      by Editor(s): Winston Mano, Barbara Knorpp, Añulika Agina

      The growing body of films in and around Africa, and the seemingly incongruent growth in African film scholarship, suggests the need for new perspectives, approaches and insights into film cultures in Africa. Although it is impossible to capture the entire diversity of existing African film cultures, this collection, which has resulted from African film conferences organized by the University of Westminster, United Kingdom, has recognized the significance and urgency of this task. The book offers a unique engagement with widened African film ‘cultures’ in the context of diverse peoples, histories, geographies, languages and changing film production cultures shaped by audiences and users at home and in the diaspora.The volume is a significant contribution to the processes of representing the self and other, as well as the emergence of alternative, non-official dialogues, circulation and consumption, including on social media. Students, researchers, film policy makers, film producers, distributors and anyone else with an interest in African screen media will find in the book useful and readable analyses of socio-political factors that affect and are shaped by African film.

    • Exhibition catalogues & specific collections
      August 2019

      John Reeves

      Pioneering Collector of Chinese Plants and Botanical Art

      by Kate Bailey

      This is the story of the Reeves Collection of botanical paintings, the result of one man's single-minded dedication to commissioning pictures and gathering plants for the Horticultural Society of London. Reeves went to China in 1812 and immediately on arrival started sending back snippets of information about manufactures, plants and poetry, goods, gods and tea to Sir Joseph Banks. Slightly later, he also started collecting for the Society but despite years of work collecting, labelling and packing plants and organising a team of Chinese artists until he left China in 1831, Reeves never enjoyed the same degree of recognition as other naturalists in China. This was possibly because he had a demanding job as a tea inspector. Reeves himself never claimed to be a professional naturalist and the plant collecting and painting supervision were undertaken in his own time. Furthermore, fan qui (foreign devils) were restricted to the port area of Canton and to Macau, so that plant-hunting expeditions further afield were impossible. Furthermore, Reeves never published an account of his life in the country, unlike Clarke Abel and Robert Fortune, but he left us some letters, notebooks, drawings and maps. The Collection is held at the Royal Horticultural Society's Lindley Library in Vincent Square, London. It is a magnificent achievement. Not only are the pictures accurate and richly coloured plant portraits of plants then unknown in the West, but they stand as a record of plants being cultivated in nineteenth-century Canton and Macau. In John Reeves: Pioneering Collector of Chinese Plants and Botanical Art, Kate Bailey reveals John Reeves' life as an East India Company tea inspector in nineteenth-century China and shows how he managed to collect and document thousands of Chinese natural history drawings, far more than anyone else at the time.

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