• The Arts
      October 2018

      Study on Survival of Chinese Classical Opera

      by Wang Fuya

      The book mainly explores Chinese classical opera in terms of the existence, cutural essence and functions, artistic features, and the position in Chinese traditional culture. The author conducts study based on theories of popular culture and folk culture, historical resources of Chinese classical opera, along with various survival tactics for opera like opera adptation and opera prohibition.

    • Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • Fantasy
      November 2013

      Wind Riders

      Book One of the Fallen Lands Trilogy

      by Patrick Park-Tighe

      With a single, desperate cut of the knife, naïve and reckless Cat Calhoun finds himself forced into an unfamiliar landscape of intrigue and danger. Caught between a murderous giant and a hardly helpless pirate girl, Cat's split second decision leaves him adrift in the Fallen Land's shadowy world of sea-robbers, madmen and cutthroats--a place where politics and prophecies collide. Now, the further he travels from the mundane comforts of home, the deeper the mystery grows around the untested farm boy and the Shadow staining the land from Sturmgard to the Summer Coast and beyond. The Fallen Lands Trilogy can be described as a coming-of-age story where love and loss shape characters and destinies. Unique to this series is the role of the Archtypes. In the books' mythology, the Archtypes are the physical embodiment of the familiar elements driving modern narratives. The Hero, Shadow, Oracle and Trickster are all at play, struggling to understand their purpose and place, while caught between free will and pre-destination.

    • Adventure

      Winterdark

      Book Two of the Fallen Lands Trilogy

      by Patrick Park-Tighe

      A new season in the Fallen Lands brings a sad end for some and unexpected new beginnings for others. Cat Calhoun, broken and unsure, struggles to find his way after a series of devastating losses. For Bear Ra'Khan, unexpectedly favored by Fortune, dreams of power and revenge edge closer to reality. The Scarlet Weaver, sightless and imprisoned, watches as time and hope slip away. For her lover, D'Arc and the rest of the fugitive Pirate Lords, the gallows call even as the mystery of their betrayal deepens. Casting a shadow over all their fates--one powerful woman's unimaginably dark desires.

    • Adventure

      Twilight & Ashes

      Book Three of the Fallen Lands Trilogy

      by Patrick Park-Tighe

      Dark days have descended on the Fallen Lands. Cat Calhoun, finally accepting his destiny as the Pandarin, finds life as his generation's champion defined by compromise and sacrifice. The Forever King, still haunted by a tragic past, looks to the shape the Summer Coast's present and future through war. Behind all of it, the scheming shapeshifter, Grandmother Rose, inches closer to the fruition of her grand design--a world without hope, its sacred histories lost. A Red Seer and black magyck, old rivalries and new alliances collide in a struggle that threatens to send the Summer Coast spiralling into chaos.

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      February 2014

      Travel Shadows by Justinus Kerner

      by Editor(s): Harold B. Segel

      Justinus Kerner (1786–1862) was one of the most celebrated figures in nineteenth-century German culture. A physician by training, he was also a leading member of the Swabian Romantic circle of poets which included, among others, Ludwig Uhland and Gustav Schwab. Kerner’s international fame rests primarily on his contributions to the investigation of paranormal phenomena. The most important of these was his exhaustive case study, Die Seherin von Prevorst (The Seeress of Prevorst, 1829). The book was translated into English in 1849 by the English writer, Catherine Crowe (1803–76). Until the present, this has been the only work of Kerner available in English.Apart from his many scientific publications and his poetry, Kerner was also the author of one of the more intriguing literary works of German Romanticism, Die Reiseschatten (Travel Shadows, 1811). Ostensibly an account of his travels through Germany and Austria following his graduation from the University of Tübingen, the book is a highly imaginative, almost surreal concoction of Romantic, sentimental, grotesque, satirical, and Old German folkloric elements. Attributed by Kerner to an itinerant “shadow performer” named Lux, Travel Shadows was inspired by the tradition of “Chinese Shadows” (ombres chinoises) and represents Kerner’s attempt to create a travel narrative in the form of a grandiose shadow show.In the introduction to his translation of Travel Shadows – the first in English – Harold B. Segel situates Kerner’s work in the context of the emergence of a German shadow show tradition in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

    • Theatre studies
      September 2009

      Pinter Et Cetera

      by Editor(s): Craig N. Owens

      PINTER ET CETERA, edited by Craig N. Owens, is among the first volumes published since playwright Harold Pinter's death to account for the many ways his poems, plays, fiction, screenwriting, and public statements have have influenced the creative work of artists and writers worldwide. It collects nine essays by nine scholars from five nations, each approaching Pinter's work from a different perspective. Together, these essays offer a compelling argument for thinking of Pinter not merely as a unique writer whose individual genius has introduced the world to a particular aesthetic, but more importantly, as an artist working within numerous traditions, influencing and influenced by the work of painters, installation artists, film directors, photographers, poets and, of course, theatre-makers. PINTER ET CETERA is a bold step toward expanding our understanding of Pinter and establishing its importance beyond the absurdist stage. Contributors include Judith Roof, Ubiratan Paiva de Oliveira, Kyounghye Kwon, Mark Taylor-Batty, Michael Stuart Lynch, Jeanne Colleran, Andrew Wyllie, Christopher Wixson, and Lance Norman.

    • Theatre studies
      December 2011

      Theatre Noise

      The Sound of Performance

      by Editor(s): Lynne Kendrick and David Roesner

      This book is a timely contribution to the emerging field of the aurality of theatre and looks in particular at the interrogation and problematisation of theatre sound(s). Both approaches are represented in the idea of ‘noise’ which we understand both as a concrete sonic entity and a metaphor or theoretical (sometimes even ideological) thrust. Theatre provides a unique habitat for noise. It is a place where friction can be thematised, explored playfully, even indulged in: friction between signal and receiver, between sound and meaning, between eye and ear, between silence and utterance, between hearing and listening. In an aesthetic world dominated by aesthetic redundancy and ‘aerodynamic’ signs, theatre noise recalls the aesthetic and political power of the grain of performance.‘Theatre noise’ is a new term which captures a contemporary, agitatory acoustic aesthetic. It expresses the innate theatricality of sound design and performance, articulates the reach of auditory spaces, the art of vocality, the complexity of acts of audience, the political in produced noises. Indeed, one of the key contentions of this book is that noise, in most cases, is to be understood as a plural, as a composite of different noises, as layers or waves of noises. Facing a plethora of possible noises in performance and theatre we sought to collocate a wide range of notions of and approaches to ‘noise’ in this book – by no means an exhaustive list of possible readings and understandings, but a starting point from which scholarship, like sound, could travel in many directions.

    • The Arts: General Issues
      November 2009

      Pageants and Processions

      Images and Idiom as Spectacle

      by Editor(s): Herman du Toit

      Nowadays pageants often take the form of parades of effervescent young women competing for popular recognition in hyped up media events. However, these “beauty pageants” are a mere pastiche of the elaborate historical parades of the medieval period that took significant, social, religious, or civic events and their protagonists, as subjects. Pageants were historically characterized by resplendent costuming and elaborate processions that were often given to much pomp and ceremony. Pageantry has formed an important part of the civic life of most societies, both ancient and modern, serving a variety of cultural and political purposes. The use of drama and public spectacle as an instrument of civic, social, and religious activism has recently become the focus of renewed academic inquiry. The essays in this interdisciplinary anthology provide carefully researched insights into the phenomenon of pageantry over the centuries and across broad cultural boundaries.

    • Circus
      February 2007

      The Many Worlds of Circus

      by Editor(s): Robert Sugarman

      Acrobats and manipulators of objects, trained animals, and clowns – have been performing throughout history. In the eighteenth century, the invention of the circus ring provided a focus for the activities, and the modern circus was born. Once the circus was the most spectacular entertainment many Americans saw. When the supply of cheap labor disappeared and other forms of entertainment became available, the giant circuses shrank, and in the last quarter of the twentieth century new one ring circuses returned. The Circus and Circus Culture area of the Popular Culture Association has been examining circus history, circus life, the relationship of circus to society, and the impact of circus on the visual and literary arts since 1997. This book is a collection of papers from its annual conferences."This fascinating collection showcases the transnational richness and culturaldepth of the circus in an array of historical and contemporary settings.Strongly recommended for circus enthusiasts and students of popular culture,history, and theater."—Janet M.Davis, Associate Professor, Chair of the Department of American Studies, College of Liberal Arts at UT Austin, author of The Circus Age: Culture and Society under the American Big Top

    • Other performing arts
      March 2009

      From Word to Canvas

      Appropriations of Myth in Women’s Aesthetic Production

      by Editor(s): V.G. Julie Rajan and Sanja Bahun-Radunović

      From Word to Canvas: Appropriations of Myth in Women’s Aesthetic Production is an innovative collection of essays on female aesthetic production and myth, examining the ways in which women artists and writers utilize myth to negotiate their perceptions of feminine identity and feminine representation in an increasingly complex and culturally hybrid world. The featured essays and artistic contributions address a variety of contemporary female productions, including literature, performance, and visual art, in a markedly global scope. Representing a wide range of cultures, languages, geographic locales, and social contexts—from Jewish-Hindu and Kenyan-German, through Irish, Italian, American, to Vietnamese folktales—this diversified selection underscores the agency of “the feminine gaze” across a historical and geopolitical span, a gaze through which myths from various cultures and different cultural amalgams speak to us with force and with significance. The potency of this gaze is linked to the potential of myth simultaneously to encompass and compress history, and to offer the result as a backdrop against which the move from word to canvas—or from a mythic tale to its aesthetic appropriation—is performed in female aesthetic production.

    • Circus
      February 2007

      The Many Worlds of Circus

      by Editor(s): Robert Sugarman

      Acrobats and manipulators of objects, trained animals, and clowns – have been performing throughout history. In the eighteenth century, the invention of the circus ring provided a focus for the activities, and the modern circus was born. Once the circus was the most spectacular entertainment many Americans saw. When the supply of cheap labor disappeared and other forms of entertainment became available, the giant circuses shrank, and in the last quarter of the twentieth century new one ring circuses returned. The Circus and Circus Culture area of the Popular Culture Association has been examining circus history, circus life, the relationship of circus to society, and the impact of circus on the visual and literary arts since 1997. This book is a collection of papers from its annual conferences."This fascinating collection showcases the transnational richness and culturaldepth of the circus in an array of historical and contemporary settings.Strongly recommended for circus enthusiasts and students of popular culture,history, and theater."—Janet M.Davis, Associate Professor, Chair of the Department of American Studies, College of Liberal Arts at UT Austin, author of The Circus Age: Culture and Society under the American Big Top

    • Music
      October 2013

      Sound, Music and the Moving-Thinking Body

      by Editor(s): Marilyn Wyers, Osvaldo Glieca

      It has long been known that practicing musicians and dancers draw upon interdisciplinary relationships between sound and movement to inform their work and that many performance arts educators apply these relationships in working with aspiring composers, choreographers and performers. However, most material on the subject has been, to this point, relegated to single chapters in books and journal articles. Now, Sound, Music and the Moving-Thinking Body brings together the diverse topics researchers and practitioners across the sector are exploring, and raises issues concerning the collaborative aspects of creating and performing new work.Sound, Music and the Moving-Thinking Body is a result of the Composer, Choreographer and Performer Collaboration Conference of Contemporary Music and Dance/Movement 2012 hosted by the Institute of Musical Research, Senate House, University of London, and the Department of Music at Goldsmiths, University of London.

    • Theatre studies
      November 2009

      Performance, Embodiment and Cultural Memory

      by Editor(s): Colin Counsell and Roberta Mock

      The subject of cultural memory, and of the body’s role in its creation and dissemination, is central to current academic debate, particularly in relation to performance. Viewed from a variety of theoretical positions, the actions of the meaning-bearing body in culture and its capacity to reproduce, challenge or modify existing formulations have been the focus of some of the most influential studies to emerge from the arts and humanities in the last two and a half decades. The ten essays brought together in Performance, Embodiment and Cultural Memory address this subject from a unique diversity of perspectives, focusing on topics as varied as live art, puppetry, memorial practice, ‘cultural performance’ and dance. Dealing with issues ranging from modern nation building to the formation of diasporic identities, this volume collectively considers the ways in which the human soma functions as a canvas for cultural meaning, its forms and actions a mnemonics for constructions of a shared past. This volume is required reading for those interested in how bodies, both on stage and in everyday life, 'perform' meaning.

    • Social & cultural history
      October 2008

      Gags and Greasepaint

      A Tribute to the Irish "Fit-Ups"

      by Author(s): Vikki Jackson Editor(s): Edited by Mícheál Ó hAodha

      This volume is a paean to the “Revue”, the “Fit-Up” and the fifty or more travelling roadshows which traversed the roads of Ireland during the heyday of the “fit-ups”, the decades prior to the Second World War. This book is a personal memoir of one of the “goddesses” of Irish repertory theatre―Vic (Victoria Loving)―the woman known as the “Sequin Queen”―as recounted by her granddaughter, one of the last of these travelling artistes. It is a celebration of Ireland’s “curtain up”, and the “five-and-nine”, the fairground barker and the circus tober. It is a hymn to the artist whose home was the road and whose stage-wing voices lie hidden in the boarded-up hall and the abandoned outhouse. Listen up!―for one last garish display of the paint-glow, one final tread of the magic footboard.

    • The Arts: General Issues

      Yr Eisteddfod Genedlaethol

      The National Eisteddfod

      by Rhian A. Davies

    • Pageants, parades, festivals

      The National Pageant of Wales

      by Hywel Teifi. Edwards

    • Places & peoples: pictorial works

      Great Welsh Festivals

      by Andrea. Miller

    • Mime

      City Folks

      An original Screenplay

      by B Foreman, M Gordon

      Unlucky at the races our ‘heros’ play a scam on an unsuspecting Arab Sheik - himself a con artist. A tale of money laundering, slave trade, weapons for sale from the USA and a ‘change of heart plan’ by our ‘heros’ to thwart the weapons trade-off. From corruption to the ‘ feel good’ factor, a comedy drama when good overcomes evil. Low budget.

    • Mime

      The Paté

      An original Screenplay

      by M Gordon, C Kerkis

      In an attempt to go straight, Mel’s run-in with his former Mafioso Boss thwarts his plans. Secret deals, diamond smuggling, a fast car chase and an FBI undercover informant. How to rescue his Fiancée and bring the others to justice during a ferocious showdown.

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