• Individual actors & performers

      An East End Life

      by Derek Martin

      As long-suffering EastEnders patriarch Charlie Slater, Derek Martin has become one of British TV's best loved stars. Now in this witty and revealing memoir, Derek tells of his extraordinary journey from growing up in the real East End of London during the Blitz to taking up residency in Albert Square. Derek's journey to Albert Square has proved to be an eventful one. A bone fide East Ender, born within the sound of Bow Bells, Derek grew up during the Blitz in a tight-knit, working-class family. In this candid memoir he describes those tough early days, his stint in the police, life on the wrong side of the law and how he turned his dream of being an actor into a reality. But not before trying his hand as a professional gambler and acting as a runner for the notorious East End gangster Charlie Kray, brother of twins Ronnie and Reggie. Determined to be an actor, Derek began his hugely successful stage and screen career firstly as a stuntman; before landing memorable TV roles in series such as Law and Order, Minder, King and Castle, The Governor and doomed soap Eldorado. In this frank and revealing tale, Derek pulls no punches as he admits past mistakes and describes his remarkable transformation into one of our best loved actors. Meet the man behind the character as he shares with readers his heartbreak over two marriage break ups and his devotion to his twin boys. An East End Life is a truly remarkable story spanning nearly seven decades, packed with tears and laughter that will endear you to this popular star.

    • Individual actors & performers

      On the Beat

      My Story

      by Graham Cole

      Actor Graham Cole pounded the beat in ITV1 police drama The Bill for more than two decades and won plaudits for his carefully crafted portrayal of dependable PC Tony Stamp, the television cop most like the real thing. While on screen Tony Stamp became a Sun Hill stalwart and the sort of old-fashioned policeman you would want on your side, off-screen Graham worked tirelessly with the real police to make sure he's kept up to date with frontline officers. Graham worked in the NHS as a porter before starting his acting career doing summer seasons and working in holiday camps. His television break came as an extra playing monsters in Doctor Who and appearing in episodes of shows such as Only Fools and Horses and Secret Army. Later his skill at stage fighting landed him work as an extra in The Bill and it wasn't long before he was given a full-time job as area car driver and all round good guy Tony Stamp. Now, in a witty and candid memoir, he reveals just what it was like to star in one of television's most enduring series, the key events he's seen during his time on the show and how he really felt about leaving after 25 years. On The Beat is the entertaining autobiography of a likeable star who reveals the inside story behind the scenes of Britain's favourite police drama and the ups and downs of an actor's life.

    • Television

      Only Fools and Horses

      The Official Inside Story

      by Steve Clark

      At its height more than24 million peoplewatched the classic comedy seriesOnly Fools and Horses, making it Britain's most popular television programme ever. The hilarious exploits of wheeler-dealer Del Trotter and his dopey brother Rodney enthralled everyone from real market traders to members of the Royal Family. Only Fools and Horses - The Official Inside Storytakes us behind the scenes to reveal the secrets of the hit show and is fully authorised by the family of John Sullivan, the show's creator and writer. Containing in-depth interviews with the show's stars including Sir David Jason and Nicholas Lyndhurst and key members of the production team, this engaging tribute includes a comprehensive episode guide. It also reveals how the show was rejected when it was first offered to the BBC, how Sir David Jason nearly missed out on the starring role and the tragedy of the death of one of its stars during filming. Written by bestselling author Steve Clark, the only writer on set for the filming ofOnly Fools and Horses, spin-offThe Green Green Grassand prequelRock & Chips, the book gives a fascinating and unique insight into this legendary series.

    • Travel & holiday

      British Television Location Guide

      by Steve Clark, Shoba Vazirani

      The British Television Location Guide reveals the actual settings of Britain's favourite television shows and tells readers how they can visit them. It is meticulously researched, right up to date and includes details of the real-life filming locations for all the top series including: Downton Abbey, Broadchurch, Call The Midwife, Midsomer Murders, Doc Martin, Endeavour, Doctor Who, Miss Marple, The Great British Bake-off, Foyle's War, Game of Thrones, The White Queen, Mr Selfridge and dozens more.

    • Humour
      October 2012

      The Wit and Wisdom of Only Fools and Horses

      by Dan Sullivan

      The ‘crème de la menthe’ of the hilarious one-liners from John Sullivan’s Only Fools and Horses have been brought together for the first time in The Wit and Wisdom of Only Fools and Horses. All of Del, Rodney, Grandad, Uncle Albert, Boycie, Trigger and the rest of the gang’s funniest and most memorable lines are here, making this triffic book a pukka 42-carat gold-plated bargain.

    • Humour

      More Wit & Wisdom of Only Fools and Horses

      by Dan Sullivan

      More hilarious crème de la menthe one-liners from Britain s favourite sitcom Only Fools and Horses. Re-live all the funniest and most memorable lines from Del, Rodney, Grandad, Uncle Albert, Boycie, Trigger and the rest of the gang in this pukka official book. More Wit and Wisdom of Only Fools and Horses makes the perfect stocking filler.

    • Adventure
      April 2015

      The Game Master

      by Ian D Copsey

      What is it like to be someone else – especially your most hated enemy? Why do they think and do things differently? Tired of arguing over which of them was the best gamer, Josh and Alex stumbled upon a new video game shop, run by an enigmatic and amiable Japanese shopkeeper. He was to be their Game Master in this virtual reality video game that had no game controls. Little did they know it was a game that would change their lives, of their friends… and enemies… forever. “Oh! This game is no ordinary game,” The Game Master explained, “It reads your thoughts, seeks out your weaknesses to give challenges that are right just for you, the challenges you need to help you grow.” "It can read our minds?" puzzled the boys. As they progressed through the game’s levels they found out more about themselves and the lives of everyone around them. Mysteriously, the Game of Life began to spread its influence beyond Josh and Alex’s lives and to their friends. From Josh and Alex switching roles with each other in the game, campfire frolics and ghostly stories from their teachers, the boys learned more about their friends around them. The Game Master’s zany antics as he hosted a T.V. game show, “Hiro’s Happy Heroes” in the Game of Life, released a string of rib tickling gags, teases and tantalising tattles. The climax of the Game of Life came from the school Rube Goldberg challenge in which each grade had to join as a team to build their own whacky, madcap contraption. Would Josh and Alex be able to manage to get the two bullies in the class to work within the team? Patiently, with impish humour, the Game Master guides them through the different levels to a final intriguing twist.

    • Television
      June 2010

      A History of Independent Television in Wales

      by Jamie Medhurst (Author)

      This book provides, for the first time, a detailed historical narrative and critical analysis of independent television (ITV) in Wales. Focusing primarily on the critical years of the 1950s and 1960s, and drawing on key archival sources from Wales and beyond, it locates the history of ITV within wider debates over national identity, language and culture in Wales. It also aims to redress an imbalance in media historiography where the more established BBC has ‘stolen the limelight’. The attention devoted to Wales, and commercial television in Wales in particular, in the broad spectrum of broadcasting historiography has been minimal. Seen by some as a more populist and sometimes ‘tacky’ alternative to the BBC, the book argues that in Wales ITV pioneered across a range of programming formats, including games shows and news in the Welsh language, and moved the television service forward in many ways. ITV in Wales provided nurture for creative talent in both English and Welsh languages and produced some ground-breaking programmes which changed the face of Welsh television. It also provided a degree of plurality within the media in Wales. Accessible to undergraduate and postgraduate students, it will also appeal to the general reader with an interest in the media in Wales, Welsh history and the cultural politics of broadcasting in a small nation.

    • Television
      November 2015

      Entertaining television

      The BBC and popular television culture in the 1950s

      by Su Holmes

      Entertaining television challenges the idea that the BBC in the 1950s was elitist and 'staid', upholding Reithian values in a paternalistic, even patronising way. By focusing on a number of (often controversial) programme case studies - such as the soap opera, the quiz/ game show, the 'problem' show and programmes dealing with celebrity culture - Su Holmes demonstrates how BBC television surprisingly explored popular interests and desires. She also uncovers a number of remarkable connections with programmes and topics at the forefront of television today, ranging from talk shows, 'Reality TV', even to our contemporary obsession with celebrity. The book is iconclastic, percipient and grounded in archival research, and will be of use to anyone studying television history.

    • Television
      November 2015

      Entertaining television

      The BBC and popular television culture in the 1950s

      by Su Holmes

      Entertaining television challenges the idea that the BBC in the 1950s was elitist and 'staid', upholding Reithian values in a paternalistic, even patronising way. By focusing on a number of (often controversial) programme case studies - such as the soap opera, the quiz/ game show, the 'problem' show and programmes dealing with celebrity culture - Su Holmes demonstrates how BBC television surprisingly explored popular interests and desires. She also uncovers a number of remarkable connections with programmes and topics at the forefront of television today, ranging from talk shows, 'Reality TV', even to our contemporary obsession with celebrity. The book is iconclastic, percipient and grounded in archival research, and will be of use to anyone studying television history.

    • Television
      November 2015

      Cult british TV comedy

      From Reeves and Mortimer to Psychoville

      by Leon Hunt

      This book is the first sustained critical analysis of Cult British TV comedy from 1990 to the present day. The book examines 'post-alternative' comedy as both 'cult' and 'quality' TV, aimed mostly at niche audiences and often possessing a subcultural aura (comedy was famously declared 'the new 'rock'n'roll' in the early '90s). It includes case studies of Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer and the sitcom writer Graham Linehan. It examines developments in sketch shows and the emergence of 'dark' and 'cringe' comedy, and considers the politics of 'offence' during a period in which Brass Eye, 'Sachsgate' and Frankie Boyle provoked different kinds of media outrage. Programmes discussed include Vic Reeves Big Night Out, Peep Show, Father Ted, The Mighty Boosh, The Fast Show and Psychoville. Cult British TV Comedy will be of interest to both students and fans of modern TV comedy.

    • Television
      November 2015

      Cult british TV comedy

      From Reeves and Mortimer to Psychoville

      by Leon Hunt

      This book is the first sustained critical analysis of Cult British TV comedy from 1990 to the present day. The book examines 'post-alternative' comedy as both 'cult' and 'quality' TV, aimed mostly at niche audiences and often possessing a subcultural aura (comedy was famously declared 'the new 'rock'n'roll' in the early '90s). It includes case studies of Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer and the sitcom writer Graham Linehan. It examines developments in sketch shows and the emergence of 'dark' and 'cringe' comedy, and considers the politics of 'offence' during a period in which Brass Eye, 'Sachsgate' and Frankie Boyle provoked different kinds of media outrage. Programmes discussed include Vic Reeves Big Night Out, Peep Show, Father Ted, The Mighty Boosh, The Fast Show and Psychoville. Cult British TV Comedy will be of interest to both students and fans of modern TV comedy.

    • Television
      September 2015

      A loss of innocence?

      Television and Irish society, 1960–72

      by Robert J. Savage

      This book explores the evolution of Ireland's national television service during its first tumultuous decade, addressing how the medium helped undermine the conservative political, cultural and social consensus that dominated Ireland into the 1960s. It also traces the development of the BBC and ITA in Northern Ireland, considering how television helped undermine a state that had long governed without consensus. Using a wide array of new archival sources and extensive interviews Savage illustrates how an increasingly confident television service upset political, religious and cultural elites who were profoundly uncomfortable with the changes taking place around them. Savage argues that during this period television was not a passive actor, but an active agent often times aggressively testing the limits of the medium and the patience of governments. Television helped facilitate a process of modernisation that slowly transformed Irish society during the 1960s. This book will be essential for those interested in contemporary Irish political and cultural history and readers interested in media history, and cultural studies.

    • The Arts
      May 2010

      A loss of innocence?

      Television and Irish society, 1960–72

      by Robert Savage

      This book explores the evolution of Ireland's national television service during its first tumultuous decade, addressing how the medium helped undermine the conservative political, cultural and social consensus that dominated Ireland into the 1960s. It also traces the development of the BBC and ITA in Northern Ireland, considering how television helped undermine a state that had long governed without consensus. Using a wide array of new archival sources and extensive interviews Savage illustrates how an increasingly confident television service upset political, religious and cultural elites who were profoundly uncomfortable with the changes taking place around them. Savage argues that during this period television was not a passive actor, but an active agent often times aggressively testing the limits of the medium and the patience of governments. Television helped facilitate a process of modernisation that slowly transformed Irish society during the 1960s. This book will be essential for those interested in contemporary Irish political and cultural history and readers interested in media history, and cultural studies. ;

    • Television

      Dai and Let Live

      by Dai Jones

    • Places & peoples: pictorial works
      June 2012

      The Oxford of Inspector Morse

      Including the Lewis Series Location Map & Oxford Walk

      by Antony Richards and Philip Attwell

      From The Ashmolean Museum to the White Horse public house, The Oxford of Inspector Morse, is the official guide published in conjunction with the Inspector Morse Society, and the companion to Inspector Morse on Location which covers all the locations outside of Oxford itself, and the original guide to the various Oxford locations most associated with the books and television productions of Inspector Morse as well as all six series of Lewis and not forgetting the new Endeavour film either. It not only gives the Morse and Lewis connections, but concentrates on the historical aspects to more than fifty places used in filming the adventures. Now in its 12th edition, regularly updated, fully illustrated, indexed by place and episode, and with a location map and Oxford walk, this publication featured at number six in the Blackwell's Bestseller List. A must for all Inspector Morse and Lewis enthusiasts.

    • Humour

      You Like That, Don't You?

      by Kelvin Nel

      A DELICIOUSLY DARK COMEDY Acclaimed Fifty-year old Broadway and Hollywood writer, Gavin De Jong, has returned to his old English coastal hometown resort of Southend-on-Sea, under a cloud of suspicion and scandal. De Jong’s life has everything one would expect from a man of his position: drama, travel, sex, laughter, media interest – even a touch of intrigue. But this was his life almost thirty years ago. Before he even became famous. During 1984, apart the minor issue of being associated with five deaths, young cinema projectionist, Gavin De Jong – a football mad, soul, funk and film buff – experiences an otherwise average year in Southend. Roll up; roll up for this seaside extravaganza! Laugh along with De Jong and his bunch of hilarious and eccentric friends, known as The First Team, as they create and perform in perhaps the worst band of all time, unaware that the consequences of their uniquely shambolic concert, will prove to be a deadly one. Gasp as De Jong earnestly juggles the mundane daily routine of his working life around two contrasting love affairs, while the shadows of a psychotic boss and a mysterious killer, stalk his every move. Marvel at how De Jong still manages to find the time, in the middle of all the bodies, to enjoy a roller coaster lifestyle of parties, drinking and nightclubs. And happily follow De Jong’s odyssey through 156 momentous days, until his devastating and tragic secret is revealed, in a heart-rending climax. A romantic and savagely funny satire on British youth culture and the pre-political correctness era of the 1980s, YOU LIKE THAT DON’T YOU? is often a harsh, lewd and challenging tale, full of symbolic imagery. THIS WAS NOT WHAT GEORGE ORWELL HAD FORESEEN FOR 1984

    • Films, cinema
      June 2009

      Midsomer Murders On Location

      by Sabine Schreiner & Joan Street

      A guide to the Midsomer counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Oxfordshire

    • Films, cinema
      June 2011

      Inspector Morse on Location

      by Antony Richards

      The Companion to the Original and Bestselling Guide to the Oxford of Inspector Morse Including Lewis Fully Illustrated with Location maps.

    • Television
      March 2012

      Life on Mars

      From Manchester to New York

      by Stephen Lacey (Author), Ruth McElroy (Author),

      A hybrid combination of 1970s police series and science fiction time travel, Life on Mars (Kudos/BBC Wales 2006-07) exemplifies the capacity of contemporary British television to find a loyal audience for work that it is innovative and unsettling. The programme rapidly garnered both critical and popular attention, regularly gaining in excess of 7m viewers. It was also screened internationally, including on US network television. An American remake was broadcast in 2008-9, and a Spanish version in 2008. Ashes to Ashes, the eagerly awaited follow-up to Life on Mars, ran for three series (2008 – 2010).

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