• Television

      Only Fools and Horses

      The Official Inside Story

      by Steve Clark

      At its height more than24 million peoplewatched the classic comedy seriesOnly Fools and Horses, making it Britain's most popular television programme ever. The hilarious exploits of wheeler-dealer Del Trotter and his dopey brother Rodney enthralled everyone from real market traders to members of the Royal Family. Only Fools and Horses - The Official Inside Storytakes us behind the scenes to reveal the secrets of the hit show and is fully authorised by the family of John Sullivan, the show's creator and writer. Containing in-depth interviews with the show's stars including Sir David Jason and Nicholas Lyndhurst and key members of the production team, this engaging tribute includes a comprehensive episode guide. It also reveals how the show was rejected when it was first offered to the BBC, how Sir David Jason nearly missed out on the starring role and the tragedy of the death of one of its stars during filming. Written by bestselling author Steve Clark, the only writer on set for the filming ofOnly Fools and Horses, spin-offThe Green Green Grassand prequelRock & Chips, the book gives a fascinating and unique insight into this legendary series.

    • Memoirs
      September 2013

      Through Grown-up Eyes

      Living with childhood fame

      by Robert Henrey

      Bobby Henrey was eight when he was improbably chosen by film director Carol Reed and producer Sir Alexander Korda to star alongside Sir Ralph Richardson in The Fallen Idol in 1948. The film was an instant success and his performance was singled out for critical acclaim and it remains one of the classics of British cinema. Through Grown-up Eyes is a remarkably moving and candid account of coping with childhood stardom and the vicissitudes of later life in the USA, tragedy and loss. It is ultimately about survival.

    • Film, TV & radio

      Catching Bullets

      Memoirs of a Bond Fan

      by Mark O'Connell

      When Jimmy O'Connell took a job as chauffeur for 007 producers Eon Productions, it would not just be Cubby Broccoli, Roger Moore and Sean Connery he would drive to James Bond his grandson Mark swiftly hitched a metaphorical ride too. In Catching Bullets: Memoirs of a Bond Fan, Mark O'Connell takes us on a humorous journey of filmic discovery where Bond films fire like bullets at a Thatcher era childhood, closeted adolescence and adult life as a comedy writer still inspired by that Broccoli movie magic. Catching Bullets is a unique and sharply-observed love-letter to James Bond, Duran Duran title songs and bolting down your tea quick enough to watch Roger Moore falling out of a plane without a parachute.

    • Film scripts & screenplays

      Meadowlark

      by Christine Horner

      FEATURE FILM SCREENPLAY -- Crystal True is a self-invented psychic with a secret. Rising above less-than-mediocrity to become the darling of her small Midwest town, Crystal faces a dark night of the soul when she loses her supernatural gifts and her identity. Unable to hold down a job in the “real” world, she heads out to snowbird country on a lark as the new activities director at The Meadows. With only instinct to rely upon, Crystal reluctantly teams up with a quirky bunch of residents and an archeologist son to investigate Meadows' shenanigans, when instead, she learns to follow her heart, uncovering the family she always dreamed of having.

    • The Arts
      November 2019

      Masks in Horror Cinema

      Eyes Without Faces

      by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

      Why has the mask been such an enduring generic motif in horror cinema? This book explores its transformative potential historically across myriad cultures, particularly in relation to its ritual and myth-making capacities, and its intersection with power, ideology and identity. All of these factors have a direct impact on mask-centric horror cinema: meanings, values and rituals associated with masks evolve and are updated in horror cinema to reflect new contexts, rendering the mask a persistent, meaningful and dynamic aspect of the genre’s iconography. This study debates horror cinema’s durability as a site for the potency of the mask’s broader symbolic power to be constantly re-explored, re-imagined and re-invented as an object of cross-cultural and ritual significance that existed long before the moving image culture of cinema.

    • Film: styles & genres

      Apocalypse-Cinema

      2012 and Other Ends of the World

      by Peter Szendy, Translated by Will Bishop

      Apocalypse-cinema is not only the end of time that has so often been staged as spectacle in films like 2012, The Day After Tomorrow, and The Terminator. By looking at blockbusters that play with general annihilation while also paying close attention to films like Melancholia, Cloverfield, Blade Runner, and Twelve Monkeys, this book suggests that in the apocalyptic genre, film gnaws at its own limit. Apocalypse-cinema is, at the same time and with the same double blow, the end of the world and the end of the film. It is the consummation and the (self-)consumption of cinema, in the form of an acinema that Lyotard evoked as the nihilistic horizon of filmic economy. The innumerable countdowns, dazzling radiations, freeze-overs, and seismic cracks and crevices are but other names and pretexts for staging film itself, with its economy of time and its rewinds, its overexposed images and fades to white, its freeze-frames and digital touch-ups. The apocalyptic genre is not just one genre among others: It plays with the very conditions of possibility of cinema. And it bears witness to the fact that, every time, in each and every film, what Jean-Luc Nancy called the cine-world is exposed on the verge of disappearing. In a Postface specially written for the English edition, Szendy extends his argument into a debate with speculative materialism. Apocalypse-cinema, he argues, announces itself as cinders that question the “ultratestimonial” structure of the filmic gaze. The cine-eye, he argues, eludes the correlationism and anthropomorphic structure that speculative materialists have placed under critique, allowing only the ashes it bears to be heard.

    • Film: styles & genres

      Apocalypse-Cinema

      2012 and Other Ends of the World

      by Peter Szendy, Translated by Will Bishop

      Apocalypse-cinema is not only the end of time that has so often been staged as spectacle in films like 2012, The Day After Tomorrow, and The Terminator. By looking at blockbusters that play with general annihilation while also paying close attention to films like Melancholia, Cloverfield, Blade Runner, and Twelve Monkeys, this book suggests that in the apocalyptic genre, film gnaws at its own limit. Apocalypse-cinema is, at the same time and with the same double blow, the end of the world and the end of the film. It is the consummation and the (self-)consumption of cinema, in the form of an acinema that Lyotard evoked as the nihilistic horizon of filmic economy. The innumerable countdowns, dazzling radiations, freeze-overs, and seismic cracks and crevices are but other names and pretexts for staging film itself, with its economy of time and its rewinds, its overexposed images and fades to white, its freeze-frames and digital touch-ups. The apocalyptic genre is not just one genre among others: It plays with the very conditions of possibility of cinema. And it bears witness to the fact that, every time, in each and every film, what Jean-Luc Nancy called the cine-world is exposed on the verge of disappearing. In a Postface specially written for the English edition, Szendy extends his argument into a debate with speculative materialism. Apocalypse-cinema, he argues, announces itself as cinders that question the “ultratestimonial” structure of the filmic gaze. The cine-eye, he argues, eludes the correlationism and anthropomorphic structure that speculative materialists have placed under critique, allowing only the ashes it bears to be heard.

    • Film: styles & genres

      Apocalypse-Cinema

      2012 and Other Ends of the World

      by Peter Szendy, Translated by Will Bishop

      Apocalypse-cinema is not only the end of time that has so often been staged as spectacle in films like 2012, The Day After Tomorrow, and The Terminator. By looking at blockbusters that play with general annihilation while also paying close attention to films like Melancholia, Cloverfield, Blade Runner, and Twelve Monkeys, this book suggests that in the apocalyptic genre, film gnaws at its own limit. Apocalypse-cinema is, at the same time and with the same double blow, the end of the world and the end of the film. It is the consummation and the (self-)consumption of cinema, in the form of an acinema that Lyotard evoked as the nihilistic horizon of filmic economy. The innumerable countdowns, dazzling radiations, freeze-overs, and seismic cracks and crevices are but other names and pretexts for staging film itself, with its economy of time and its rewinds, its overexposed images and fades to white, its freeze-frames and digital touch-ups. The apocalyptic genre is not just one genre among others: It plays with the very conditions of possibility of cinema. And it bears witness to the fact that, every time, in each and every film, what Jean-Luc Nancy called the cine-world is exposed on the verge of disappearing. In a Postface specially written for the English edition, Szendy extends his argument into a debate with speculative materialism. Apocalypse-cinema, he argues, announces itself as cinders that question the “ultratestimonial” structure of the filmic gaze. The cine-eye, he argues, eludes the correlationism and anthropomorphic structure that speculative materialists have placed under critique, allowing only the ashes it bears to be heard.

    • Films, cinema
      May 2011

      From Silver Screen to Spanish Stage

      The humorists of the Madrid vanguardia and Hollywood film

      by Stuart Nishan Green (Author)

      The work of the humorists of the Madrid vanguardia continues to be enjoyed in the Hispanic world and to be explored by scholars of modern culture in Spain. Yet virtually no academic attention has been paid to them in Engish-speaking academe. This is the first book-length study of the group as a whole, and analyses their responses in print and on stage to Hollywood film from the 1920s to the 1960s, a feature of their work often signalled but never examined in detail. With the advent of the talkie and the raising of the language barrier, Hollywood studios recruited writers from continental Europe to work on foreign-language versions of certain titles. Thus Tono, Edgar Neville, Enrique Jardiel Poncela and José López Rubio came to experience Hollywood first-hand. These four humorists and colleague Miguel Mihura had already established a reputation in Spain with prose writings and plays inspired by the avant-garde. Subsequently, they sought to innovate by exploiting Hollywood cinema’s visual style, narrative verve and madcap gags in their theatre. Drawing on archival work, the methodologies of theatre and film studies, and scholarly writings on Hollywood genres and stars, this book examines the humorists’ experiments on stage as the most significant early case in Spain of the ‘remediation’ of cinema and of what Philip Auslander describes as the ‘media epistemology’ generated by Hollywood’s immense popularity. It contextualises the humorists’ opinions and representations of the US and domestic film industries with reference to contemporary attitudes, outlines and implements a framework for the systematic study of ‘remediation’ in the humorists’ stage adaptations of films and original plays, and traces the influence of Charlie Chaplin and the Marx Brothers in their comic devices. The curtailing of such experimentation shortly into the Franco dictatorship exemplifies the conservatism of this period of Spanish culture.

    • Films, cinema
      October 2008

      Between Page and Screen

      Remaking Literature Through Cinema and Cyberspace

      by Edited by Kiene Brillenburg Wurth

    • Films, cinema
      October 2008

      Between Page and Screen

      Remaking Literature Through Cinema and Cyberspace

      by Edited by Kiene Brillenburg Wurth

    • Films, cinema

      Reversing the Lens

      Ethnicity, Race, Gender, & Sexuality Through Film

      by Jun Xing (Editor) , Lane R Hirabayashi (Editor)

      This book brings together noted scholars in history, anthropology, sociology, ethnic studies and film studies to promote film as a powerful classroom tool that can be used to foster cross-cultural communication with respect to race and ethnicity. Through such films as: Skin Deep; Slaying the Dragon; and Mississippi Masala; contributors demonstrate why and how visual media help delineate various forms of critical visual thinking and examine how radicalisation is either sedimented or contested in the popular imagination. Not limited to classroom use, the book is relevant to anyone who is curious about how video and film can be utilised to expose race as a social construction that -- in dialogue with other potential forms of difference -- is subject to political contestation.

    • Films, cinema

      Images of Incarceration

      Representations of Prison in Film and Television Drama

      by David Wilson (Author), Sean O'Sullivan (Author)

      Part of the Prison Film Project sponsored by the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation under its Rethinking Crime and Punishment initiative, this title compares fictional representations with 'actual existing reality' to provide insights into how screen images affect understanding of complex social and penal issues: 'Do viewers separate fact from fiction?'

    • Films, cinema

      Shooting Cowboys and Indians

      Silent Western Films, American Culture, and the Birth of Hollywood

      by Andrew Brodie Smith

      Academics have generally dismissed Hollywood's cowboy and Indian movies -- one of its defining successful genres -- as specious, one-dimensional, and crassly commercial. In this book, Andrew Brodie Smith challenges this simplistic characterisation of the genre, illustrating the complex and sometimes contentious process by which business interests commercialised images of the West. Tracing the western from its hazy silent-picture origins in the 1890s to the advent of talking pictures in the 1920s, Smith examines the ways in which silent westerns contributed to the overall development of the film industry. Focusing on such early important production companies as Selig Polyscope, New York Motion Picture, and Essanay, Smith revises current thinking about the birth of Hollywood and the establishment of Los Angeles as the nexus of filmmaking in the United States. Smith also reveals the role silent westerns played in the creation of the white male screen hero that dominated American popular culture in the twentieth century. Illustrated with dozens of historic photos and movie stills, this engaging and substantive story will appeal to scholars interested in Western history, film history, and film studies as well as general readers hoping to learn more about this little-known chapter in popular filmmaking.

    • Humour

      You Like That, Don't You?

      by Kelvin Nel

      A DELICIOUSLY DARK COMEDY Acclaimed Fifty-year old Broadway and Hollywood writer, Gavin De Jong, has returned to his old English coastal hometown resort of Southend-on-Sea, under a cloud of suspicion and scandal. De Jong’s life has everything one would expect from a man of his position: drama, travel, sex, laughter, media interest – even a touch of intrigue. But this was his life almost thirty years ago. Before he even became famous. During 1984, apart the minor issue of being associated with five deaths, young cinema projectionist, Gavin De Jong – a football mad, soul, funk and film buff – experiences an otherwise average year in Southend. Roll up; roll up for this seaside extravaganza! Laugh along with De Jong and his bunch of hilarious and eccentric friends, known as The First Team, as they create and perform in perhaps the worst band of all time, unaware that the consequences of their uniquely shambolic concert, will prove to be a deadly one. Gasp as De Jong earnestly juggles the mundane daily routine of his working life around two contrasting love affairs, while the shadows of a psychotic boss and a mysterious killer, stalk his every move. Marvel at how De Jong still manages to find the time, in the middle of all the bodies, to enjoy a roller coaster lifestyle of parties, drinking and nightclubs. And happily follow De Jong’s odyssey through 156 momentous days, until his devastating and tragic secret is revealed, in a heart-rending climax. A romantic and savagely funny satire on British youth culture and the pre-political correctness era of the 1980s, YOU LIKE THAT DON’T YOU? is often a harsh, lewd and challenging tale, full of symbolic imagery. THIS WAS NOT WHAT GEORGE ORWELL HAD FORESEEN FOR 1984

    • Films, cinema
      July 2013

      James Bond on Location

      Volume 1: London

      by J.P.Sperati

      Published in July 2013 this unofficial review covers the film locations for the entire James Bond film series from Dr. No to Skyfall, including Never Say Never Again and some bonus places associated with Ian Fleming and even Aston Martin. 160 full colour pages with 100 photographs.

    • Films, cinema
      May 2010

      Harry Potter on Location

      An Unofficial Review and Guide to the Locations Used for the Entire Film Series

      by J. P. Sperati

      Have you ever wondered where the filming locations are for the Harry Potter film series? Here for the first time, arranged by county, is the definitive guide from ‘A’ for Alnwick Castle to ‘Z’ for Zoological Society of London to over of those 70 locations along with over 160 photographs, maps, anecdotes and a wealth of historical information to bring them to life. Also included in this publication are tips and recommendations for those wishing to plan their own exploration of these wonderful places. This book will give the reader an appreciation for how the films are constructed from a variety of different sources and spliced together so that the final result appears as just one seamless magical moment on the big screen. This guide is a must for all Harry Potter enthusiasts as well as those just wishing to visit some of the most beautiful locations in the UK.

    • Films, cinema
      June 2009

      Midsomer Murders On Location

      by Sabine Schreiner & Joan Street

      A guide to the Midsomer counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Oxfordshire

    • Films, cinema
      June 2011

      Inspector Morse on Location

      by Antony Richards

      The Companion to the Original and Bestselling Guide to the Oxford of Inspector Morse Including Lewis Fully Illustrated with Location maps.

    • Films, cinema
      January 2013

      James Bond on Location, Volume 2: U.K. (excluding London)

      An Unofficial Review & Guide to the Locations Used for the Entire Film Series from Dr. No to Skyfall

      by J. P. Sperati

      The James Bond films are famous for their exotic locations, matching and even surpassing the settings of Ian Fleming’s original novels. But all is not what it seems! (It rarely is in the cinema.) The gold-obsessed villain’s factory in Goldfinger – Switzerland or Buckinghamshire? The hovercraft chase in Die Another Day – North Korea or Oxfordshire? The U.S. air base in Tomorrow Never Dies – the South China Sea or Suffolk? The chase around the airport in Casino Royale – Miami or Surrey? Max Zorin’s mine in A View to a Kill – California or Sussex? The explosive climax of From Russia with Love – the Adriatic coast or Argyll? The oil pipeline in The World Is not Enough – Azerbaijan or Snowdonia? Those snowy scenes in Quantum of Solace – Tatarstan or Hampshire? J. P. Sperati’s intensively researched and lavishly illustrated book is the perfect guide to the British locations of all the official James Bond movies, from Doctor No to SkyFall – including the sound stage built for The Spy Who Loved Me at Pinewood, and the entire studio built for GoldenEye. Complete with historical information, many rare photographs, indexes and maps. A must for all James Bond Enthusiasts.

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