• Film theory & criticism
      September 2017

      Screening Statues

      Sculpture and Cinema

      by Steven Jacobs, Susan Felleman, Vito Adriaensens, Lisa Colpaert

      Screening Statues: Sculpture and Cinema is the first book to focus on the relationship between sculpture and the silver screen. It covers a broad range of magical, mystical and phenomenological interactions between the two media, from early film’s eroticized tableaux vivants to enigmatic sculptures in modernist cinema. Sculptures are literally brought to life on the silver screen, while living people are turned into, or trapped inside, statuary. The book examines key sculptural motifs and cinematic sculpture in film history through a series of case studies and through an extensive reference gallery of 150 different films. Considering the work of directors like Georges Méliès, Jean Cocteau and Alain Resnais, as well as films like House of Wax, Jason and the Argonauts and Clash of the Titans, this is an innovative exploration of two different media, their artistic traditions and their respective theoretical paradigms. ; This book examines key sculptural motifs and cinematic sculpture in film history through a series of case studies and through an extensive reference gallery of 150 different films. ; Acknowledgements Introduction: The Marble Camera, Steven Jacobs PART I: ESSAYS 1. The Sculptor’s Dream: Living Statues in Early Cinema, Vito Adriaensens and Steven Jacobs 2. The Mystery…The Blood…the Age of Gold: Sculpture in Surrealist and Surreal Cinema, Susan Felleman 3. Carving Cameras on Thorvaldsen and Rodin: Mid-Twentieth-Century Documentaries on Sculpture, Steven Jacobs 4. Mysteries of the Wax Museum: Anatomy of an Ovidian Cinema, Vito Adriaensens 5. The Night of the Human Body: Statues and Fantasy in Post-War American Cinema, Susan Felleman 6. From Pompei to Marienbad: Classical Sculpture in Post-War European Modernist Cinema, Steven Jacobs and Lisa Colpaert 7. Of Swords, Sandals, and Statues: The Myth of the Living Statue from Hephaistos to the Silver Screen, Vito Adriaensens 8. Coda: Returning the Favor (A Short History of Film Becoming Sculpture), Susan Felleman PART II: SCULPTURE GALLERY Vito Adriaensens and Lisa Colpaert Bibliography About the Authors Index

    • Documentary films
      March 2017

      Negotiating Dissidence

      The Pioneering Women of Arab Documentary

      by Stefanie Van de Peer

      In spite of harsh censorship, conservative morals and a lack of investment, women documentarists in the Arab world have found ways to subtly negotiate dissidence in their films, something that is becoming more apparent since the ‘Arab Revolutions’. In this book, Stefanie Van de Peer traces the very beginnings of Arab women making documentaries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), from the 1970s and 1980s in Egypt and Lebanon, to the 1990s and 2000s in Morocco and Syria. Supporting a historical overview of the documentary form in the Arab world with a series of in-depth case studies, Van de Peer looks at the work of pioneering figures like Ateyyat El Abnoudy, the ‘mother of Egyptian documentary’, Tunisia’s Selma Baccar and the Palestinian filmmaker Mai Masri. Addressing the context of the films’ production, distribution and exhibition, the book also asks why these women held on to the ideals of a type of filmmaking that was unlikely to be accepted by the censor, and looks at precisely how the women documentarists managed to frame expressions of dissent with the tools available to the documentary maker. ; Traces the very beginnings of Arab women making documentaries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), from the 1970s and 1980s in Egypt and Lebanon, to the 1990s and 2000s in Morocco and Syria. ; List of Images; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1: Ateyyat El Abnoudy: Poetic Realism in Egyptian Documentaries; 2: Jocelyne Saab: Artistic-Journalistic Documentaries in Lebanese Times of War; 3: Selma Baccar: Nonfiction in Tunisia, the Land of Fictions; 4: Assia Djebar: Algerian images-son in Experimental Documentaries; 5: Mai Masri: Mothering Filmmakers in Palestinian Revolutionary Cinema; 6: Izza Génini: The Performance of Heritage in Moroccan Music Documentaries; 7: Hala Alabdallah Yakoub: Documentary as Poetic Subjective Experience in Syria; Works Cited ; List of ImagesAcknowledgementsIntroduction Chapter 1: Ateyyat El Abnoudy: Poetic Realism in Egyptian DocumentariesChapter 2: Jocelyne Saab: Artistic-Journalistic Documentaries in Lebanese Times of WarChapter 3: Selma Baccar: Nonfiction in Tunisia, the Land of FictionsChapter 4: Assia Djebar: Algerian images-son in Experimental DocumentariesChapter 5: Mai Masri: Mothering Filmmakers in Palestinian Revolutionary CinemaChapter 6: Izza Génini: The Performance of Heritage in Moroccan Music DocumentariesChapter 7: Hala Alabdallah Yakoub: Documentary as Poetic Subjective Experience in SyriaWorks Cited

    • Individual film directors, film-makers
      June 2017

      Aesthetics, Ethics and Trauma in the Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar

      by Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla

      One of Spain’s most celebrated directors, Pedro Almodóvar has won international recognition for his dark comedy-dramas like Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, All About My Mother and Volver. Reconceptualising Almodóvar’s films as theoretical and political resources, this innovative book examines a neglected aspect of his cinema: its engagement with the traumatic past, with subjective and collective memory, and with the ethical and political meanings that result from this engagement. With close readings of Almodóvar’s films from the 1990s and 2000s, including Bad Education and The Skin I Live In, Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla explores how Almodóvar’s cinema mourns and witnesses the traces of trauma, drawing on theoretical approaches from trauma studies, psychoanalysis, philosophy, film studies and visual studies to suggest that his work proposes an ethical model based on our compassionate relations to others, and envisions a world co-inhabited by plurality and difference. ; Reconceptualising Almodóvar’s films as theoretical and political resources, this innovative book examines a neglected aspect of his cinema: its engagement with the traumatic past, with subjective and collective memory, and with the ethical and political meanings that result from this engagement. ; AcknowledgementsIntroduction: Encountering the Trace1. Im-Possibility of Not-Returning: Volver2. Im-Possibility of Not-Sharing: Todo sobre mi madre3. Im-Possibility of Not-Writing Otherwise: La mala educación4. Im-Possibility of Not-Succumbing: La piel que habitoNotesReferencesIndex

    • Film theory & criticism
      July 2017

      Female Stars of British Cinema

      The Women in Question

      by Melanie Williams

      Film stars are often seen as a Hollywood creation but this book explores how British cinema developed its own culture of stardom, and how its female stars have been prized by audiences worldwide. Female Stars of British Cinema uses case studies of seven female stars whose careers span the 1940s to the present day – Jean Kent, Diana Dors, Rita Tushingham, Glenda Jackson, Helena Bonham Carter, Emily Lloyd, and Judi Dench – to explore how British star femininities have developed over time, and how the image of the British female star has responded to broader social and cultural changes. These ‘women in question’ offer a way into the complexities of British cinema’s culture of stardom which has sometimes espoused glamour and sometimes rejected it, and is entangled with issues of regional, national and ethnic identity, as well as class, sexuality and age. Exploring and investigating the variety of British star femininities over the last seventy-five years, this book also interrogates the omissions and absences from that same cinematic firmament. ; Female Stars of British Cinema uses case studies of seven female stars whose careers span the 1940s to the present day – Jean Kent, Diana Dors, Rita Tushingham, Glenda Jackson, Helena Bonham Carter, Emily Lloyd, and Judi Dench – to explore how British star femininities have developed over time. ; List of figures; Acknowledgements; 1: Introduction: questions of female stardom in British cinema; 2: ‘A girl appears in camiknickers’: Jean Kent’s austerity stardom; 3: ‘Blonde glamour machine’: Diana Dors in the 1950s and beyond; 4: British new waif: Rita Tushingham and sixties female stardom; 5: ‘A constant threat’: Glenda Jackson and the challenges of seventies stardom; 6: ‘From schoolgirl to stardom’: the discovery and development of Helena Bonham Carter and Emily Lloyd in the 1980s and 1990s; 7: National treasure: Judi Dench and older female stardom into the 2000s; 8: Conclusion: the unbearable whiteness of being (a female British star); Bibliography ; List of figuresAcknowledgements1. Introduction: questions of female stardom in British cinema 2. ‘A girl appears in camiknickers’: Jean Kent’s austerity stardom3. ‘Blonde glamour machine’: Diana Dors in the 1950s and beyond4. British new waif: Rita Tushingham and sixties female stardom5. ‘A constant threat’: Glenda Jackson and the challenges of seventies stardom6. ‘From schoolgirl to stardom’: the discovery and development of Helena Bonham Carter and Emily Lloyd in the 1980s and 1990s7. National treasure: Judi Dench and older female stardom into the 2000s8. Conclusion: the unbearable whiteness of being (a female British star)Bibliography

    • Films, cinema
      August 2017

      Indefinite Visions

      Cinema and the Attractions of Uncertainty

      by Martine Beugnet, Allan Cameron, Arild Fetveit

      Moving image culture seems to privilege the instantly identifiable: the recognizable face, the well-timed stunt, the perfectly synchronized line of dialogue. Yet perfect, in-focus visibility does not come ‘naturally’ to the moving image, and if there is one visual effect the eye of the camera can record better than the human eye it is blur. Looking beyond popular media to works of experimental cinema and video art, this groundbreaking collection addresses the aesthetics and politics of moving images in states of decay, distortion, indistinctness and fragmentation. A range of international scholars examines what is at stake in these images’ sometimes radical foregrounding of materiality and mediation, or of evanescence and spectrality, as well as their challenging of the dominant position accorded to ‘legible’ images. How have artists and filmmakers rendered the ‘indefinite’ image, and what questions does it pose? With a range of approaches, from aesthetics to phenomenology to production studies, the authors in this volume investigate techniques, themes and concepts that emerge from this wilful excavation of the moving image’s material base. ; With a range of approaches, from aesthetics to phenomenology to production studies, the authors in this volume investigate techniques, themes and concepts that emerge from this wilful excavation of the moving image’s material base. ; Indefinite Visions: Cinema and the Attractions of Uncertainty Martine Beugnet - Introduction Illuminations Jacques Aumont – The Veiled Image: The Luminous Formless Richard Misek – The Black Screen Tom Gunning – Flicker and Shutter: Exploring Cinema’s Shuddering Shadow Definitions Martin Jay – Genres of Blur Giusy Pisano – In Praise of the Sound Dissolve: Evanescences, Uncertainties, Fusions, Resonances Erika Balsom – 100 Years of Low Definition Frames Michel Chion – Jumps in Scale Julian Hanich – Reflecting on Reflections: Complex Mirror Shots in Films Christa Blümlinger – Cinematic Indeterminacy According to Peter Tscherkassky: Coming Attractions Carol Vernallis – Baz Luhrmann’s Audiovisual Sublime: Partying in The Great Gatsby Temporalities D.N.Rodowick – The Force of Small Gestures Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli – Bill Viola and the Cinema of Indefinite Bodily Experience Catherine Fowler – Slow Looking: Confronting Moving Images with Didi-Huberman Materialities Kim Knowles – (Re)visioning Celluloid: Aesthetics of Contact in Materialist Film Emmanuelle André – Seeing through the Fingertips Raymond Bellour – Homo Animalis Kino Glitches Sean Cubitt – Temporalities of the Glitch: Déjà Vu Steven Shaviro – The Glitch Dimension: Paranormal Activity and the Technologies of Vision Allan Cameron – Facing the Glitch: Abstraction, Abjection and the Digital Image

    • Film theory & criticism
      March 2017

      Transnational Film Remakes

      by Iain Robert Smith, Constantine Verevis

      What happens when a film is remade in another national context? How do notions of translation, adaptation and localisation help us understand the cultural dynamics of these shifts, and in what ways does a transnational perspective offer us a deeper understanding of film remaking? Bringing together a range of international scholars, Transnational Film Remakes is the first edited collection to specifically focus on the phenomenon of cross-cultural remakes. Using a variety of case studies, from Hong Kong remakes of Japanese cinema to Bollywood remakes of Australian television, this book provides an analysis of cinematic remaking that moves beyond Hollywood to address the truly global nature of this phenomenon. Looking at iconic contemporary titles such as The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Oldboy, as well as classics like La Bête Humaine and La Chienne, this book interrogates the fluid and dynamic ways in which texts are adapted and reworked across national borders to provide a distinctive new model for understanding these global cultural borrowings. ; Bringing together a range of international scholars, Transnational Film Remakes is the first edited collection to specifically focus on the phenomenon of cross-cultural remakes. ; Introduction: Transnational Film Remakes, Iain Robert Smith and Constantine Verevis PART I: GENRES AND TRADITIONS1. Disrupting the Remake: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Lucy Mazdon2. Fritz Lang Remakes Jean Renoir for Hollywood: Film Noir in Three National Voices, R. Barton Palmer3. The Cultural Politics of Re-making Spanish Horror films in the Twenty-First Century: Quarantine and Come Out and Play, Andy Willis 4. ‘For the Dead Travel Fast’: The Transnational Afterlives of Dracula, Iain Robert Smith PART II: GENDER AND PERFORMANCE5. The Chinese Cinematic Remake as Transnational Appeal: Zhang Yimou’s A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop, Kenneth Chan6. Transformation and Glamour in the Cross-Cultural Makeover: Return to Eden, Khoon Bhari Maang and the Avenging Woman in Popular Hindi Cinema, Michael Lawrence7. Translating Cool: Cinematic Exchange between Hong Kong, Hollywood, and Bollywood, Rashna Wadia Richards8. Trading Places: Das doppelte Lottchen and The Parent Trap, Constantine Verevis PART III: AUTEURS AND CRITICS9. A Tale of Two Balloons: Intercultural Cinema and Transnational Nostalgia in Le voyage du ballon rouge, David Scott Diffrient and Carl R. Burgchardt10. ‘Crazed Heat’: Nakahira Ko and the Transnational Self-Remake, David Desser11. Remaking Funny Games: Michael Haneke’s Cross-Cultural Experiment, Kathleen Loock 12. Reinterpreting Revenge: Authorship, Excess, and the Critical Reception of Spike Lee’s Oldboy, Daniel Martin 13. The Transnational Film Remake in the American Press, Daniel Herbert Contributors Notes

    • Film theory & criticism
      September 2017

      American Independent Cinema

      Second Edition

      by Yannis Tzioumakis

      This introduction to American Independent Cinema offers both a comprehensive industrial and economic history of the sector from the early twentieth century to the present and a study of key individual films, filmmakers and film companies. Ordered chronologically, beginning with independent filmmaking in the studio era (examining both top-rank and low-end independent film production), moving to the 1950s and 1960s (discussing both the adoption of independent filmmaking as the main method of production as well as exploitation filmmaking) and finishing with contemporary American independent cinema (exploring areas such as the New Hollywood, the rise of mini-major and major independent companies and the institutionalisation of independent cinema in the 1990s), readers will develop an understanding of the complex dynamic relations between independent and mainstream American cinema. Thoroughly updated to include developments from the mid-2000s onwards, this second edition includes new case studies, a new chapter on American Independent Cinema in the Age of Media Convergence, a new prologue and an enhanced epilogue and bibliography. Each chapter includes case studies focusing on specific films or filmmakers, and independent production and distribution companies are discussed throughout the text. ; This introduction to American Independent Cinema offers both a comprehensive industrial and economic history of the sector from the early twentieth century to the present and a study of key individual films, filmmakers and film companies. ; Analytical Table of Contents; List of Tables; List of Case Studies; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; Prologue to the 2nd Edition; Introduction: Problems of Definition and the Discourse of American Independent Cinema; Part I: American Independent Cinema in the Studio Years (mid-1920s–late 1940s); 1: Independent Filmmaking in the Studio Era: Tendencies within the Studio System; 2: Independent Filmmaking in the Studio Era: The Poverty Row Studios (1930–50s); Part II: American Independent Cinema in the post-Studio Era (late 1940s–late 1960s); 3: Independence by Force: The Effects of the Paramount Decree on Independent Film Production; 4: An Audience for the Independents: Exploitation Films for the Nation’s Youth; Part III: American Independent Cinema and the ‘New Hollywood' (late 1960s–late 1970s); 5: The New Hollywood and the Independent Hollywood; 6: American Independent Cinema in the Age of the Conglomerates; Part IV: Contemporary American Independent Cinema (early 1980s-present); 7: Mini-majors and Major Independents; 8: The Institutionalisation of American Independent Cinema; 9: American Independent Cinema in the Age of Media Convergence; Epilogue to the 2nd Edition: From Independent Cinema to Specialty Content; Bibliography; Index ; List of TablesList of Case StudiesList of FiguresAcknowledgementsPrologue to the 2nd EditionIntroduction: Problems of Definition and the Discourse of American Independent Cinema Part I: American Independent Cinema in the Studio Years (mid-1920s–late 1940s)1: Independent Filmmaking in the Studio Era: Tendencies within the Studio System2: Independent Filmmaking in the Studio Era: The Poverty Row Studios (1930–50s) Part II: American Independent Cinema in the post-Studio Era (late 1940s–late 1960s)3: Independence by Force: The Effects of the Paramount Decree on Independent Film Production4: An Audience for the Independents: Exploitation Films for the Nation’s Youth Part III: American Independent Cinema and the ‘New Hollywood' (late 1960s–late 1970s)5: The New Hollywood and the Independent Hollywood6: American Independent Cinema in the Age of the Conglomerates Part IV: Contemporary American Independent Cinema (early 1980s-present)7: Mini-majors and Major Independents8: The Institutionalisation of American Independent Cinema9: American Independent Cinema in the Age of Media Convergence Epilogue to the 2nd Edition: From Independent Cinema to Specialty ContentBibliographyIndex

    • Documentary films
      January 2018

      Female Authorship and the Documentary Image

      Theory, Practice and Aesthetics

      by Boel Ulfsdotter, Anna Backman Rogers

      This book, like its twin volume Female Authorship and Documentary Strategies, centres on pressing issues in relation to female authorship in contemporary documentary practices. Addressing the politics of representation and authorship both behind and in front of the camera, a range of international scholars now expand the theoretical and practical framework informing the current scholarship on documentary cinema, which has so far neglected questions of gender. Female Authorship and the Documentary Image engages with the relationship between female documentary filmmakers and the documentary image. With a thematic focus on the documentary image directly, within the more traditional arenas of theory and practice and especially within the context of gaze and author theory, the book also considers more philosophical questions of aesthetics, home and identity within the contexts of female subjectivity, globalisation and trauma. The book also includes a dialogue on two key photographers, Hannah Wilke and Jo Spence, as well as an interview with Taiwanese documentary filmmakers Singing Chen and Wuna Wu. ; Addressing the politics of representation and authorship both behind and in front of the camera, a range of international scholars explore the pressing issues in relation to female authorship in contemporary documentary practices. ; Preface by Belinda Smaill Introduction by Boel Ulfsdotter and Anna Backman Rogers Section one: DOCUMENTARY PRACTICESChapter 1: LISA FRENCH: "Women in the Director’s Chair: The Female Gaze in Documentary Film"Chapter 2: ELIZABETH COFFMAN AND ERICA STEIN: "New Day Films: Collective Aesthetics and the Collection"Chapter 3: SHARON DANIEL: "The Female Auteur and Voice: A Personal Context"Interview: "The Final Projects of Hannah Wilke and Jo Spence": A dialogue between Elena Crippa and Anna Backman Rogers Section two: DOCUMENTARY THEORIESChapter 4: GABRIELLE MCNALLY: "The Feminist Voice: Improvisation in Women’s Autobiographical Filmmaking"Chapter 5: RONA MURRAY: "Speaking About or Speaking Nearby? Documentary Practice and Female Authorship in the films of Kim Longinotto"Chapter 6: APARNA SHARMA: "A Politics of Nearness: Uses of Montage and Haptics in Documenting Cultural Experiences of Communities of India" Section three: FEMALE AUTHORSHIP AND GLOBAL IDENTITIESChapter 7: ANNELIES VAN NOORTWIJK: "The Other, The Same: Towards a Metamodern Poetics with Heddy Honigmann"Chapter 8: BOEL ULFSDOTTER: "The Memories of Belleville Baby: Autofiction as Evidence"Chapter 9: SOPHIE MAYER: "To::For::By::About::With::From:: Towards Solid Women: On (not) Being Addressed by Tracey Moffatt’s Moodeijt Yorgas"Chapter 10: WAKAE NAKANE: "Constructing an Intimate Sphere Through Her Own Female Body: Naomi Kawase’s Documentary Films"Chapter 11: CATHERINE SUMMERHAYES: "Celebrity/Activist/Photographer: Mia Farrow"Interview: "Being a Woman Documentary Maker in Taiwan": An interview with Singing Chen and Wuna Wu, by Chris Berry

    • Documentary films
      January 2018

      Female Agency and Documentary Strategies

      Subjectivities, Identity and Activism

      by Boel Ulfsdotter, Anna Backman Rogers

      This book, like its twin volume Female Authorship and the Documentary Image, centres on pressing issues in relation to female authorship in contemporary documentary practices. Addressing the politics of representation and authorship both behind and in front of the camera, a range of international scholars now expand the theoretical and practical framework informing the current scholarship on documentary cinema, which has so far neglected questions of gender. Female Agency and Documentary Strategies centres on how self-portraiture and contemporary documentary manifestations such as blogging and the prevalent usage of social media shape and inform female subjectivities and claims to truth. The book examines the scope of authorship and agency open to women using these technologies as a form of activism, centring on notions of relationality, selfhood and subjectivity, and includes interviews with Hong Kong based activist filmmaker and scholar Vivian Wenli Lin and Spanish documentarist Mercedes Alvarez. ; Female Agency and Documentary Strategies centres on how self-portraiture and contemporary documentary manifestations such as blogging and the prevalent usage of social media shape and inform female subjectivities and claims to truth. ; Preface Kate Nash Introduction Boel Ulfsdotter and Anna Backman Rogers Section one: NEW MEDIA AND ACTIVISMChapter 1: KRISTOPHER FALLON: "The Pencil of Identity: Instagram as Inadvertent (Female) Autobiography"Chapter 2: CADENCE KINSEY: "Archetype and Authenticity: Reflections on Amalia Ulman’s Excellences and Perfections"Chapter 3: MONICA TITTON: "Blogging the Female Self: Authorship, Self-Performance and Identity Politics in Fashion Blogs" Section two: RELATIONALITY, SELFHOOD AND SUBJECTIVITIESChapter 4: GAIL VANSTONE: "‘Scriptrix Narrans’ – Digital Documentary Storytelling’s Radical Potential"Chapter 5: KIM MUNRO: "Hybrid Practices and Voice-Making in Contemporary Female Documentary Film" Chapter 6: KERREEN ELY-HARPER: "Record Keeping: Family Memories on Film – Rea Tajiri’s History and Memory: For Akiko and Takashig and Wisdom Gone Wild"Chapter 7: ANNA BACKMAN ROGERS: "Not Because My Heart Is Gone; Simply The Other Side": Francesca Woodman’s Relational and Ephemeral Subjectivity at the Limit of the Image"Chapter 8: CARLA MAIA: "Other Women: Thinking Class and Gender in Contemporary Interview: "Visualising Our Voices": Hong Kong Scholar and Film Director Vivian Wenli Lin, in Conversation With Boel Ulfsdotter" Section three: IDENTITY POLITICS OF DOCUMENTARYChapter 9: ANNA MISIAK: "From Visceral Style to Discourse of Resistance": Reading Alka Sadat’s Afghan Documentaries on Violence Against Women"Chapter 10: JOHN A. RILEY: "Documenting Georgia in Transition: The Films of Salome Jashi and Nino Kirtadze"Chapter 11: LIDIA MERAS: "Profession: Documentarist. Underground Documentary Making in Iran"Interview: "Reflecting Through Images": The Documentaries of Mercedes Alvarez by Linda Ehrlich

    • Film theory & criticism
      March 2017

      Eclipsed Cinema

      The Film Culture of Colonial Korea

      by Dong Hoon Kim

      In this ground-breaking investigation into the seldom-studied film culture of colonial Korea (1910-1945), Dong Hoon Kim brings new perspectives to the associations between colonialism, modernity, film historiography and national cinema. By reconstructing the lost intricacies of colonial film history, Eclipsed Cinema explores under-investigated aspects of colonial film culture, such as the representational politics of colonial cinema, the film unit of the colonial government, the social reception of Hollywood cinema, and Japanese settlers’ film culture. Filling a significant void in Asian film history, Eclipsed Cinema greatly expands the critical and historical scopes of early cinema and Korean and Japanese film histories, as well as modern Asian culture, and colonial and postcolonial studies. ; In this ground-breaking investigation into the seldom-studied film culture of colonial Korea (1910-1945), Dong Hoon Kim brings new perspectives to the associations between colonialism, modernity, film historiography and national cinema. ; List Of Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Introducing Joseon Cinema: The Question of Film History and the Film Culture Of Colonial Korea; Chapter 1: The Beginning: Toward a Mass Entertainment; Chapter 2: Joseon Cinema, Cinematic Joseon: On Some Critical Questions of Joseon Cinema; Chapter 3: Migrating With the Movies: Japanese Settler Film Culture; Chapter 4; Colonial Film Spectatorship: Nationalist Enough?; Chapter 5: Film Spectatorship and The Tensions Of Modernity; Conclusion: Integrating into the Imperial Cinema; Appendix; Bibliography ; List of Illustrations Acknowledgements INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCING JOSEON CINEMA: THE QUESTION OF FILM HISTORY AND THE FILM CULTURE OF COLONIAL KOREA CHAPTER 1 THE BEGINNING: TOWARD A MASS ENTERTAINMENT Film Culture Begins: The Development of Early Film Culture Film Production Begins: Moving Picture Unit of the Office of the Governor-General CHAPTER 2JOSEON CINEMA, CINEMATIC JOSEON: ON SOME CRITICAL QUESTIONS OF JOSEON CINEMA Desperately Seeking the Joseon Image: Arirang (1926) and the Making of Joseon Film Aesthetics Joseon Film Lyricism: Joseon Colour and Joseon Films ‘Exported’ to Japan CHAPTER 3MIGRATING WITH THE MOVIES: JAPANESE SETTLER FILM CULTURE The Formation and Characteristics of Settler Film Culture ‘A Film Practice Distinctly Joseon’: The Ethnic Segregation of Movie Theatres CHAPTER 4COLONIAL FILM SPECTATORSHIP: NATIONALIST ENOUGH? Korean Spectators or How They Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Hollywood Performing Colonial Identity: The Transcolonial Practice of Byeonsa/Benshi CHAPTER 5FILM SPECTATORSHIP AND THE TENSIONS OF MODERNITYModern Girls and Boys Go to the Movies: Cinema, Modernity, and the Colonised Nation Mobility, Movie Theatres, and Female Film Spectatorship CONCLUSION INTEGRATING INTO THE IMPERIAL CINEMA Appendix Bibliography

    • Film theory & criticism
      March 2018

      Raymond Bellour

      Cinema and the Moving Image

      by Hilary Radner, Alistair Fox

      One of the most influential figures in French film philosophy, Raymond Bellour’s interests range across cinema, art, literature and philosophy, and his work sits at the critical juncture between the cinematic experience in the period of classical cinema to the new forms of spectatorship ushered in by digital media in the 21st century. With a succinct account of Bellour’s oeuvre, this book provides a generous introduction to his ideas on cinema, an annotated bibliography of his work, and a six-chapter translation of a substantial and wide-ranging interview previously unavailable in English. Providing a clear, systematic account of the evolution of Bellour’s thought on the nature of cinematic representation, the impact of digital technology and the response of the spectator, this is an essential guide to the work of a major contemporary thinker. ; Providing a clear, systematic account of the evolution of Bellour’s thought on the nature of cinematic representation, the impact of digital technology and the response of the spectator, this is an essential guide to the work of a major contemporary thinker. ; Acknowledgments; Preface; Introduction: Cinema and Its Discontents: The Place of Raymond Bellour in Film Theory from the Twentieth to the Twenty-first Century, Hilary Radner; PART ONE: Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image, Hilary Radner; Chapter One: Film Analysis: Image and Movement; Chapter Two: The Digital Challenge: From the Theatre to the Gallery; Chapter Three. Cinema and the Body: The Ghost in the Theater; Chapter Four. An Elegy for Cinema; PART TWO: Bellour by Bellour: Selections from an Interview with Raymond Bellour, Conducted by Gabriel Bortzmeyer and Alice LeRoy in December 2015, translated and edited by Alistair Fox; Chapter Five: Formative Influences; Chapter Six: Film Analysis and the Symbolic; Chapter Seven: Thierry Kuntzel and the Rise of Video Art; Chapter Eight: Arrested Images and “the Between-Images”; Chapter Nine: Spectators, Dispositifs, and the Cinematic Body; Chapter Ten: Hypnosis, Emotions, and Animality; PART THREE: Biography and Publications of Raymond Bellour, Alistair Fox; Raymond Bellour: A Biographical Sketch; A Select Annotated Bibliography of the Publications of Raymond Bellour; Select List of Sources Cited; Index ; AcknowledgmentsPrefaceIntroduction: Cinema and Its Discontents: The Place of Raymond Bellour in Film Theory from the Twentieth to the Twenty-first Century, by Hilary Radner PART ONE: Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image, by Hilary Radner Chapter One. Film Analysis: Image and MovementChapter Two. The Digital Challenge: From the Theatre to the GalleryChapter Three. Cinema and the Body: The Ghost in the TheaterChapter Four. An Elegy for Cinema PART TWO: Bellour by Bellour: Selections from an Interview with Raymond Bellour. Conducted by Gabriel Bortzmeyer and Alice LeRoy in December 2015. Translated and Edited by Alistair Fox Chapter Five. Formative InfluencesChapter Six. Film Analysis and the SymbolicChapter Seven. Thierry Kuntzel and the Rise of Video ArtChapter Eight. Arrested Images and "the Between-Images"Chapter Nine. Spectators, Dispositifs, and the Cinematic Body Chapter Ten. Hypnosis, Emotions, and Animality PART THREE: Biography and Publications of Raymond Bellour, by Alistair Fox Raymond Bellour: A Biographical SketchA Select Annotated Bibliography of the Publications of Raymond Bellour Select List of Sources CitedIndex

    • Film theory & criticism
      January 2018

      The Birth of the American Horror Film

      by Gary D. Rhodes

      Although early cinema has long been a key area of research in film studies, the origin and development of the horror film has been a neglected subject for what is arguably one of the world’s most popular film genres. Using thousands of primary sources and long-unseen illustrations, The Birth of the American Horror Film examines a history that begins in colonial Salem, taking an interdisciplinary approach to explore the influence of horror-themed literature, theatre and visual culture in America, and how that context established an amorphous structural foundation for films produced between 1895 and 1915. Exhaustively researched, bridging scholarship on Horror Studies and Early Cinema, The Birth of the American Horror Film is the first major study dedicated to this vital but often overlooked subject. ; The Birth of the American Horror Film examines a history that begins in colonial Salem, taking an interdisciplinary approach to explore the influence of horror-themed literature, theatre and visual culture in America, and how that context established an amorphous structural foundation for films produced between 1895 and 1915. ; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1: Literature; Chapter 2: Theatre; Chapter 3: Visual Culture; Chapter 4: Moving Pictures; Chapter 5: Devils; Chapter 6: Witches; Chapter 7: Ghosts; Chapter 8: Supernatural Creatures; Chapter 9: Death, Murder, and Execution; Chapter 10: Evolution and Devolution; Chapter 11: The Other(s); Chapter 12: The Powers of the Mind; Chapter 13: Mad Scientists; Chapter 14: American Literature Onscreen; Chapter 15: Exhibition and Reception ; Acknowledgements Introduction Chapter 1: Literature Chapter 2: Theatre Chapter 3: Visual Culture Chapter 4: Moving Pictures Chapter 5: Devils Chapter 6: Witches Chapter 7: Ghosts Chapter 8: Supernatural Creatures Chapter 9: Death, Murder, and Execution Chapter 10: Evolution and Devolution Chapter 11: The Other(s) Chapter 12: The Powers of the Mind Chapter 13: Mad Scientists Chapter 14: American Literature Onscreen Chapter 15: Exhibition and Reception

    • The Arts
      August 2019

      Cinematic Nihilism

      Encounters, Confrontations, Overcomings

      by John Marmysz

      Exposing and illustrating how an ongoing engagement with nihilistic alienation may contribute to, rather than detract from, the value of life, Cinematic Nihilism both challenges and builds upon past scholarship that has scrutinised nihilism in the media, but which has generally over-emphasised its negative and destructive aspects. Through case studies of popular films, including Prometheus, The Dark Knight Rises, Dawn of the Dead and The Human Centipede, and with chapters on Scotland’s cinematic portrayal as both a site of ‘nihilistic sacrifice’ and as ‘nowhere in particular’, this book presents a necessary corrective, re-emphasising the constructive potential of cinematic nihilism and casting it as a phenomenon that need not be overcome.

    • The Arts
      July 2019

      ReFocus: The Films of Elaine May

      by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, Dean Brandum

      Spanning from obscurity to notoriety, the films of director, screenwriter, actor and comic Elaine May have recently experienced a long-overdue renaissance. Although she made only four films — A New Leaf (1971), The Heartbreak Kid (1972), Mikey and Nicky (1976) and Ishtar (1987) — and never reached the level of acclaim of her frequent collaborator Mike Nichols, May’s work is as enigmatic, sophisticated and unceasingly fascinating as her own complicated, reluctant star persona. This collection focuses both on the films she has directed, and also emphasises her work with other high profile collaborators such as John Cassavetes, Warren Beatty and Otto Preminger.

    • The Arts
      June 2019

      Animal Worlds

      Film, Philosophy and Time

      by Laura McMahon

      Focusing on a recent wave of international art cinema, Animal Worlds offers the first sustained analysis of the relations between cinematic time and animal life. Through an aesthetic of extended duration, films such as Bestiaire (2010), The Turin Horse (2011) and A Cow’s Life (2012) attend to animal worlds of sentience and perception, while registering the governing of life through biopolitical regimes. Bringing together Gilles Deleuze’s writings on cinema and on animals – while drawing on Jacques Derrida, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Nicole Shukin and others – the book argues that these films question the biopolitical reduction of animal life to forms of capital, opening up realms of virtuality, becoming and alternative political futures.

    • The Arts
      August 2018

      Sounding Modernism

      Rhythm and Sonic Mediation in Modern Literature and Film

      by Julian Murphet, Helen Groth, Penelope Hone

      Explores the transformations of sound in modern literary and cinematic forms from the 1890s to the mid-20th century This volume brings together a range of essays by eminent and emergent scholars working at the intersection of modern literary, cinema and sound studies. The individual studies ask what specific sonorous qualities are capable of being registered by different modern media, and how sonic transpositions and transferences across media affect the ways in which human subjects attend to modern soundscapes. Script, groove, electrical current, magnetic imprint, phonographic vibration: as the contributors show, sound traverses these and other material platforms to become an insistent ground-note of modern aesthetics, one not yet adequately integrated into critical accounts of the period. This collection also provides a commanding and wide-ranging investigation of the conditions under which modernists tapped technically into the rhythms, echoes and sonic architectures of their worlds. Key Features Addresses a growing demand for critical studies on the interface between literary history and the ‘soundscape’ of modernity Discusses the rich nexus of new sound recording technologies, new vocabularies of and for sonic phenomena, new standardisations of rhythm and speed, and the weird displacements of ‘voice’ peculiar to modernity Answers the need for an explicit engagement with the symbolic registrations of sonic modernity on textual forms in sound studies Systematically analyses modernist forms in terms of their capacities to mediate rhythms, sonic textures and vocal derangements

    • The Arts
      May 2019

      Law and New Media

      West of Everything

      by Christian Delage, Peter Goodrich, Marco Wan

      Will social media lead to social law? The force of legal remediation? Virtual courts and online judges? Paperless trials? Electronic discovery? All of these novel legal developments impact how we conceive of the practice of law. Here, international specialists from new and established domains of law, media, film and virtual studies address the emergence of the jurist in the era of digital transmission. From the cinema of the early 20th century to social media, this volume explores the multiple intersections of these visual technologies and the law from the theoretical insight they generate to the nature of law to the impact they have on doctrinal development.

    • The Arts
      November 2019

      Irish Queer Cinema

      by Allison Macleod

      In recent years queer identities have become increasingly visible in Irish cinema, a shift that can be linked to political, economic and social changes taking place both in Ireland and around the world, as well as to changes in national film policy to cater more to international audiences. Irish Queer Cinema explores the sexual politics and socio-economic conditions that have determined the shape and evolution of these representations whilst interrogating the relationship between on-screen visibility and progressive sexual politics. Drawing together 23 films as depictive of an Irish queer cinema, including Clash of the Ash, The Crying Game and Me First, the book investigates the different ways gender and sexuality intersect with nationhood and national forms of belonging, and explores the role of queerness within the constitution of an Irish national culture.

    • The Arts
      May 2018

      Ancient Greece on British Television

      by Fiona Hobden, Amanda Wrigley

      Ancient Greece has inspired television producers and captivated viewing audiences in the United Kingdom for over half a century. By examining how and why political, social and cultural narratives of Greece have been constructed through television’s distinctive audiovisual languages, and in relation also to its influential sister-medium radio, this volume explores the nature and function of these public engagements with the written and material remains of the Hellenic past. Through 10 case studies drawn from feature programmes, educational broadcasts, children’s animation, theatre play productions, dramatic fiction and documentaries broadcast across the decades, this collection offers wide-ranging insights into the significance of ancient Greece on British television. Key features and benefits First multi-authored collection of essays on the topic of ancient Greece on television Brings experts from the disciplines of Classics and Media Studies together to offer rigorous examples of how to apply the methodologies of Media Studies to Classical Reception Explores the representation of Ancient Greece across a range of forms, including documentary, television drama, radio, theatre plays, educational television and children’s animation Examines the use of mass media forms in formal and informal teaching and learning contexts, and evaluates the role of the academic in broadcasting Investigates institutional production contexts, developing technologies, the use of space and location, style and aesthetics, costume and staging, globalization and localization and audiences Includes an interview with ancient historian Michael Scott and producer-director David Wilson to reflecting particularly on concept to reality Discusses content broadcast on the BBC, ITV and Channel 4 Contributors include Anna Foka, Lynn Fotheringham, Peter Golphin, Tony Keen, Sarah Miles, Amanda Potter and John Wyver

    • The Arts
      May 2018

      Irish Queer Cinema

      by Allison Macleod

      In recent years queer identities have become increasingly visible in Irish cinema, a shift that can be linked to political, economic and social changes taking place both in Ireland and around the world, as well as to changes in national film policy to cater more to international audiences. Irish Queer Cinema explores the sexual politics and socio-economic conditions that have determined the shape and evolution of these representations whilst interrogating the relationship between on-screen visibility and progressive sexual politics. Drawing together 23 films as depictive of an Irish queer cinema, including Clash of the Ash, The Crying Game and Me First, the book investigates the different ways gender and sexuality intersect with nationhood and national forms of belonging, and explores the role of queerness within the constitution of an Irish national culture.

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