• The Arts
      October 2018

      Reading Room

      Re-Lektüren des Innenraums

      by Christine Göttler, Peter J. Schneemann, Birgitt Borkopp-Restle, Norberto Gramaccini, Peter W. Marx, Bernd Nicolai

      Reading Room erprobt Entwürfe, Theorien und Lektüren des Innenraums von der Frühen Neuzeit bis in die Gegenwart. Ausgangspunkt ist ein dynamisches und relationales Raumkonzept, das die Vielfalt historischer Medien, Kontexte und Diskurse berücksichtigt. Die Beiträge untersuchen die Erzeugung und Umformung von Innenräumen durch soziale Praktiken und visuelle und materielle Strategien. Sie bieten exemplarische Lektüren heterotopischer, dystopischer und utopischer Raumsituationen in Kunst, Architektur und Theater im Spannungsfeld von Innen und Außen, Realität und Repräsentation. Das Buch entwickelt Fragestellungen weiter, die gegenwärtig in der Kunst- und Architekturgeschichte und der Theaterwissenschaft verhandelt werden.

    • The Arts
      September 2016

      Schillernde Unschärfe

      Der Begriff der Authentizität im architektonischen Erbe

      by Tino Mager

      Historische Bauwerke erlauben uns Einsichten in das Wesen an sich bereits verflüchtigter, auf andere Weise nicht mehr erfahrbarer Zeitabschnitte. Doch wie ‚authentisch‘ sind diese Relikte und was meint diese Frage eigentlich? Anhand der Betrachtung dieses hochaktuellen Begriffs – Authentizität – zeigt das Buch auf, wie stark sich die Werke der Vergangenheit und damit auch unsere Erkenntnisse über sie verändern und wie unstet unsere Sprache ist, mit der wir uns darüber verständigen. Schillernde Unschärfe verknüpft spannende philosophische Gedanken mit konkreten Beobachtungen und entwirft einen neuen Blick auf unser Verständnis von Vergangenheit. Detaillierte Fallstudien revidieren gängige Vorstellungen bezüglich der Wahrheit und Echtheit unseres kulturellen Erbes.

    • Architecture
      March 2008

      Wittgenstein's House

      Language, Space, and Architecture

      by Nana Last

    • History of architecture

      Illustrated Notes on Western Architecture by Liang Sicheng

      by Sicheng Liang (author), Zhu Lin (editor)

      A collection of Liang Sicheng’s manuscripts of class notes and assignments on the history of Western architecture lectured by Alfred H. Gumaer at the University of Pennsylvania in 1924 Keeping the original size of Liang’s notebooks, with over 120 Liang’s magnificent sketches as the major content and on-class notes as appendices

    • History of architecture

      Chinese Architecture: Art and Artifacts

      by Sicheng Liang (author), Zhu Lin (editor)

      Selecting eight English articles on Chinese architecture by the Chinese architect Liang Sicheng, along with about 100 valuable architectural drawings and photographs An English-language scholarly account of the most erudite studies on Chinese architectural history, covering art and architecture, Buddhist cave sculpture, the Chinese oldest wooden structure, early pagodas, etc.

    • History of architecture

      Chinese Architecture: Art and Artifacts

      by Sicheng Liang (author), Zhu Lin (editor)

      Selecting eight English articles on Chinese architecture by the Chinese architect Liang Sicheng, along with about 100 valuable architectural drawings and photographs An English-language scholarly account of the most erudite studies on Chinese architectural history, covering art and architecture, Buddhist cave sculpture, the Chinese oldest wooden structure, early pagodas, etc.

    • Museums & museology

      A Paradise Lost —The Imperial Garden Yuanming Yuan

      by Wang Rong Zu

      For foreign readers and researchers interested in Chinese garden architecture, the rise and fall of Yuanming Yuan and the history of the Qing dynasty First comprehensive study of the palatial garden complex in a Western language, amply illustrated with photographs and original drawings Written in an engaging style, Young-tsu Wong brings “the garden of perfect brightness” to life as he leads readers on a grand tour of its architecture and history

    • History of architecture
      September 2011

      100 Ideas that Changed Architecture

      by Richard Weston

      This inspiring book chronicles the most influential ideas that have shaped architecture. Entertainingly written by an expert on architecture, it provides a concise history of the subject, and offers a fascinating resource to dip into for the general reader. Starting with the basic building 'components' of door, window, column and beam and the Classical orders, it then goes on to explore historical movements such as the Picturesque and Beaux-Arts, innovative materials such as steel and reinforced concrete, technical innovations, such as the lift and electric lighting, through to modern movements such as Universal Design and Deconstruction. Arranged in a broadly chronological order, the ideas are presented through fascinating text and arresting visuals, 100 Ideas that Changed Architecture explores when each idea first evolved and the subsequent impact it has had up to the present day.

    • The Arts
      November 2003

      Designs on modernity

      Exhibiting the city in 1920s Paris

      by Tag Gronberg

      Presents the 1925 Paris Exhibition as a key moment in attempts to update the image of Paris as "capital of the 19th century". At the Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes, Paris itself, as much as the commodity, was put on show. This text focuses on the Exhibition as a set of contesting representations of the modern city, stressing the importance of consumption and display for concepts of urban modernity. Here Le Corbusier's "Pavillon de L'Esprit Nouveau" with its "Plan Voisin" for the redesign of Paris confronted another equally up-to-date city - Paris "a woman's city", world centre of fashion and shopping. Taking as her starting point one of the most dramatic 1925 exhibits, the Rue des Boutiques which spanned the river Seine, the author analyzes the contemporary significance of the small Parisian luxury shop. She demonstrates how boutiques, conceived both as urbanism and as advertising, redefined Paris as the modern city. ;

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man

      by Tijana Vujosevic

      The creation of Soviet culture in the 1920s and the 1930s was the most radical of modernist projects, both in aesthetic and in political terms. Modernism and the Making of the New Man explores the architecture of this period as the nexus between aesthetics and politics. The design of the material environment, according to the author, was the social effort that most clearly articulated the dynamic of the socialist project as a negotiation between utopia and reality, the will for progress and the will for tyranny. It was a comprehensive effort that brought together professional architects and statisticians, theatre directors, managers, housewives, pilots, construction workers. What they had in common was the enthusiasm for defining the "new man", the ideal citizen of the radiant future, and the settings in which he or she lives.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man

      by Tijana Vujosevic

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man

      by Tijana Vujosevic

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Ideal homes, 1918–39

      Domestic design and suburban Modernism

      by Deborah Sugg Ryan, Christopher Breward, Bill Sherman

      This book focuses on the housebuilding boom of the interwar years, when Britain became a nation of homeowners. It investigates the ways in which ordinary people expressed new class and gender identities through the design, architecture and decoration of interwar homes then and now. It argues that these 'ideal' homes combine nostalgia for the past and longing for the future resulting in a new specifically suburban modernism.

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Ideal homes, 1918–39

      Domestic design and suburban Modernism

      by Deborah Sugg Ryan, Christopher Breward, Bill Sherman

      This book explores the aspirations and tastes of new suburban communities in interwar England for domestic architecture and design that was both modern and nostalgic. It investigates the ways in which new suburban class and gender identities were forged in the architecture, design and decoration of the home, through choices such as ebony elephants placed on mantelpieces and modern Easiwork dressers in kitchens. Ultimately, it argues that a specifically suburban modernism emerged, which looked to both past and future for inspiration. Thus the interwar 'ideal' home was both a retreat from the outside world and a site of change and experimentation. The book also examines how the interwar home is lived in today.

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Ideal homes, 1918–39

      Domestic design and suburban Modernism

      by Deborah Sugg Ryan, Christopher Breward, Bill Sherman

      This book explores the aspirations and tastes of new suburban communities in interwar England for domestic architecture and design that was both modern and nostalgic. It investigates the ways in which new suburban class and gender identities were forged in the architecture, design and decoration of the home, through choices such as ebony elephants placed on mantelpieces and modern Easiwork dressers in kitchens. Ultimately, it argues that a specifically suburban modernism emerged, which looked to both past and future for inspiration. Thus the interwar 'ideal' home was both a retreat from the outside world and a site of change and experimentation. The book also examines how the interwar home is lived in today. It will appeal to academics and students in design and social and cultural history, as well as a wider readership curious about interwar homes.

    • The Arts
      February 2018

      Ideal homes, 1918–39

      Domestic design and suburban Modernism

      by Deborah Sugg Ryan, Christopher Breward, Bill Sherman

      This book explores the aspirations and tastes of new suburban communities in interwar England for domestic architecture and design that was both modern and nostalgic. It investigates the ways in which new suburban class and gender identities were forged in the architecture, design and decoration of the home, through choices such as ebony elephants placed on mantelpieces and modern Easiwork dressers in kitchens. Ultimately, it argues that a specifically suburban modernism emerged, which looked to both past and future for inspiration. Thus the interwar 'ideal' home was both a retreat from the outside world and a site of change and experimentation. The book also examines how the interwar home is lived in today. It will appeal to academics and students in design and social and cultural history, as well as a wider readership curious about interwar homes.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      Reconstructing modernity

      Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

      by James Greenhalgh

      Reconstructing modernity assesses the character of approaches to rebuilding British cities during the decades after the Second World War. It explores the strategies of spatial governance that sought to restructure society and looks at the cast of characters who shaped these processes. It challenges traditional views of urban modernism and sheds new light on the importance of the immediate post-war for the trajectory of planned urban renewal in twentieth century. It examines plans and policies designed to produce and govern lived spaces- shopping centers, housing estates, parks, schools and homes - and shows how and why they succeeded or failed. It demonstrates how the material space of the city and how people used and experienced it was crucial in understanding historical change in urban contexts. The book is aimed at those interested in urban modernism, the use of space in town planning, the urban histories of post-war Britain and of social housing.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      Reconstructing modernity

      Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

      by James Greenhalgh

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      January 2018

      Reconstructing modernity

      Space, power and governance in mid-twentieth century British cities

      by James Greenhalgh

    • The Arts
      November 2018

      Museum – Exhibition – Cultural Heritage / Museum – Ausstellung – Kulturelles Erbe

      Changing Perspectives from China to Europe / Blickwechsel zwischen China und Europa

      by Eva-Maria Seng

      From the 18th century onwards, the museum as an institution has seen an upsurge which especially in Europe and in China has led to new creations and to the redesigning of established facilities in recent years. Simultaneously, the scholarly reflection on exhibitions has become an academic discipline in its own right. The term and the phenomenon of cultural heritage, being a seemingly counter-directed movement between local, regional and national reference points on the one hand and global sites representing the entire heritage of humankind on the other, compose the background music to a recent cultural evolution labelled glocalization. The essays shed light on the complex developments by taking different perspectives and elaborating the present situation by means of contemporary examples.

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