• Castles & fortifications

      Castles of South Wales

      by Chris S. Stephens

    • Local history

      Tales and Traditions of Scottish Castles

      by Nigel G. Tranter

      Nigel Tranter's gift for bringing Scottish history to life is demonstrated in this lively book which details 45 of the nation's castles with associated tales and traditions. With a broad geographical spread, Tranter breathes life into many of Scotland's gaunt and shadowy ruins with a lively mix of anecdote, fact, myth and legend. An essential holiday companion when visiting Scotland.

    • Castles & fortifications

      A Company of Forts

      A Guide to the Medieval Castles of West Wales

      by Paul R. Davis

    • History of engineering & technology
      February 2016

      From Colonies to Countries in the North Caribbean

      Military Engineers in the Development of Cities and Territories

      by Editor(s): Pedro Luengo-Gutiérrez, Gene Allen Smith

      This volume brings together eight essays that address the result of a research project involving a group of international scholars. It explores a little-discussed, yet interesting phenomenon in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico region – how military engineers reshaped the physical landscape for imperial reasons and, in doing so, laid the foundations for broader colonial development. Moreover, this transnational scenario reveals how military construction reached beyond cross-borders themes and histories from the age of imperialism. As such, this book provides valuable insights into the role of military engineers in the process of articulating new American countries from the late 18th to 19th century. While this time period is full of international and local conflicts, it remains essential for understanding the region’s history – from the Gulf of Mexico to the Caribbean Sea – and even its current situation. Due to independence movements and Spain’s Decree of Free Trade (1778), the region’s connection with Europe changed dramatically. This affected the entire American continent, but had a particularly peculiar in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. For this reason, this volume underlines the key role of military engineers on other fields, from railroad design to environmental intervention, through cartographical works, and in diplomacy, all the while overcoming the traditional perspective of military engineers as being only builders of structures for war.

    • History of engineering & technology
      February 2016

      From Colonies to Countries in the North Caribbean

      Military Engineers in the Development of Cities and Territories

      by Editor(s): Pedro Luengo-Gutiérrez, Gene Allen Smith

      This volume brings together eight essays that address the result of a research project involving a group of international scholars. It explores a little-discussed, yet interesting phenomenon in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico region – how military engineers reshaped the physical landscape for imperial reasons and, in doing so, laid the foundations for broader colonial development. Moreover, this transnational scenario reveals how military construction reached beyond cross-borders themes and histories from the age of imperialism. As such, this book provides valuable insights into the role of military engineers in the process of articulating new American countries from the late 18th to 19th century. While this time period is full of international and local conflicts, it remains essential for understanding the region’s history – from the Gulf of Mexico to the Caribbean Sea – and even its current situation. Due to independence movements and Spain’s Decree of Free Trade (1778), the region’s connection with Europe changed dramatically. This affected the entire American continent, but had a particularly peculiar in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. For this reason, this volume underlines the key role of military engineers on other fields, from railroad design to environmental intervention, through cartographical works, and in diplomacy, all the while overcoming the traditional perspective of military engineers as being only builders of structures for war.

    • Architecture

      CASTLES, PALACES & STATELY HOUSES OF BRITAIN & IRELAND

      Britain's magnificent architectural, cultural and historical heritage is celebrated, with 120 entries and 500 fine art paintings and photographs

      by Charles Phillips; Professor Richard G.Wilson FRHistS

      This sumptuously illustrated history is an authoritative guide to the castles, royal residences and historic houses of Britain and Northern Ireland. It combines an in-depth account of the most important buildings with a wealth of stories and information about Britain s glorious architectural past and heritage, including Burghley House, Longleat,Windsor Castle and Balmoral. Special features focus on important art and architectural movements and on the great architects including Wren, Adam,Wyatt and Lutyens. More than 500 photographs and specially commissioned maps, plans and drawings bring these national treasures vividly to life. A truly impressive reference to the historic buildings of the United Kingdom the castles, royal palaces, stately homes, fortified manors and the great country houses. An A-Z gazetteer with contact details plus over 50 maps help you explore Britain s architectural legacy. CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE BOOK IN DIGITAL FORM

    • The Arts
      May 2019

      Ruins and Follies of East Anglia

      by Edward Couzens-Lake

      This book takes an affectionate journey around some of the atmospheric and occasionally mysterious ruins and follies that can be found in East Anglia. It might be a building that has a particular historical, cultural or other significant interest but which is, at the time of writing, in such a state of disrepair that its restoration is either impractical or unlikely – or, in the cases of particularly old buildings, for example castles, not a consideration for obvious reasons. Or it might be a folly, a building that is still wholly complete and standing but was solely constructed for ornamental purposes and often for no practical use other than for the planners involved to ‘prove’ that it could be done. With a design that is often deliberately eye-catching, eccentric or even controversial in appearance, Edward Couzens-Lake investigates the reasons for this quirk, looking at, for example, the Victorian ‘fashion’ for making buildings that had a utilitarian purpose, such as workhouses or water towers, as ornamental in design as possible. Featuring forty-five such sites that fit into those descriptions, together with an accompanying set of photographs, each ruin or folly selected will include a concise and informative narrative relating to the reasons for its construction, its history and, where relevant, its present day function. Edward Couzens-Lake also looks at the future of some of the ruins and follies featured – do they have a future? Are they under threat? Might they eventually be lost to the landscape altogether, or do they have a function to play in the modern world? This charming and fascinating book looks to answer some of these questions.

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