• The Arts
      October 2016

      Outcome

      LGBT Portraits

      by Tom Dingley

      In 2014 Photographer Tom Dingley set up his #Outcome project - to photograph LGBT people with the attributes of their everyday life - their work, or their interests; and holding apicture of themselves as a child. The message was, no matter how hard it is growing up, no matter who you were, you become who you become, and you are amazing. Several well known people are included. Two years and several exhibitions later, this is the Outcome. 80 photographs with short biographical statements from the subjects. Royal format, High quality paper.

    • Art treatments & subjects

      Notes for Friends

      by Robert Adams

      World renowned photographer Robert Adams explores the possibility of discovering beauty in the compromised landscape of the new American West. His photographs, rendering the landscape in rich black-and-white images, clearly demonstrate that beauty can be found, suggesting a new kind of exploration that could yield a transforming discovery -- the basis for a love of home. Pictures in the book reacquaint us with places that may have been lost to habit or prejudice. Robert Adams encourages us to walk minor roads that at first appear inconsequential, but that in fact lead to wonder. Light rains its miracle on fields next to suburban development, across the slopes of nameless foothills, and onto trees next to motorways.

    • Photographs: collections
      September 2018

      Dylan by Schatzberg

      by Jerry Schatzberg

      In 1965, photographer Jerry Schatzberg, already well-established in the field due to his fashion and portrait photography for various publications, such as Vogue, Esquire and Life, listened to Bob Dylan for the first time. He had been hearing about the singer for close to three years; two friends were especially dogged and would ask him every time they spoke if he had heard the music yet. Finally, feeling obligated to them for their persistency, he listened and understood immediately why Dylan was inspiring such passionate excitement. Shortly thereafter, Schatzberg was photographing a job in his studio and had some fortuitous company. Famed music journalist Al Aronowitz and disc jockey Scott Ross were discussing Dylan and a recent performance they had seen of his. Half listening to their conversation, he volunteered that he'd like to photograph the singer if given the chance. Dylan's new wife (one of the friends mentioned above) called the following day and gave him an open invitation to the studio where he was currently recording 'Highway 61 Revisited'. Excited and curious, Schatzberg set off the very next day for the studio, exactly six days after the seminal Newport Folk Festival set where Dylan went electric and was collectively booed. Schatzberg received a warm welcome from the singer, who immediately sat him down to listen to what he had been recording that day. Dylan gave him free rein of the studio once he started shooting and the images that emerged from that day make obvious the comfortable and relaxed atmosphere that was already brewing between photographer and subject. Considering Dylan's almost-universal dislike of journalists (and by extension photographers), this was a completely unprecedented situation, one that Schatzberg took seriously. That almost-instant trust and rapport quickly grew into a friendship and they are part of the reason Schatzberg's sittings with Dylan work so successfully and are so important. Dylan is relaxed, he's funny, he takes the props that the photographer gives him and has fun with them - he's obviously not taking himself too seriously. Working and socialising together, Schatzberg would eventually do nine more photo shoots with Dylan from 1965-6, arguably the singer's most creative period, and capture the (now) Nobel laureate during one of the most pivotal moments in music history. Part of their uniqueness is their basic broad range of intimate and public locations: music and photography studios, live performances and street portraits. But more than that, each session (including the one for possibly his greatest album, 'Blonde on Blonde') says something different about Dylan, the man and the musician, and manages to perfectly capture the many facets of one of the most unique, complex and mysterious individuals of all time.

    • Individual photographers
      October 2018

      The Beatles

      London, 1963. Norman Parkinson

      by Norman Parkinson. Introduction by Pat Gilbert

      On the morning of Thursday, September 12, 1963, noted fashion photographer Norman Parkinson was to photograph a young pop group from Liverpool. Earlier that year, the band had exploded onto the scene - releasing the first of eleven (out of twelve) studio albums that would reach number one on the charts. That band was The Beatles. The album had been 'Please Please Me', it was still number one and it would stay at number one for thirty weeks. Parkinson, already established as Britain's most famous photographer, had a date with its new greatest band. Revealing, insightful and funny this collection of photos captures The Beatles near the start of their spectacular career. Their creativity is plain to see in these photos which have become some of the most important in the extensive Beatles catalogue. Now, ACC Editions, in collaboration with The Norman Parkinson Archive and Iconic Images, presents this historic meeting between a new music group and one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. Covering nearly 30 rolls of film, these images of The Beatles at the President Hotel in Bloomsbury and famed Abbey Road Studios, offer a rare insight of the making of an iconic band.

    • The Arts
      February 2019

      Terry O'Neill

      by Terry O'Neill, Introduction by Dylan Jones

      The ultimate record of the work of a world-class photographer. Capturing the iconic, candid, and unguarded moments of the famous and the notorious. "Terry was everywhere in the 60s - he knew everything and everyone that was happening" Keith Richards "Terry O'Neill rates rightly as one of the best photographers in the world. He captures something special" Sir Michael Caine "When it comes to photographic legends there can be few more prolific or revered than Terry O'Neill, the man who shot the greats." VOGUE "This sumptuous collection of portraits, taken over six decades, represents the best of his memorable career and should grace every coffee table in the land" The Daily Mail "I've been repeatedly asked to write my autobiography - I have seen an awful lot of famous people at their best and worst - but I'm not interested in making money trading their secrets or mine. I want my pictures to tell a story not sell a story." Terry O'Neill Terry O'Neill is one of the world's most celebrated and collected photographers. No one has captured the frontline of fame so broadly - and for so long. For more than 50 years, he has photographed rock stars and presidents, royals and movie stars, at work, at play, in private. He pioneered backstage reportage photography with the likes of Frank Sinatra, David Bowie, Sir Elton John and Chuck Berry and his work comprises a vital chronicle of rock and roll history. Now, for the first time, an exhaustive cataloguing of his archive conducted over the last three years has revisited more than 2 million negatives and has unearthed unseen images that escaped the eye over a career spanning 53 years. Similarly, his use of 35mm cameras on film sets and the early pop music shows of the 60s opened up a new visual art form using photojournalism, to revolutionise formal portraiture. His work captured the iconic, candid, and unguarded moments of the famous and the notorious - from Ava Gardner to Amy Winehouse, from Churchill to Nelson Mandela, from the earliest photographs of young emerging bands such as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones to her Majesty the Queen at Buckingham Palace. O' Neill spent more than 30 years photographing Frank Sinatra, amassing a unique archive of more than 3,000 Sinatra negatives. Add to that the magazine covers, album sleeves, film poster and fashion shoots of 1,000 stars, and Terry O'Neill - comprises the most compelling and epic catalogue of the age of celebrity.

    • Photography & photographs
      July 2019

      Norman Parkinson

      Always in Fashion

      by Edited by Carrie Kania and Alex Anthony

      One of the greatest photographers of the twentieth century. A collection of Norman Parkinson's greatest works, in the fields of fashion, celebrity, royalty and portraiture. Featuring many iconic images of famous faces including Audrey Hepburn, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Jean Seberg, Jerry Hall and many more. A long overdue introduction into the work of a genius of photography. Norman Parkinson (1913-1990) is one of the greatest and most influential photographers of the twentieth century. Beginning in the 1930s his style of work helped define the look of each subsequent decade (including the New Look of Paris in the '50s and Swinging London of the '60s) and his impact on his followers was immense. Parkinson gained recognition in his early years revolutionising photography by moving female models from the static, serious and controlled environment of the photographic studio to real-life locations and exotic surroundings. This dynamic and spontaneous style garnered the attention of numerous fashion magazines including Harper's Bazaar, Vogue and Town & Country, earning Parkinson international recognition. His photographs helped create the age of the supermodel and made Parkinson the photographer of choice for fashion designers, artists and writers, musicians and actors, and British royalty. In a career that spanned six decades, Parkinson dazzled the world and inspired his peers with sparkling inventiveness as a portrait and fashion photographer. His achievements were recognised by the Queen of England when, in 1981, he was awarded a C.B.E. (Commander of the British Empire). In that same year he was also honoured with a major retrospective exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

    • The Arts
      January 2016

      Face: shape and angle

      Helen Muspratt, photographer

      by Jessica Sutcliffe

      Born into a civil service family in India in 1907, Helen Muspratt was a lifelong communist, a member of the Cambridge intellectual milieu of the 1930s, and a working mother at a time when such a role was unusual for women of her class. She was also a pioneering photographer, creating an extraordinary body of work in many different styles and genres. In partnership with Lettice Ramsey she made portraits of many notable figures of the 1930s in the fields of science and culture. Her experimental photography, using techniques such as solarisation and multiple exposure, bears comparison with the innovations of Man Ray and Lee Miller. This book reproduces some of Helen Muspratt's most important photographic images, including documentary records of the Soviet Union and the Welsh valleys. The accompanying text by Jessica Sutcliffe is an intimate and revealing memoir of her mother that offers a fascinating insight into her life, work and politics. ;

    • Literature & Literary Studies
      September 2018

      Shakespeare by McBean

      by Adrian Woodhouse

      Shakespeare by McBean collects 300 images, many never before published, taken by the renowned photographer Angus McBean. Incorporating images from every one of Shakespeare's plays performed at the RSC, with some from the Old Vic, between the years 1845-62, it is a veritable who's who of the British stage. Richard Burton, Vivien Leigh, Robert Donat, Alec Guiness, Michael Redgrave, Peggy Ashcroft, Laurence Olivier, Edith Evans, Paul Scofield, Diana Rigg, Anthony Quayle, Charles Laughton, John Gielgud, Peter O'Toole and Dorothy Tutin are just some of the names that appear. Angus McBean was an exceptional talent, whether he was transforming the photography of rehearsals, inspiring the Beatles, or entertaining his admireres with his light-hearted espousal of surrealism in portraiture. In a career lasting half a century his influence can be seen in everything from advertising to pop culture.

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