• Biography: general

      The Life of Henry Moore

      by Roger Berthoud

      Henry Moore's rise from Yorkshire miner's son to international acclaim as the twentieth century's greatest sculptor is one of the most remarkable stories in British art. In this revised, updated, expanded and redesigned new edition of The Life of Henry Moore, Roger Berthoud charts Moore's transition from controversial young modernist to pillar of the art-world establishment, garlanded with domestic and foreign honours. His account is enriched by the weekly interviews he did with Moore -- and his wife Irina -- before the sculptor's death in 1986, aged eighty-eight.;At home and abroad Moore's sculptures aroused strong passions and were often the object of abuse, sharp criticism and even physical assault, as well as of admiration. He was attacked by younger artists, among others, who saw his growing fame as an obstacle to their advancement. He was to survive the ebb and flow in his reputation, and emerge with the status of a contemporary old master.;From a mass of material, including recently discovered early letters, and interviews with Moore's friends, his former assistants and students, dealers, collectors, museum officials and leading architects with whom he worked, Roger Berthoud has built up a lively and engaging though not uncritical picture of Moore's long life and career in this definitive biography.

    • The Arts
      November 2017

      THIS BABY DOLL WILL BE A JUNKIE

      Report of an Art and Research Project on Addiction and Spaces of Violence

      by Ulrike Möntmann, Peter Weibel

      As the portrait of a fringe group, this book invites the reader to engage with the phenomenon of outcasts; it orders the rich material – which has grown out of numerous projects of artistic research with female drug users in European prisons and therapy institutions – and sets it into context. In this way, the conditions which have become structurally embedded in social processes are laid open and made perceptible as a matter of public concern. The biographical and artistic work with the inmates, the correspondence, the interventions in the isolated, public, and cultural sphere, the minutes, reflections, and results of the interdisciplinary exchange with scientists are comprehensively documented and illustrated.

    • The Arts
      December 2016

      Die Gliederpuppe

      Kult – Kunst – Konzept

      by Markus Rath

      Seit Jahrtausenden werden bewegliche Menschenfiguren gefertigt. Die Varianten der Gattung „Gliederpuppe" reichen von einfachen Statuetten über standardisierte Modelle bis hin zu hochkomplexen Preziosen. Die Monographie leistet erstmals eine grundlegende Erforschung beweglicher Skulpturen in Menschengestalt. Sie beschreibt die kulturelle Verankerung der Gliederpuppe im christlichen und profanen Kult seit der Antike, aber auch innerhalb der modernen Kultur und Wissenschaft. Sie verfolgt ihren Einsatz als Modell und Inspirationsquelle in der Künstlerwerkstatt der Neuzeit und analysiert ihren Wandel vom verheimlichten Modell zu einem Symbol der Moderne. Stets erweist sich die Gliederpuppe als ein entscheidendes Mittel und Merkmal menschlichen Gestaltens.

    • The Arts
      April 2017

      GO GO GO OLD GOLD REITER GO

      by Roland Reiter

      The publication provides a comprehensive overview of the work produced by the Austrian sculptor Roland Reiter between 2001 and 2016. Reiter’s approach to his work is largely based on his personal encounters. The artist uses the experiences made on his journey through life by sublimating, or enlarging and dramatizing the events. His art is not a cool abstraction; instead, one of its characteristics is that it captures the emotional, "expressive" moment. It combines materials that do not fit together in a traditional sense but nevertheless supplement each other in terms of contemporary art practice. He uses this dichotomy to create a tension that seems to satisfy a particular kind of voyeurism. One could, paradoxically, make these two statements: "Even though I am intrigued, I turn away", or "I turn towards it even though I feel put off and alienated".

    • Theory of Art
      November 2018

      Abstraction Matters

      Contemporary Sculptors in Their Own Words

      by Editor(s): Cristina Baldacci, Michele Bertolini, Stefano Esengrini, Andrea Pinotti

      From the archaic funerary and sacred stones to the most recent three-dimensional objects, sculpture has been determined by a dualistic tension between the urge for imitation of natural forms (mimesis) and the desire to freely shape autonomous configurations (abstraction). Within such a complex history, the second half of the 20th century has been a particularly intense period. Besides their abstract works, many sculptors developed an extraordinarily rich theoretical discourse. This collection of essays presents some of the most eminent protagonists of this crucial historical moment by focusing on the artists’ “own words”. In their analysis, the contributors have followed three key-notions – “Sensation”, “Idea”, and “Language” – that fruitfully collect different artists under a common conceptual arch and show the aesthetic relevance of abstraction in sculpture. This book addresses high-level undergraduate and graduate students, as well as the scholarly community in the fields of aesthetics and art criticism, art history and art theory, visual, cultural and media studies.

    • The Arts
      March 2018

      The Image of the Feminine in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats and Angelos Sikelianos

      by Author(s): Anastasia Psoni

      Modernism, as a powerful movement, saw the literary and artistic traditions, as well as pure science, starting to evolve radically, creating a crisis, even chaos, in culture and society. Within this chaos, myth offered an ordered picture of that world employing symbolic and poetic images. Both W.B. Yeats and Angelos Sikelianos embraced myth and symbols because they liberate imagination and raise human consciousness, bringing together humans and the cosmos. Being opposed to the rigidity of scientific materialism that inhibits spiritual development, the two poets were waiting for a new age and a new religion, expecting that they, themselves, would inspire their community and usher in the change. In their longing for a new age, archaeology was a magnetic field for Yeats and Sikelianos, as it was for many writers and thinkers. After Sir Arthur Evans’s discovery of the Minoan Civilization where women appeared so peacefully prominent, the dream of re-creating a gynocentric mythology was no longer a fantasy.In Yeats’s and Sikelianos’s gynocentric mythology, the feminine figure appears in various forms and, like in a drama, it plays different roles. Significantly, a gynocentric mythology permeates the work of the two poets and this mythology is of pivotal importance in their poetry, their poetics and even in their life as the intensity of their creative desire brought to them female personalities to inspire and guide them.Indeed, in Yeats’s and Sikelianos’s gynocentric mythology, the image of the feminine holds a place within a historical context taking the reader into a larger social, political and religious space.

    • Museums & museology
      February 2011

      Touching Art

      The Poetics and the Politics of Exhibiting the Tree of Life

      by Author(s): Maria Emília Fonseca

      This study focusses on the exhibition of the Tree of Life, a sculpture made in Mozambique of decommissioned, dismantled weapons, created to celebrate peace and commissioned by the British Museum, chosen to be the symbol of the “Africa 2005” season of cultural events and exhibited in its Great Court between February and October 2005. This artwork was first exhibited in Maputo before being dispatched to Britain and it is presently on display at the Sainsbury African Galleries of the British Museum, in London.This dissertation moves along two converging routes: the articulation of the meaning(s) produced within the exhibition and the role of exhibitionary institutions in the creation of social knowledge. A central topic of discussion is the different practices and sites of exhibition of the Tree of Life sculpture in Britain and in Mozambique, in an endeavour to illustrate/establish the differences which determine and/or condition the specific approaches used in the two distinct cultural contexts within which it was exhibited.The discussion evolves towards exploring how a new discourse on the exhibition of contemporary African art questions and challenges both curatorial practices and cultural concepts of collecting, displaying and interpreting art objects and negotiating meaning.

    • Museums & museology
      February 2011

      Touching Art

      The Poetics and the Politics of Exhibiting the Tree of Life

      by Author(s): Maria Emília Fonseca

      This study focusses on the exhibition of the Tree of Life, a sculpture made in Mozambique of decommissioned, dismantled weapons, created to celebrate peace and commissioned by the British Museum, chosen to be the symbol of the “Africa 2005” season of cultural events and exhibited in its Great Court between February and October 2005. This artwork was first exhibited in Maputo before being dispatched to Britain and it is presently on display at the Sainsbury African Galleries of the British Museum, in London.This dissertation moves along two converging routes: the articulation of the meaning(s) produced within the exhibition and the role of exhibitionary institutions in the creation of social knowledge. A central topic of discussion is the different practices and sites of exhibition of the Tree of Life sculpture in Britain and in Mozambique, in an endeavour to illustrate/establish the differences which determine and/or condition the specific approaches used in the two distinct cultural contexts within which it was exhibited.The discussion evolves towards exploring how a new discourse on the exhibition of contemporary African art questions and challenges both curatorial practices and cultural concepts of collecting, displaying and interpreting art objects and negotiating meaning.

    • Poetry
      December 2015

      Light and Obscurity in Symbolism

      by Editor(s): Rosina Neginsky, Deborah Cibelli

      The idea of light and darkness is one of the central ideas of the Symbolist movement, since this is a movement of contrasts. It encompasses the major themes of Symbolism, such as good and evil, beauty and ugliness, the visible and the invisible, and the divine and the earthly. This volume brings together a range of studies in order to understand the notion of light and darkness and a variety of its Symbolist interpretations. It also stresses the interdisciplinary nature of the concepts of light and darkness in Symbolism, as well as the cohabitation and symbiosis of both, which are together or separately at the core of this movement.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      July 2014

      The Eye and the Beholder

      The Depiction of the Eye in Western Sculpture with Special Reference to the Period 1350–1700 and to Colour in Sculpture

      by Author(s): Hannelore Hägele

      In The Eye and the Beholder the author singles out a topic already touched upon in her previous book, Colour in Sculpture. By raising the question of how significant the colouring of the eye is to figurative representations of the late medieval and early modern period, Hannelore Hägele examines the different solutions open to the sculptor, which vary depending on historical and cultural parameters. The created eye must suit purpose and style. She discusses a number of unusual aspects of this: sculpted eyes in antiquity; the art and craft of polychromy; partial polychromy; emotions and expressions; the gaze and the glance; from the sculpted eye to colour and the glass eye; and what the eye cannot see. Dr Hägele asks whether advances in optics and other sciences, or theological concepts such as the eye of God and the inner eye, determined the way in which eyes were perceived and represented. It is the beholder, whether as maker or viewer, who engages with and judges the worth of any creative effort and what it contributes to an understanding of the seen and the unseen. The illustrations and the many coloured plates accompanying the text offer an overview of the subject.

    • Theory of Art
      February 2014

      Elemental Sculpture

      Theory and Practice

      by Author(s): Todor Todorov

      This book represents a research endeavour in the area of contemporary sculpture, describing an unexplored tendency in the development of the relationship between sculpture and the natural elements, referred to here as Elemental Sculpture. The studies included in this book reveal the context of locations where this kind of sculpture may be found – park, urban landscape, nature – and discuss the impact of these places on the development of sculpture.This book examines the tendency towards Elemental Sculpture as part of a new level of relationship between man and nature in arts and in general. It presents in-depth research of contemporary sculpture, the roots of Elemental Sculpture and its development in the works of such well-known sculptors as Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore, Alexander Calder, George Rickey, and Susumu Shingu, among others. Sculptures created by the author in the area of Elemental Sculpture during 35 years of his professional career are included and described from theoretical and practical points of view.

    • Painting & paintings
      December 2009

      Academics, Pompiers, Official Artists and the Arrière-garde

      Defining Modern and Traditional in France, 1900-1960

      by Editor(s): Natalie Adamson and Toby Norris

      Academics, Pompiers, Official Artists and the Arrière-garde: Defining Modern and Traditional in France, 1900-1960 is a collection of eight essays and a scholarly introduction by established and emerging scholars that challenges the continuing modernist slant of twentieth-century art history. The intention is not to perpetuate the vulgar opposition between avant-garde and reactionary art that characterized early-twentieth-century discourse and has marked much subsequent historical writing, but rather to investigate the complex relationship that both innovative and conservative artists had to the concept of tradition. How did artists and art critics conceive of tradition in relation to modernity? What was the role of an artist’s institutional positioning in determining expectations for his or her art? What light is thrown on the structure of the French art world by considering artists from abroad who worked in Paris? How did the war alter modernist and avant-garde paradigms and force crucial changes upon art production in the postwar period to 1960?Particular attention is paid to the terms academic, pompier, official, and arrière-garde, originally used to situate the more conservative artists and works as second-rate or as the negative foil to the assumed radicalism of the avant-garde. By re-evaluating the work of artists pushed to the historical margins by such polemical descriptors, and by proposing alternative understandings of the aesthetic, economic, institutional and political factors that drive our ideas of avant-gardism and the modernist narrative in France, this collection of essays offers new routes to explore the terrain of twentieth-century art in France.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      November 2015

      Choir Stalls in Architecture and Architecture in Choir Stalls

      by Editor(s): Fernando Villaseñor Sebastián, Mª Dolores Teijeira Pablos, Welleda Muller, Frédéric Billiet

      Misericordia International was founded by Elaine C. Block (Professor of the City University of New York) as an association dedicated to the study of choir stalls and their relation to other artistic manifestations during the Middle Ages, and the dissemination of research.From its beginnings, Misericordia International has promoted a bi-annual international conference as a place for scientific exchange among members of the research community interested in this topic (and in Medieval iconography in general) from a multidisciplinary approach. The most recent conference was a collaboration between the Universities of Cantabria, Oviedo and Leon in Spain. Titled “Choir Stalls in Architecture and Architecture in Choir Stalls”, it highlighted the importance that choir stalls had in the conceptualisation of space within cathedrals and how sculptors and carvers tested formal, stylistic and constructive motifs, models and solutions that were later reflected in architectural works.This book brings together the papers presented at this conference, and is divided into four thematic parts, namely “Space, liturgy and architectural conception”; “Symbolism and iconography”; “Study of outstanding examples”; and “Destructions, interventions and restorations”.

    • Museums & museology
      February 2011

      Touching Art

      The Poetics and the Politics of Exhibiting the Tree of Life

      by Author(s): Maria Emília Fonseca

      This study focusses on the exhibition of the Tree of Life, a sculpture made in Mozambique of decommissioned, dismantled weapons, created to celebrate peace and commissioned by the British Museum, chosen to be the symbol of the “Africa 2005” season of cultural events and exhibited in its Great Court between February and October 2005. This artwork was first exhibited in Maputo before being dispatched to Britain and it is presently on display at the Sainsbury African Galleries of the British Museum, in London.This dissertation moves along two converging routes: the articulation of the meaning(s) produced within the exhibition and the role of exhibitionary institutions in the creation of social knowledge. A central topic of discussion is the different practices and sites of exhibition of the Tree of Life sculpture in Britain and in Mozambique, in an endeavour to illustrate/establish the differences which determine and/or condition the specific approaches used in the two distinct cultural contexts within which it was exhibited.The discussion evolves towards exploring how a new discourse on the exhibition of contemporary African art questions and challenges both curatorial practices and cultural concepts of collecting, displaying and interpreting art objects and negotiating meaning.

    • Theory of Art
      February 2014

      Elemental Sculpture

      Theory and Practice

      by Author(s): Todor Todorov

      This book represents a research endeavour in the area of contemporary sculpture, describing an unexplored tendency in the development of the relationship between sculpture and the natural elements, referred to here as Elemental Sculpture. The studies included in this book reveal the context of locations where this kind of sculpture may be found – park, urban landscape, nature – and discuss the impact of these places on the development of sculpture.This book examines the tendency towards Elemental Sculpture as part of a new level of relationship between man and nature in arts and in general. It presents in-depth research of contemporary sculpture, the roots of Elemental Sculpture and its development in the works of such well-known sculptors as Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore, Alexander Calder, George Rickey, and Susumu Shingu, among others. Sculptures created by the author in the area of Elemental Sculpture during 35 years of his professional career are included and described from theoretical and practical points of view.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      July 2014

      The Eye and the Beholder

      The Depiction of the Eye in Western Sculpture with Special Reference to the Period 1350–1700 and to Colour in Sculpture

      by Author(s): Hannelore Hägele

      In The Eye and the Beholder the author singles out a topic already touched upon in her previous book, Colour in Sculpture. By raising the question of how significant the colouring of the eye is to figurative representations of the late medieval and early modern period, Hannelore Hägele examines the different solutions open to the sculptor, which vary depending on historical and cultural parameters. The created eye must suit purpose and style. She discusses a number of unusual aspects of this: sculpted eyes in antiquity; the art and craft of polychromy; partial polychromy; emotions and expressions; the gaze and the glance; from the sculpted eye to colour and the glass eye; and what the eye cannot see. Dr Hägele asks whether advances in optics and other sciences, or theological concepts such as the eye of God and the inner eye, determined the way in which eyes were perceived and represented. It is the beholder, whether as maker or viewer, who engages with and judges the worth of any creative effort and what it contributes to an understanding of the seen and the unseen. The illustrations and the many coloured plates accompanying the text offer an overview of the subject.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      November 2015

      Choir Stalls in Architecture and Architecture in Choir Stalls

      by Editor(s): Fernando Villaseñor Sebastián, Mª Dolores Teijeira Pablos, Welleda Muller, Frédéric Billiet

      Misericordia International was founded by Elaine C. Block (Professor of the City University of New York) as an association dedicated to the study of choir stalls and their relation to other artistic manifestations during the Middle Ages, and the dissemination of research.From its beginnings, Misericordia International has promoted a bi-annual international conference as a place for scientific exchange among members of the research community interested in this topic (and in Medieval iconography in general) from a multidisciplinary approach. The most recent conference was a collaboration between the Universities of Cantabria, Oviedo and Leon in Spain. Titled “Choir Stalls in Architecture and Architecture in Choir Stalls”, it highlighted the importance that choir stalls had in the conceptualisation of space within cathedrals and how sculptors and carvers tested formal, stylistic and constructive motifs, models and solutions that were later reflected in architectural works.This book brings together the papers presented at this conference, and is divided into four thematic parts, namely “Space, liturgy and architectural conception”; “Symbolism and iconography”; “Study of outstanding examples”; and “Destructions, interventions and restorations”.

    • Poetry
      December 2015

      Light and Obscurity in Symbolism

      by Editor(s): Rosina Neginsky, Deborah Cibelli

      The idea of light and darkness is one of the central ideas of the Symbolist movement, since this is a movement of contrasts. It encompasses the major themes of Symbolism, such as good and evil, beauty and ugliness, the visible and the invisible, and the divine and the earthly. This volume brings together a range of studies in order to understand the notion of light and darkness and a variety of its Symbolist interpretations. It also stresses the interdisciplinary nature of the concepts of light and darkness in Symbolism, as well as the cohabitation and symbiosis of both, which are together or separately at the core of this movement.

    • Theory of Art
      November 2018

      Abstraction Matters

      Contemporary Sculptors in Their Own Words

      by Editor(s): Cristina Baldacci, Michele Bertolini, Stefano Esengrini, Andrea Pinotti

      From the archaic funerary and sacred stones to the most recent three-dimensional objects, sculpture has been determined by a dualistic tension between the urge for imitation of natural forms (mimesis) and the desire to freely shape autonomous configurations (abstraction). Within such a complex history, the second half of the 20th century has been a particularly intense period. Besides their abstract works, many sculptors developed an extraordinarily rich theoretical discourse. This collection of essays presents some of the most eminent protagonists of this crucial historical moment by focusing on the artists’ “own words”. In their analysis, the contributors have followed three key-notions – “Sensation”, “Idea”, and “Language” – that fruitfully collect different artists under a common conceptual arch and show the aesthetic relevance of abstraction in sculpture. This book addresses high-level undergraduate and graduate students, as well as the scholarly community in the fields of aesthetics and art criticism, art history and art theory, visual, cultural and media studies.

    • The Arts
      March 2018

      The Image of the Feminine in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats and Angelos Sikelianos

      by Author(s): Anastasia Psoni

      Modernism, as a powerful movement, saw the literary and artistic traditions, as well as pure science, starting to evolve radically, creating a crisis, even chaos, in culture and society. Within this chaos, myth offered an ordered picture of that world employing symbolic and poetic images. Both W.B. Yeats and Angelos Sikelianos embraced myth and symbols because they liberate imagination and raise human consciousness, bringing together humans and the cosmos. Being opposed to the rigidity of scientific materialism that inhibits spiritual development, the two poets were waiting for a new age and a new religion, expecting that they, themselves, would inspire their community and usher in the change. In their longing for a new age, archaeology was a magnetic field for Yeats and Sikelianos, as it was for many writers and thinkers. After Sir Arthur Evans’s discovery of the Minoan Civilization where women appeared so peacefully prominent, the dream of re-creating a gynocentric mythology was no longer a fantasy.In Yeats’s and Sikelianos’s gynocentric mythology, the feminine figure appears in various forms and, like in a drama, it plays different roles. Significantly, a gynocentric mythology permeates the work of the two poets and this mythology is of pivotal importance in their poetry, their poetics and even in their life as the intensity of their creative desire brought to them female personalities to inspire and guide them.Indeed, in Yeats’s and Sikelianos’s gynocentric mythology, the image of the feminine holds a place within a historical context taking the reader into a larger social, political and religious space.

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