• The Arts
      December 1997

      Vom Klassizismus zur Spätromantik

      Zeichnungen und Aquarelle 1770–1860

      by Monika Schulte-Arndt

    • The Arts
      January 2018

      The Flower of Evil: Illustration Art of Aubrey Beardsley

      by by Aubrey Beardsley Edited by Wei Junlin

      This title collects illustrations, posters, and design works of Aubrey Beardsley, the characteristic illustrator in the 19th century. It is the most complete collection of his works in China, edited by Mr. Wei Junlin, painter and researcher of Beardsley.

    • Individual artists, art monographs
      January 2011

      Connections~Verbindungen

      Irish-German Perspectives through Etching

      by Author(s): Gerhardt Gallagher, Gisela Holfter and Mícheál Ó hAodha

      When artist Gerhardt Gallagher came across a series of etchings by his German grandmother Margarethe, it launched a sequence of events, which led to an exhibition and then this book. Magarethe’s artistic career had been severely disrupted by two wars and Gerhardt conceived a project, which would allow Margarethe’s works to be exhibited in Ireland along with his own. Gisela Holfter of the Centre for Irish-German Studies in the University of Limerick, when approached, supported the project enthusiastically and when Micheal O’Haodha of the Glucksman Library saw the works hanging there he thought them worthy of publication. Together they created this volume connecting Irish and German cultures through the work of two artists, a family history and the artistic links between both countries.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      July 2018

      Collecting Prints and Drawings

      by Editor(s): Andrea M. Gáldy, Sylvia Heudecker

      Cabinets of prints and drawings are found in the earliest art collections of Early Modern Europe. From the sixteenth century onwards, some of them acquired such fame that the necessity for an ordered and scientific display meant that a dedicated keeper was occasionally employed to ensure that fellow enthusiasts, as well as visiting diplomats, courtiers and artists, might have access to the print room. Often collected and displayed together with drawings, the prints formed a substantial part of princely collections which sometimes achieved astounding longevity as a specialised group of collectibles, such as the Florentine Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe at the Uffizi (GDSU).Prints and drawings, both bought and commissioned, were collected by princes and by private amateurs. Like the rest of their collections, the prints and drawings were usually preserved and displayed as part of, or near, the owner’s library in close proximity to scientific instruments, cut gems or small sculptural works of art. Both prints and drawings not only documented an encyclopaedic approach to the knowledge available at the time, but also depicted parts of the collections in the form of a paper museum. Prints and drawings also served as a guide to the collections. They spread their fame, and the renown of their owners, across Europe and into new worlds of collecting, both East and West.This volume explores issues such as: when, how and why did cabinets of prints and drawings become a specialised part of princely and private collections? How important were collections of prints and drawings for the self-representation of a prince or connoisseur among specialists and social peers? Is the presentation of a picture hanging in a gallery, for example by Charles Eisen for the Royal Galleries at Dresden, to be treated as documentary evidence? Are there notable differences in the approach to collecting, presentation and preservation of prints and drawings in diverse parts of the world? What was the afterlife of such collections up to the present day?

    • Prints & printmaking
      July 2010

      Creativity and Reproduction

      Nineteenth Century Engraving and the Academy

      by Author(s): Susanne Anderson-Riedel

      The study investigates the engravers’ rise within the French academic system and demonstrates their success in transforming a reproductive medium into a creative and original art genre. In the nineteenth century, graphic artists developed an artistic language that was independent and on par with the original model that they reproduced.The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture welcomed graphic artists into its ranks in 1655. As talented reproductive artists were able to disseminate works of art produced at the Academy, engravers rose to occupy administrative positions at the compagnie in the eighteenth century. Their success notwithstanding, graphic artists remained unable to overcome the perception of being reproductive artisans rather than creative and original fine artists. The proof of their predicament was the continuous refusal of advanced artistic training for graphic artists within the French academic system.The Section de Gravure at the Institut de France, established in 1803, was the first academic institution that distinguished between imitative and creative artistic execution in the reproductive graphic arts. Through patronage, the supervision of competitions, and the administration of the Prix de Rome program for graphic artists, the Engraving Department established specific guidelines for artistic reproduction and encouraged the formulation of an independent, artistic language in the reproductive arts. Finally, it defined the characteristics of fine engraving as a creative art medium.The Prix de Rome for engraving was crucial in consolidating the new understanding of engraving as an original art form. The engravers’ participation in the Grand Prix competition transformed their artisanal training practice in the master’s workshop into an artistic and academic education of graphic artists in the engraving ateliers. Furthermore, their sojourn at the French Academy in Rome encouraged the collegial collaboration between painters, sculptors, and engravers, leading engravers to develop a free and graphic interpretation of their model. The reproductive engraver was now able to rival painters and sculptors and, consequently, he emerged as a creative and original artist.

    • Prints & printmaking
      July 2010

      Creativity and Reproduction

      Nineteenth Century Engraving and the Academy

      by Author(s): Susanne Anderson-Riedel

      The study investigates the engravers’ rise within the French academic system and demonstrates their success in transforming a reproductive medium into a creative and original art genre. In the nineteenth century, graphic artists developed an artistic language that was independent and on par with the original model that they reproduced.The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture welcomed graphic artists into its ranks in 1655. As talented reproductive artists were able to disseminate works of art produced at the Academy, engravers rose to occupy administrative positions at the compagnie in the eighteenth century. Their success notwithstanding, graphic artists remained unable to overcome the perception of being reproductive artisans rather than creative and original fine artists. The proof of their predicament was the continuous refusal of advanced artistic training for graphic artists within the French academic system.The Section de Gravure at the Institut de France, established in 1803, was the first academic institution that distinguished between imitative and creative artistic execution in the reproductive graphic arts. Through patronage, the supervision of competitions, and the administration of the Prix de Rome program for graphic artists, the Engraving Department established specific guidelines for artistic reproduction and encouraged the formulation of an independent, artistic language in the reproductive arts. Finally, it defined the characteristics of fine engraving as a creative art medium.The Prix de Rome for engraving was crucial in consolidating the new understanding of engraving as an original art form. The engravers’ participation in the Grand Prix competition transformed their artisanal training practice in the master’s workshop into an artistic and academic education of graphic artists in the engraving ateliers. Furthermore, their sojourn at the French Academy in Rome encouraged the collegial collaboration between painters, sculptors, and engravers, leading engravers to develop a free and graphic interpretation of their model. The reproductive engraver was now able to rival painters and sculptors and, consequently, he emerged as a creative and original artist.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      July 2018

      Collecting Prints and Drawings

      by Editor(s): Andrea M. Gáldy, Sylvia Heudecker

      Cabinets of prints and drawings are found in the earliest art collections of Early Modern Europe. From the sixteenth century onwards, some of them acquired such fame that the necessity for an ordered and scientific display meant that a dedicated keeper was occasionally employed to ensure that fellow enthusiasts, as well as visiting diplomats, courtiers and artists, might have access to the print room. Often collected and displayed together with drawings, the prints formed a substantial part of princely collections which sometimes achieved astounding longevity as a specialised group of collectibles, such as the Florentine Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe at the Uffizi (GDSU).Prints and drawings, both bought and commissioned, were collected by princes and by private amateurs. Like the rest of their collections, the prints and drawings were usually preserved and displayed as part of, or near, the owner’s library in close proximity to scientific instruments, cut gems or small sculptural works of art. Both prints and drawings not only documented an encyclopaedic approach to the knowledge available at the time, but also depicted parts of the collections in the form of a paper museum. Prints and drawings also served as a guide to the collections. They spread their fame, and the renown of their owners, across Europe and into new worlds of collecting, both East and West.This volume explores issues such as: when, how and why did cabinets of prints and drawings become a specialised part of princely and private collections? How important were collections of prints and drawings for the self-representation of a prince or connoisseur among specialists and social peers? Is the presentation of a picture hanging in a gallery, for example by Charles Eisen for the Royal Galleries at Dresden, to be treated as documentary evidence? Are there notable differences in the approach to collecting, presentation and preservation of prints and drawings in diverse parts of the world? What was the afterlife of such collections up to the present day?

    • Prints & printmaking
      August 2015

      Printmaking Second Edition

      A Complete Guide to Materials & Processes

      by Bill Fick and Beth Grabowski

      Printmaking is a practical and comprehensive guide to printmaking techniques. This fully updated edition includes expanded chapters on digital and mixed media processes, and a brand new 'Print & Make' chapter, which explores the opportunities for creative expression within the many processes available to print makers. The more traditional techniques of relief, intaglio, collograph, lithography, screen printing and monoprint have also been refreshed with the addition of new images showing a broader range of subject matter, including more contemporary prints and international artists. Each technique is explored from the development of the printing or digital matrix, through the different stages of creation to image output. Guidance on how to set up a print studio, sections on troubleshooting techniques and the inclusion of up-to-date lists of suppliers, workshops and galleries make this an essential volume for beginner and experienced printmakers alike.

    • The Arts
      June 2018

      Perspectives on contemporary printmaking

      Critical writing since 1986

      by Ruth Pelzer-Montada

      This anthology, the first of its kind, presents thirty-two texts on contemporary prints and printmaking written from the mid-1980s to the present by authors from across the world. The texts range from history and criticism to creative writing. More than a general survey, they provide a critical topography of artistic printmaking during the period. The book is directed at an audience of international stakeholders in the field of contemporary print, printmaking and printmedia, including art students, practising artists, museum curators, critics, educationalists, print publishers and print scholars. It expands debate in the field and will act as a starting point for further research.

    • The Arts
      June 2018

      Perspectives on contemporary printmaking

      Critical writing since 1986

      by Ruth Pelzer-Montada

      This anthology, the first of its kind, presents thirty-two texts on contemporary prints and printmaking written from the mid-1980s to the present by authors from across the world. The texts range from history and criticism to creative writing. More than a general survey, they provide a critical topography of artistic printmaking during the period. The book is directed at an audience of international stakeholders in the field of contemporary print, printmaking and printmedia, including art students, practising artists, museum curators, critics, educationalists, print publishers and print scholars. It expands debate in the field and will act as a starting point for further research.

    • The Arts
      March 2019

      Making Prints and Thinking About It

      by Jan Svenungsson

      The book presents the entire graphic works of the artist Jan Svenungsson, who has been responsible Graphics and Printmaking at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna since 2011, accompanied by a text that seamlessly combines practical information, stories and speculations in an entertaining way. His overarching objective is to critically discuss the meaning of graphic prints in contemporary art, and more specifically: to illuminate the role of single-handedly "making" them – at a time when the conditions for exercising creativity are undergoing rapid change: What are the implications of the tools the artist selects? What does authenticity mean in today’s art? How does the role of the artist change when he makes himself dependent on artificial intelligence?

    • The Arts
      November 2019

      Hans Baldung Grien

      Neue Perspektiven auf sein Werk

      by Holger Jacob-Friesen, Oliver Jehle

      Die wissenschaftliche Beschäftigung mit dem Werk des Malers, Zeichners und Druckgraphikers Hans Baldung Grien ist rund 130 Jahre alt. Im Vergleich zu den Zeitgenossen Dürer, Grünewald oder Cranach erfuhr Baldung mit seinem sehr individuellen Beitrag zur deutschen Renaissance jedoch zu wenig Aufmerksamkeit. Der vorliegende Band hat sich der Aufgabe gestellt, Baldung neu in den Blick zu nehmen. Reich bebildert, versammelt er 25 Beiträge renommierter internationaler Forscherinnen und Forscher, die sich unterschiedlichen Aspekten im Schaffen des Straßburger Künstlers widmen. Hierzu zählen seine Zusammenarbeit mit Glasmalern, die kreative Verwandlung traditioneller Ikonographie, der medienreflexive Umgang mit der Helldunkel-Zeichnung, die rätselhaften Sündenfall- und Hexen-Darstellungen sowie sein Verhältnis zu Dürer.

    • The Arts
      July 2019

      Maximilianus

      Die Kunst des Kaisers

      by Lukas Madersbacher, Erwin Pokorny

      Kaiser Maximilian I. (1459–1519) gilt als Pionier der frühneuzeitlichen Medienrevolution. Er stellte das neue Medium der Druckgrafik in den Dienst seiner Selbstinszenierung. Die Ausstellung rekonstruiert die Entstehungsprozesse seiner aufwändigen Kunstprojekte und zeigt, in welch direkter Weise Maximilian diese in jeder Phase steuerte. In Beiträgen von 16 Experten wird diese gestaltende Rolle des Kaisers erstmals systematisch zum Thema.

    • The Arts
      December 2019

      Die Kunst der Interpretation

      Rubens und die Druckgraphik

      by Hans Jakob Meier

      Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) führte die Bildmedien Kupferstich und Holzschnitt zu einer koloristischen Qualität, die es in der Druckgrafik bis dahin nicht gegeben hatte. Die unter ihm geschaffenen Leistungen druckgrafischer Interpretation von Malerei markieren einen Wendepunkt für die gesamte weitere Entwicklung des Bilddrucks. Im Mittelpunkt des vorliegenden Buches steht in exemplarischer Auswahl die Analyse der einzelnen Schritte druckgrafischer Produktion, die unter der Aufsicht von Rubens nach dessen Gemälden geschaffen wurde. Das Spektrum umfasst – neben den Holzschnitten und Kupferstichen selbst – Ölskizzen, Gemälde, Zeichnungen, modelli und korrigierte Probedrucke. Das Buch folgt den Bänden zur französischen und italienischen Druckgrafik wird von einem umfänglichen themenbezogenen Quellenteil flankiert.

    • The Arts
      November 2019

      Hans Baldung Grien

      heilig | unheilig

      by Holger Jacob-Friesen

      Hans Baldung Grien war einer der außergewöhnlichsten deutschen Künstler der Renaissance:. In einer Epoche tiefgreifender Umwälzungen schuf er ein vielfältiges und eigenständiges Werk, das bis heute fasziniert. Der Katalog begleitet die Große Landesausstellung in der Staatlichen Kunsthalle Karlsruhe und umfasst rund 250 Exponate aus zahlreichen internationalen Sammlungen, darunter intime Andachtsbilder, leuchtende Glasgemälde, charaktervolle Porträts, humanistische Denkbilder und sinnliche Akte, zu denen auch die berühmten Sündenfalldarstellungen und die drastischen Hexenszenen zählen. Mit Einführungen und Exponat-Texten, die sich an ein breiteres Publikum richten, sowie vielen Abbildungen bietet er einen einzigartigen Überblick über das Werk dieses großen Malers, Zeichners und Druckgraphikers.

    • The Arts
      November 2019

      Hans Baldung Grien

      by Holger Jacob-Friesen

      Hans Baldung Grien was one of the most unusual German artists of the Renaissance. In an epoch of profound radical change, he created a varied and independent body of work that continues to fascinate us to this day. The catalogue accompanies a major regional exhibition at the Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe and features some 250 exhibits from numerous international collections, including intimate devotional pictures, luminous glass paintings, character portraits, and sensual nudes, among which can also be found the artist’s well-known representations of the Fall of Man (Adam and Eve) and his drastic witch scenes. With introductions and texts on exhibits aimed at a wider audience, as well as many illustrations, this publication offers a unique overview of the work of this great painter, draftsman and printmaker.

    • The Arts
      May 2020

      Zwischen "exemplum" und "opus absolutum"

      Studien zum Abzeichnen im italienischen Tre- und Quattrocento zwischen Mustertransfer und Kopie

      by Marion Heisterberg

      Im Italien des 14. und 15. Jahrhunderts avancierte das formmimetische Abzeichnen zu einer zentralen Tätigkeit in den Künstlerwerkstätten. Ökonomisierungsprozesse korrelierten mit einem neuartigen Bedürfnis nach Bildpropaganda, aber auch mit der Stilisierung bestimmter Künstler und ihrer Werke zu originellen und kanonischen Vorbildern. So entstanden Zeichnungen, die den Anspruch erheben, das Werk einer individuellen Künstlerpersönlichkeit als abgelöstes Ganzes (opus absolutum) zu transportieren: Im Unterschied zu zeichenhaft verweisenden Kopien scheint hier jedes Bildelement zwingend. Diese Tendenz steht in einem wechselvollen Spannungsverhältnis zu weiterlebenden Traditionen, in denen Vorbildliches als Muster (exemplum) weitergereicht oder bildthematische Vorgaben als iconographic guides nutzbar gemacht wurden.

    • The Arts
      February 2020

      Das Museum im Buch

      Paolo Giovios Elogia und die Porträtsammelwerke des 16. Jahrhunderts

      by Lea Hagedorn

      Der Basler Druckerverleger Pietro Perna legte mit seiner zwischen 1575 und 1578 gedruckten Neuausgabe der Schriften des italienischen Historikers Paolo Giovio ein für die Entwicklung des frühneuzeitlichen Porträtbuchs paradigmatisches Werk vor. Mehr als 200 Porträtkopien - gerissen vom oberrheinischen Künstler Tobias Stimmer - zieren die Bände der aufwendigen Schmuckedition. Mit ihnen verband sich das Versprechen einer ‚Übersetzung‘ von Giovios berühmter Sammlung in das gedruckte Buch. Die Studie untersucht Stimmers Bildnisse im Zusammenhang mit zeitgenössischen Porträttheorien und Authentizitätskonzepten sowie mit verlegerischen Vermarktungs- und Inszenierungsstrategien. Dabei wird die Spur der Porträts als kulturhistorische Sammlungsobjekte und Kopiervorlagen bis in die Neuzeit hinein verfolgt.

    • The Arts
      October 2018

      Grande Decorazione

      Italienische Monumentalmalerei in der Druckgraphik

      by Kurt Zeitler, Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München

      Katalog zur Ausstellung der Staatlichen Graphischen Sammlung München in der Pinakothek der Modernevom 13. Oktober 2018 bis 6. Januar 2019 Die italienische Kunst fand in der Monumentalmalerei der Renaissance und des Barock zu faszinierenden, oft überwältigenden Lösungen. Michelangelos »Sixtinische Decke«, das »Jüngste Gericht«, Fresken Raffaels und Annibale Carraccis zählen zu den eindrucksvollsten Schöpfungen der Kunstgeschichte. Über Jahrhunderte hinweg prägten Holzschnitte, Kupferstiche und Radierungen die Vorstellung von diesen Meisterwerken maßgeblich mit. Welche Strategien wurden entwickelt, die Dekorationen druckgraphisch zu inszenieren? Wie gelang es, Kuppelmalereien in die ebene Fläche des Papiers zu übertragen? Antwort auf diese Fragen geben hochkarätige Blätter und Montagen von Mantegna bis Tiepolo, von Andrea Andreani, Giulio Bonasone bis Carlo Cesio. Die Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München stellt in einer Überschau herausragende Beispiele dieses bisher wenig beachteten Zweiges der Druckgraphik in den Mittelpunkt. Der Ausstellungskatalog zeigt, wie sich Kunst in neue Kunst verwandelt, wie Komplexes und Großes ins leicht Lesbare und Handliche der Graphik übersetzt wurde. Neben ausgewählten Hauptwerken erfasst der Katalog den Gesamtbestand von fast 1.000 Blättern nach Wand- und Deckenbildern, unter anderem aufgeschlüsselt nach Druckgraphikern, erfi ndenden Malern und Orten.

    Subscribe to our newsletter