• History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      June 2010

      A Real Van Gogh

      How the Art World Struggles With Truth

      by Henk Tromp

      In 1928, after eleven years of extensive research and editing, Dr. Jacob Baart de la Faille finally finished the first catalogue raison of Vincent van Gogh's work. Soon after, however, de la Faille discovered that he had mistakenly listed dozens of forged works as genuine in the catalog. He quickly set out to set the record straight but was met with strong resistance from art dealers, collectors, critics, politicians, amongst others - all of whom had self-interested reasons to oppose his corrections. To this day, the international art world struggles to separate the real Van Goghs from the fake. A Real Van Gogh begins with the story of de la Faille and moves into the late decades of the twentieth century, outlining the numerous clashes over the authenticity of Van Gogh's works while simultaneously exposing the often bewildering ramifications for art critics and scholars when they bring unwelcome news.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      October 2014

      A Guide to the Modern and Contemporary Art Market

      Including Interviews with the Main International Players

      by Chiara Zampetti Egidi

      The only 'Guide to the Modern and Contemporary art market' of this kind. It is supported by the interviews to over 20 leading art market players (auction house directors, gallerists, art advisors, collectors...). In the appendix there are a lot of useful information, such as a precious dictionary of terms. It is thought for collectors, art investors, artists, journalists, curators, art market players, students and the general public. guidaalmercatodellarte.it

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      March 2010

      Christ of the Coal Yards

      A Critical Biography of Vincent van Gogh

      by Author(s): Harry Eiss

      No one heard the shot. No one ever found the gun. It was Sunday, July 27, 1890. Vincent had recently finished Wheatfield with Crows, thought to be his final painting, one that he described as representing “vast fields of wheat beneath troubled skies,” one where he said in a letter he meant to send to Theo “I did not need to go out of my way to try to express cheerlessness and extreme loneliness.” The letter never got sent, but was found stuffed in his smock. That morning, as usual, he walked out into the wheat fields with his easel, brushes, tubes of color and folding stool, perhaps hoping to reach his destination before the gang of local boys and girls were up and able to tease him and throw tomatoes. Le Crau, a wide plain of ripe grain, fields of citron, yellow, tan, and ochre, spread out beneath the bright Provencal sun. It’s safe to assume he heard the cicadas singing loudly, the swiping swishes of the farmers’ scythes already cutting through the rich wheat stalks, the gusts of wind whispering through the olive branches. Driven and filled with energy for months, he had been quickly, with an assurance that overcame and perhaps even came from his doubts and struggles, putting his own dramatic visions on canvas after canvas. But today he did not go into the fields to paint, or, perhaps, in the beginning he did, perhaps in the morning that was his intention. No one will ever know. He said he brought the revolver to frighten off the crows. Possibly that was his original intention when he included it with his lunch of bread and milk. In the end it‘s probably not relevant, except for the endless attempts to analyze him, to dig into his complex psyche, at once brilliant and yet impelled to self-destruction. The Ravoux family were sitting on the terrace of their café when he returned, a bit concerned because he was late, but not overly so. When he finally appeared, his walk was more uneven than usual, and he held his hand over his stomach. “Monsieur Vincent,” Mrs. Ravoux said, “we were worried, we are glad to see you come. Has anything bad happened?” “No, but I . . .” he left his reply unfinished as he passed inside. Mr. Ravoux followed him upstairs, where he found him sitting on his bed, facing the wall. “I wanted to kill myself.” This book is a critical examination of Vincent van Gogh that offers insights into his life, his religious beliefs, his relationships with women, and, of course, his paintings. It includes discussions of his letters, and responds to many of the previous works about him, dispelling some of the myths that have no foundation and pointing out how many of the claims made about him and many of the popular beliefs that have grown up around him are at best guesswork. It explores psychological, neurological, theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and historical paradigms for comprehending his enigmatic and enticing personality.

    • The Arts
      March 2015

      Mapping Degas

      Real Spaces, Symbolic Spaces and Invented Spaces in the Life and Work of Edgar Degas (1834-1917)

      by Author(s): Roberta Crisci-Richardson

      The New Art History and the Impressionist canon seem to have successfully claimed Edgar Degas as a misogynist, rabid nationalist and misanthrope whose art was both masterly and experimental. By analysing Degas’s approach to space and his self-fashioning attitude towards identity within the ambiguities of the political and artistic culture of nineteenth-century France, this book questions the characterisation of Degas as a right-wing Frenchman and artist, and will change the way in which Degas is thought about today.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      March 2010

      Christ of the Coal Yards

      A Critical Biography of Vincent van Gogh

      by Author(s): Harry Eiss

      No one heard the shot. No one ever found the gun. It was Sunday, July 27, 1890. Vincent had recently finished Wheatfield with Crows, thought to be his final painting, one that he described as representing “vast fields of wheat beneath troubled skies,” one where he said in a letter he meant to send to Theo “I did not need to go out of my way to try to express cheerlessness and extreme loneliness.” The letter never got sent, but was found stuffed in his smock. That morning, as usual, he walked out into the wheat fields with his easel, brushes, tubes of color and folding stool, perhaps hoping to reach his destination before the gang of local boys and girls were up and able to tease him and throw tomatoes. Le Crau, a wide plain of ripe grain, fields of citron, yellow, tan, and ochre, spread out beneath the bright Provencal sun. It’s safe to assume he heard the cicadas singing loudly, the swiping swishes of the farmers’ scythes already cutting through the rich wheat stalks, the gusts of wind whispering through the olive branches. Driven and filled with energy for months, he had been quickly, with an assurance that overcame and perhaps even came from his doubts and struggles, putting his own dramatic visions on canvas after canvas. But today he did not go into the fields to paint, or, perhaps, in the beginning he did, perhaps in the morning that was his intention. No one will ever know. He said he brought the revolver to frighten off the crows. Possibly that was his original intention when he included it with his lunch of bread and milk. In the end it‘s probably not relevant, except for the endless attempts to analyze him, to dig into his complex psyche, at once brilliant and yet impelled to self-destruction. The Ravoux family were sitting on the terrace of their café when he returned, a bit concerned because he was late, but not overly so. When he finally appeared, his walk was more uneven than usual, and he held his hand over his stomach. “Monsieur Vincent,” Mrs. Ravoux said, “we were worried, we are glad to see you come. Has anything bad happened?” “No, but I . . .” he left his reply unfinished as he passed inside. Mr. Ravoux followed him upstairs, where he found him sitting on his bed, facing the wall. “I wanted to kill myself.” This book is a critical examination of Vincent van Gogh that offers insights into his life, his religious beliefs, his relationships with women, and, of course, his paintings. It includes discussions of his letters, and responds to many of the previous works about him, dispelling some of the myths that have no foundation and pointing out how many of the claims made about him and many of the popular beliefs that have grown up around him are at best guesswork. It explores psychological, neurological, theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and historical paradigms for comprehending his enigmatic and enticing personality.

    • The Arts
      March 2015

      Mapping Degas

      Real Spaces, Symbolic Spaces and Invented Spaces in the Life and Work of Edgar Degas (1834-1917)

      by Author(s): Roberta Crisci-Richardson

      The New Art History and the Impressionist canon seem to have successfully claimed Edgar Degas as a misogynist, rabid nationalist and misanthrope whose art was both masterly and experimental. By analysing Degas’s approach to space and his self-fashioning attitude towards identity within the ambiguities of the political and artistic culture of nineteenth-century France, this book questions the characterisation of Degas as a right-wing Frenchman and artist, and will change the way in which Degas is thought about today.

    • Art & design styles: Impressionism & Post-Impressionism
      March 2012

      DEGAS: HIS LIFE AND WORKS IN 500 IMAGES

      An illustrated exploration of the artist, his life and context with a gallery of 300 of his finest paintings and sculptures

      by Jon Kear

      This sumptuous and informative book provides a detailed exploration of Degas' life and the times in which he lived, as well as featuring a gallery of 300 of his best-known and most loved works, including oil paintings, sketches, drawings, pastels, monoprints and sculptures. The first section provides a narrative to Degas' life, the influences that shaped his work, the themes that fascinated him and the development of his style. The second section contains the iconic images of ballet dancers, bathers, cafés, café-concerts and scenes of horse-racing for which Degas is famed: subjects that depicted the lifestyles of the haute bourgeoisie as well as working-class Parisians. A comprehensive reference book on the life and works of the influential Impressionist artist Edgar Degas, acknowledged as one of the greatest masters of all time. Offers a fascinating account of the artist's life, education, artistic influences and legacy, set in context of the turbulent social and political times in which he lived. Features an extensive gallery of pastels, drawings, oil paintings, sketches and sculptures set in chronological order of completion and accompanied by an analysis of the style and content of each work. CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE BOOK IN DIGITAL FORM

    Subscribe to our newsletter