• History of art & design styles: c 1800 to c 1900

      Nineteenth Century British Painting

      by Luke Herrmann

      Nineteenth Century British Painting provides a succinct and informative chronological survey of a century of British painting which produced a great variety of work. It progresses from the beginnings of Romanticism in the late eighteenth century to the British adoption of Impressionism in the late nineteenth, dividing this prolific period into nine parts. In each part the work of the major figures in particular movements or genres is discussed and analysed, and each painter is presented in a biographical context. The artists are set in the framework of their historical, social and economic background. The majority of the paintings and drawings that are examined in detail are reproduced in the 323 plates, 82 of them in colour.;The book is intended to be used more as an introduction, and where appropriate as a textbook, than as a work of reference, although its arrangement will enable readers to obtain fuller information about individual artists, with longer sections devoted to such major figures as Lawrence, Turner, Constable, Rossetti, Leighton and Whistler.;The last decade has seen a growing interest in nineteenth century British art in this country, and also in the United States and on the Continent. During this time much has been published in the field and there has been a succession of important exhibitions. Even so, there is no up-to-date and comprehensive survey of the whole century on the market. Nineteenth Century British Painting fills the gap, meeting the need for such a book among undergraduate and graduate students, and among connoisseurs and collectors. It will also have a strong appeal for people with a general interest in the period.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      June 2010

      A Real Van Gogh

      How the Art World Struggles With Truth

      by Henk Tromp

      In 1928, after eleven years of extensive research and editing, Dr. Jacob Baart de la Faille finally finished the first catalogue raison of Vincent van Gogh's work. Soon after, however, de la Faille discovered that he had mistakenly listed dozens of forged works as genuine in the catalog. He quickly set out to set the record straight but was met with strong resistance from art dealers, collectors, critics, politicians, amongst others - all of whom had self-interested reasons to oppose his corrections. To this day, the international art world struggles to separate the real Van Goghs from the fake. A Real Van Gogh begins with the story of de la Faille and moves into the late decades of the twentieth century, outlining the numerous clashes over the authenticity of Van Gogh's works while simultaneously exposing the often bewildering ramifications for art critics and scholars when they bring unwelcome news.

    • Business, Economics & Law
      October 2014

      A Guide to the Modern and Contemporary Art Market

      Including Interviews with the Main International Players

      by Chiara Zampetti Egidi

      The only 'Guide to the Modern and Contemporary art market' of this kind. It is supported by the interviews to over 20 leading art market players (auction house directors, gallerists, art advisors, collectors...). In the appendix there are a lot of useful information, such as a precious dictionary of terms. It is thought for collectors, art investors, artists, journalists, curators, art market players, students and the general public. guidaalmercatodellarte.it

    • Art & design styles: Arts & Crafts style
      September 2015

      Paper Dandy's Horrorgami

      20 Gruesome Scenes to Cut and Fold

      by Marc Hagan-Guirey

      Paper Dandy’s Horrorgami features 20 kirigami (cut-and-fold) designs based around haunted houses and scenes from horror films by the creator of the successful Horrorgami blog and exhibition. Each project features step-by-step instructions and a template that you remove from the book. You then follow the lines on the template, cutting and folding to make your own kirigami model. All you need is a scalpel, a cutting mat and a ruler. Clear cutting tips help you with the tricky stages and give you an order in which to complete your work, while photos of the finished model show you the final design. Projects are ranked from beginner to advanced. Suitable for folding experts and beginners alike, Paper Dandy’s Horrorgami makes the perfect Halloween activity.

    • Art & design styles: Arts & Crafts style
      February 2012

      Greatest Crafts & Projects For Children

      by Vikas Khatri

      54 Cool and awesome projects, crafts, experiments and more for kids!!! Unplugging kids from their MP3 players and game systems for one – on – one family time is a great way to reconnect in today’s hectic world. And what better way to spend time together than doing an activity that’s not only fun but also promotes creativity and self – expression? Greatest Crafts and Projects for Children is packed with 54 craft projects ranging from outdoor projects to gifts and party favors to holiday décor to projects to that promote learning through play with step – by – step instructions to guide children to successful completion of each projects. Filled with easy – to – follow instructions and fun Greatest Crafts and Projects for Children provides parents, caregivers and teachers with the tools they need to make the children recognise and cultivate the creativity within themselves along with fun.

    • The Arts
      December 2015

      The face of medicine

      Visualising medical masculinities in late nineteenth-century Paris

      by Mary Hunter, Amelia Jones, Marsha Meskimmon

      The face of medicine examines the overlapping worlds of art and medicine in late nineteenth-century France. It sheds new light on the relevance of the visual in medical and scientific cultures, and on the relationship between artistic and medical practices and imagery. By examining previously unstudied sources that traverse disciplinary boundaries, this original study rethinks the politics of medical representations and their social impact. Through a focused examination of paintings from the 1886 and 1887 Paris Salons that portray famous men from the medical and scientific elite - Louis Pasteur, Jules-Émile Péan and Jean-Martin Charcot - along with the images and objects that these men made for personal and occupational purposes, Hunter argues that artworks and medical collections played a key role in forming the public face of scientific medicine. The face of medicine is essential reading for scholars and students of art history, visual culture, gender studies, French history, museum studies and the medical humanities. ;

    • The Arts
      October 2013

      Placing faces

      The portrait and the English country house in the long eighteenth century

      by Gill Perry, Kate Retford, Jordan Vibert

      This book explores the rich but understudied relationship between English country houses and the portraits they contain. It features essays by well-known scholars such as Alison Yarrington, Gill Perry, Kate Retford, Harriet Guest, Emma Barker and Desmond Shawe-Taylor. Works discussed include grand portraits, intimate pastels and imposing sculptures. Moving between residences as diverse as Stowe, Althorp Park, the Vache, Chatsworth, Knole and Windsor Castle, it unpicks the significance of various spaces - the closet, the gallery, the library - and the ways in which portraiture interacted with those environments. It explores questions around gender, investigating narratives of family and kinship in portraits of women as wives and daughters, but also as mistresses and celebrities. It also interrogates representations of military heroes in order to explore the wider, complex ties between these families, their houses, and imperial conflict. This book will be essential reading for all those interested in eighteenth-century studies, especially for those studying portraiture and country houses. ;

    • History of art & design styles: c 1800 to c 1900
      January 2015

      Politics personified

      Portraiture, caricature and visual culture in Britain, c.1830–80

      by Henry Miller

      The remarkable popularity of political likenesses in the Victorian period is the central theme of this book, which explores how politicians and publishers exploited new visual technology to appeal to a broad public. The first study of the role of commercial imagery in nineteenth-century politics, Politics personified shows how visual images projected a favourable public image of politics and politicians. Drawing on a vast and diverse range of sources, this book highlights how and why politics was visualised. Beginning with an examination of the visual culture of reform, the book goes on to study how Liberals, Conservatives and Radicals used portraiture to connect with supporters, the role of group portraiture, and representations of Victorian MPs. The final part of the book examines how major politicians, including Palmerston, Gladstone and Disraeli, interacted with mass commercial imagery. The book will appeal to a broad range of scholars and students across political, social and cultural history, art history and visual studies, cultural and media studies and literature.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      June 2016

      Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’

      Photographic allegories of Victorian identity and empire

      by Jeff Rosen

      The Victorians admired Julia Margaret Cameron for her evocative photographic portraits of eminent men like Tennyson, Carlyle and Darwin. However, Cameron also made numerous photographs that she called 'Fancy subjects', depicting scenes from literature, personifications from classical mythology, and Biblical parables from the Old and New Testament. This book is the first comprehensive study of these works, examining Cameron's use of historical allegories and popular iconography to embed moral, intellectual and political narratives in her photographs. A work of cultural history as much as art history, this book examines cartoons from Punch and line drawings from the Illustrated London News, cabinet photographs and autotype prints, textiles and wall paper, book illustrations and lithographs from period folios, all as a way to contextualise the allegorical subjects that Cameron represented, revealing connections between her 'Fancy subjects' and popular debates about such topics as Biblical interpretation, democratic government and colonial expansion. ;

    • History of art & design styles: c 1800 to c 1900
      August 2016

      Civilisation and nineteenth-century art

      A European concept in global context

      by O'Brien

      Over the course of the long nineteenth century, Civilisation was the subject of some of the most prominent public mural paintings and sculptures in Europe and the United States, especially those that speculated on the direction of history. It also underpinned Western depictions of non-Western societies and evaluations of social progress and artistic excellence. The essays in this volume explore the ways in which the idea of Civilisation acted as a lens through which Europeans and Americans represented themselves and others, how this concept reshaped understandings of historical and artistic development, and also how it changed and was put to new uses as the century progressed. This collection will prove invaluable to students and academics in both history and art history.

    • The Arts
      September 2016

      Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’

      Photographic allegories of Victorian identity and empire

      by Jeff Rosen

      The Victorians admired Julia Margaret Cameron for her evocative photographic portraits of eminent men like Tennyson, Carlyle and Darwin. However, Cameron also made numerous photographs that she called 'Fancy subjects', depicting scenes from literature, personifications from classical mythology, and Biblical parables from the Old and New Testament. This book is the first comprehensive study of these works, examining Cameron's use of historical allegories and popular iconography to embed moral, intellectual and political narratives in her photographs. A work of cultural history as much as art history, this book examines cartoons from Punch and line drawings from the Illustrated London News, cabinet photographs and autotype prints, textiles and wall paper, book illustrations and lithographs from period folios, all as a way to contextualise the allegorical subjects that Cameron represented, revealing connections between her 'Fancy subjects' and popular debates about such topics as Biblical interpretation, democratic government and colonial expansion. ;

    • History of art & design styles: c 1800 to c 1900
      May 2017

      The Great Exhibition, 1851

      A sourcebook

      by Jonathon Shears

      The Great Exhibition, 1851: A sourcebook is the first anthology of its kind. It presents a comprehensive array of carefully selected primary documents, sourced from the period before, during and after the Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. Drawing on contemporary newspapers and periodicals, the archives of the Royal Commission, diaries, journals, celebratory poems and essays, many of these documents are reproduced in their entirety, and in the same place, for the first time. The book provides an unparalleled resource for teachers and students of the Exhibition and a starting point for researchers new to the subject. Subdivided into six chapters - Origins and organisation, Display, Nation, empire and ethnicity, Gender, Class and Afterlives - it represents the current scholarly debates about the Exhibition, orientating readers with helpful, critically informed, introductions. What was the Great Exhibition and what did it mean? Readers of The Great Exhibition, 1851: A sourcebook will take great pleasure in finding out.

    • History of art & design styles: c 1800 to c 1900
      May 2017

      The Great Exhibition, 1851

      A sourcebook

      by Jonathon Shears

      This book is the first anthology of its kind. It presents a comprehensive array of carefully selected primary documents, sourced from the period before, during and after the Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. Drawing on contemporary newspapers and periodicals, the archives of the Royal Commission, diaries, journals, celebratory poems and essays, many of these documents are reproduced in their entirety, and in the same place, for the first time. The book provides an unparalleled resource for teachers and students of the Exhibition and a starting point for researchers new to the subject. Subdivided into six chapters it represents the current scholarly debates about the Exhibition, orientating readers with helpful, critically informed, introductions. What was the Great Exhibition and what did it mean? Readers of The Great Exhibition, 1851 will take great pleasure in finding out.

    • The Arts
      September 2017

      The face of medicine

      Visualising medical masculinities in late nineteenth-century Paris

      by Mary Hunter, Amelia Jones, Marsha Meskimmon

      The face of medicine examines the overlapping worlds of art and medicine in late nineteenth-century France. It sheds new light on the relevance of the visual in medical and scientific cultures, and on the relationship between artistic and medical practices and imagery. By examining previously unstudied sources that traverse disciplinary boundaries, this original study rethinks the politics of medical representations and their social impact. Through a focused examination of paintings from the 1886 and 1887 Paris Salons that portray famous men from the medical and scientific elite - Louis Pasteur, Jules-Émile Péan and Jean-Martin Charcot - along with the images and objects that these men made for personal and occupational purposes, Hunter argues that artworks and medical collections played a key role in forming the public face of scientific medicine.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      The Great Exhibition, 1851

      A sourcebook

      by Jonathon Shears

      The Great Exhibition, 1851: A Sourcebook is the first anthology of its kind. It presents a comprehensive array of carefully selected primary documents, sourced from the period before, during and after the Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. Drawing on contemporary newspapers and periodicals, the archives of the Royal Commission, diaries, journals, celebratory poems and essays, many of these documents are reproduced in their entirety, and in the same place, for the first time. The book provides an unparalleled resource for teachers and students of the Exhibition and a starting point for researchers new to the subject. Subdivided into six chapters - Origins and organisation, Display, Nation, empire and ethnicity, Gender, Class and Afterlives - it represents the current scholarly debates about the Exhibition, orientating readers with helpful, critically informed, introductions. What was the Great Exhibition and what did it mean? Readers of The Great Exhibition, 1851: A Sourcebook will take great pleasure in finding out.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      May 2017

      The Great Exhibition, 1851

      A sourcebook

      by Jonathon Shears

      The Great Exhibition, 1851: A Sourcebook is the first anthology of its kind. It presents a comprehensive array of carefully selected primary documents, sourced from the period before, during and after the Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. Drawing on contemporary newspapers and periodicals, the archives of the Royal Commission, diaries, journals, celebratory poems and essays, many of these documents are reproduced in their entirety, and in the same place, for the first time. The book provides an unparalleled resource for teachers and students of the Exhibition and a starting point for researchers new to the subject. Subdivided into six chapters - Origins and organisation, Display, Nation, empire and ethnicity, Gender, Class and Afterlives - it represents the current scholarly debates about the Exhibition, orientating readers with helpful, critically informed, introductions. What was the Great Exhibition and what did it mean? Readers of The Great Exhibition, 1851: A Sourcebook will take great pleasure in finding out.

    • The Arts
      May 2016

      Politics personified

      Portraiture, caricature and visual culture in Britain, c.1830–80

      by Henry Miller

      The remarkable popularity of political likenesses in the Victorian period is the central theme of this book, which explores how politicians and publishers exploited new visual technology to appeal to a broad public. The first study of the role of commercial imagery in nineteenth-century politics, Politics personified shows how visual images projected a favourable public image of politics and politicians. Drawing on a vast and diverse range of sources, this book highlights how and why politics was visualised. Beginning with an examination of the visual culture of reform, the book goes on to study how Liberals, Conservatives and Radicals used portraiture to connect with supporters, the role of group portraiture, and representations of Victorian MPs. The final part of the book examines how major politicians, including Palmerston, Gladstone and Disraeli, interacted with mass commercial imagery. The book will appeal to a broad range of scholars and students across political, social and cultural history, art history and visual studies, cultural and media studies and literature.

    • The Arts
      May 2016

      Politics personified

      Portraiture, caricature and visual culture in Britain, c.1830–80

      by Henry Miller

      The remarkable popularity of political likenesses in the Victorian period is the central theme of this book, which explores how politicians and publishers exploited new visual technology to appeal to a broad public. The first study of the role of commercial imagery in nineteenth-century politics, Politics personified shows how visual images projected a favourable public image of politics and politicians. Drawing on a vast and diverse range of sources, this book highlights how and why politics was visualised. Beginning with an examination of the visual culture of reform, the book goes on to study how Liberals, Conservatives and Radicals used portraiture to connect with supporters, the role of group portraiture, and representations of Victorian MPs. The final part of the book examines how major politicians, including Palmerston, Gladstone and Disraeli, interacted with mass commercial imagery. The book will appeal to a broad range of scholars and students across political, social and cultural history, art history and visual studies, cultural and media studies and literature.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2017

      Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’

      Photographic allegories of Victorian identity and empire

      by Jeffrey Rosen

      The Victorians admired Julia Margaret Cameron for her evocative photographic portraits of eminent men like Tennyson, Carlyle and Darwin. However, Cameron also made numerous photographs that she called 'Fancy subjects', depicting scenes from literature, personifications from classical mythology, and Biblical parables from the Old and New Testament. This book is the first comprehensive study of these works, examining Cameron's use of historical allegories and popular iconography to embed moral, intellectual and political narratives in her photographs. A work of cultural history as much as art history, this book examines cartoons from Punch and line drawings from the Illustrated London News, cabinet photographs and autotype prints, textiles and wall paper, book illustrations and lithographs from period folios.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      September 2016

      Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’

      Photographic allegories of Victorian identity and empire

      by Jeffrey Rosen

      'Much more than a standard history, Rosen's expansive text locates, quite forensically, what is perhaps one of the most important functions of Cameron's fancies for viewers today: to trace outward, from her immediate personal, literary, and visual communities, a nexus of contentious religious, colonial and nationalist debates that helped shape, not just Cameron and her work, but the Victorian psyche itself.' Katherine Parhar, Independent Scholar, Visual Culture in Britain, 2016 'Rosen's well-illustrated study represents a valuable resource for scholars and critics alike, and I have already recommended it to my own students. In addition to its appeal to those working on Cameron and her contemporaries, the book contains rich material for those intrigued by the visual cultural history of the nineteenth century more generally.' - Lindsay Smith, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, Early Popular Visual Culture 'Rosen has provided an astonishingly interdisciplinary, thoroughly researched study of Cameron's intellectual range and her technical and exhibitionary practices. He coordinates material and philosophical content discursively to raise intriguing ambiguities and to problematize common assumptions about Cameron. In doing so, Rosen reveals Cameron as a deeply intellectually engaged photographer whose works not only embodied but also shaped the philosophical cross-currents of her day.' Julie Codell, History of Photography (Taylor & Francis) December 2016 'The overworked persona of Cameron-a cartoonish figure of Freshwater fame, eccentric, domineering, least-beautiful of the Pattle sisters, forever chasing down Tennyson and his guests with her camera, forcing her servants to participate in long sessions of posing so that the household had to live off eggs and bacon-is put firmly to the side in Jeff Rosen's painstaking, revelatory, and serious assessment of the allegorical photographs. What matters to Rosen, and, it turns out, to the photographs themselves, is history: the political exigencies of the ten-year span in which these images were made, and in which their maker intended them to make sense.' Jennifer Green-Lewis of George Washington University

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