• History
      December 2015

      Rembrandt

      The Painter Thinking

      by Ernst van de Wetering

      Even during the artist’s lifetime, contemporary art lovers considered Rembrandt van Rijn to be an exceptional artist. In this revelatory sequel to the acclaimed Rembrandt: The Painter at Work, renowned Rembrandt authority Ernst van de Wetering investigates precisely why the artist, from a very early age, was praised by prominent connoisseurs. He argues that Rembrandt, from his very first endeavors in painting, embarked on a journey past all the foundations of the art of painting that, according to (up till now misinterpretated) contemporary written sources, were considered essential in the seventeenth century. Rembrandt never stopped searching for solutions to the pictorial problems that confronted him; this led over time to radical changes in course that can’t simply be attributed to stylistic evolution or natural development. In a quest as rigorous and novel as the artist’s, Van de Wetering reveals how Rembrandt became the best painter the world had ever seen. Gorgeously illustrated throughout, this groundbreaking exploration reconstructs Rembrandt’s closely guarded theories and methods, shedding new light both on the artist’s exceptional accomplishments and on the practice of painting in the Dutch Golden Age.

    • History of art & design styles: c 1600 to c 1800
      August 2013

      Europe and the Empire during the Thirty Years‘ War

      History of a European conflict

      by Christoph Kampmann

      The Thirty Years‘ War originated from political sectarian disputes in the Holy Roman Empire, but then became one of the biggest war disasters of modern times, in which many European powers were involved. How the conflict could take on such a destructive dynamic is the question that lies at the heart of the book. As a peace settlement failed to materialise in the Empire, the trouble spots in Europe gradually and unstoppably spread through the Empire. That is how the war entered its devastating escalation phase and finally became a European conflict. The warfare, the composition of the mercenary armies and finally the Peace Congress that ended the war were also European.

    • History of art & design styles: c 1600 to c 1800
      July 2014

      Chinoiserie

      Commerce and critical ornament in eighteenth-century Britain

      by Stacey Sloboda

      In a critical reassessment of chinoiserie, a style both praised and derided for its triviality, prettiness and ornamental excesses, Stacey Sloboda argues that chinoiserie was no mute participant in eighteenth-century global consumer culture, but was instead a critical commentator on that culture. Analysing ceramics, wallpaper, furniture, garden architecture and other significant examples of British and Chinese design, this book takes an object-focused approach to studying the cultural phenomenon of the 'Chinese taste' in eighteenth-century Britain. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the critical history of design and the decorative arts in the period, and students and scholars of art history, material culture, eighteenth-century studies and British history will find a novel approach to studying the decorative arts and a forceful argument for their critical capacities.

    • History of art & design styles: c 1600 to c 1800
      October 2014

      Material goods, moving hands

      Perceiving production in England, 1700–1830

      by Kate Smith

      In eighteenth-century Britain, greater numbers of people entered the marketplace and bought objects in ever-greater quantities. As consumers rather than producers, how did their understandings of manufacturing processes and the material world change? Material goods and moving hands combines material culture and visual culture approaches to explore the different ways in which manufacturers and retailers presented production to consumers during the eighteenth century. It shows how new relationships with production processes encouraged consumers, retailers, designers, manufacturers and workers to develop conflicting understandings of production. Objects then were not just markers of fashion and taste, they acted as important conduits through which people living in Georgian Britain could examine and discuss their material world and the processes and knowledge that rendered it.

    • The Arts
      January 2013

      The face of the city

      Civic portraiture and civic identity in early modern England

      by Robert Tittler, Peter Lake, Anthony Milton, Jason Peacey, Alexandra Gajda

      Our conventional understanding of English portraiture from the age of Holbein and Henry VIII on to Reubens, VanDyck and Charles I clings to the mainstream images of royalty and aristocracy and to the succession of known practitioners of 'Renaissance' portraiture. In almost every respect, the 'civic' portraits examined here stand in sharp contrast to these traditional narratives. Depicting mayors and aldermen, livery company masters, school and college heads, they were meant to be read as statements about the civic leaders and civic institutions rather than about the sitters in their own right. Displayed in civic premises rather than country homes, exemplifying civic rather than personal virtues, and usually commissioned by institutions rather than their sitters, they have yet to be considered as a type of their own, or in their appropriate social and political context. This fascinating work will appeal to both art historians and historians of early modern Britain. ;

    • The Arts
      August 2011

      Vertiginous Mirrors

      The animation of the visual image and early modern travel

      by Rose Marie San Juan, Amelia Jones, Marsha Meskimmon

      In early modern Europe, the visual image began to move, not only as it traveled across great distances but also due to the introduction of innovative visual formats that produced animation within the image itself. This book traces the arduous journeys of visual images through evidence of their use and reproduction along missionary routes from Europe to India, Japan, China, Brazil and Chile. It argues that missionary world travel was crucial to the early modern re-animation of the image through devices such as the reflection of the mirror, the multiple registers of vision of the anthropomorphic image, the imaginative and disorienting possibilities of the utopic image, and even the reconstitution of the sacred image with memories of the relation of travel to life and death. Within the journeys traced in the book, the visual image forged new connections between different locations and across different cultures, accumulating increasingly entangled histories. Even more intriguingly, these images frequently returned to Europe, changed but still recognisable, there to be used again with an awareness of their earlier travels. ;

    • Art & design styles: Baroque
      October 2016

      The matter of miracles

      Neapolitan baroque architecture and sanctity

      by Series edited by Amelia Jones, Helen Hills, Marsha Meskimmon

      This book investigates baroque architecture through the lens of San Gennaro's miraculously liquefying blood in Naples. This vantage point allows a bracing and thoroughly original rethink of the power of baroque relics and reliquaries. It shows how a focus on miracles produces original interpretations of architecture, sanctity and place which will engage architectural historians everywhere. The matter of the baroque miracle extends into a rigorous engagement with natural history, telluric philosophy, new materialism, theory and philosophy. The study will transform our understanding of baroque art and architecture, sanctity and Naples. Bristling with new archival materials and historical insights, this study lifts the baroque from its previous marginalisation to engage fiercely with materiality and potentiality and thus unleash baroque art and architecture as productive and transformational.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      The challenge of the sublime

      From Burke’s <i>Philosophical Enquiry</i> to British Romantic art

      by Hélène Ibata, Anne Dunan-Page

      This book examines the links between the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain and eighteenth-century theories of the sublime. Edmund Burke's Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757), in particular, is shown to have directly or indirectly challenged visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and visual media such as panoramas and book illustrations, by arguing that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. This interdisciplinary study addresses researchers in the fields of art history, visual studies and aesthetics alike.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      The challenge of the sublime

      From Burke’s <i>Philosophical Enquiry</i> to British Romantic art

      by Hélène Ibata, Anne Dunan-Page

      This book examines the links between the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain and eighteenth-century theories of the sublime. Edmund Burke's Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757), in particular, is shown to have directly or indirectly challenged visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and visual media such as panoramas and book illustrations, by arguing that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. This interdisciplinary study addresses researchers in the fields of art history, visual studies and aesthetics alike.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      February 2018

      The challenge of the sublime

      From Burke’s <i>Philosophical Enquiry</i> to British Romantic art

      by Hélène Ibata, Anne Dunan-Page

      This book examines the links between the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain and eighteenth-century theories of the sublime. Edmund Burke's Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757), in particular, is shown to have directly or indirectly challenged visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and visual media such as panoramas and book illustrations, by arguing that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. This interdisciplinary study addresses researchers in the fields of art history, visual studies and aesthetics alike.

    • The Arts
      December 2017

      Colouring the Caribbean

      Race and the art of Agostino Brunias

      by Mia L. Bagneris, Amelia Jones

      Colouring the Caribbean offers the first comprehensive study of Agostino Brunias's intriguing pictures of colonial West Indians of colour - so called 'Red' and 'Black' Caribs, dark-skinned Africans and Afro-Creoles, and people of mixed race - made for colonial officials and plantocratic elites during the late-eighteenth century. Although Brunias's paintings have often been understood as straightforward documents of visual ethnography that functioned as field guides for reading race, this book investigates how the images both reflected and refracted ideas about race commonly held by eighteenth-century Britons, helping to construct racial categories while simultaneously exposing their constructedness and underscoring their contradictions. The book offers provocative new insights about Brunias's work gleaned from a broad survey of his paintings, many of which are reproduced here for the first time.

    • The Arts
      December 2017

      Colouring the Caribbean

      Race and the art of Agostino Brunias

      by Mia L. Bagneris, Amelia Jones

      Colouring the Caribbean offers the first comprehensive study of Agostino Brunias's intriguing pictures of colonial West Indians of colour - so called 'Red' and 'Black' Caribs, dark-skinned Africans and Afro-Creoles, and people of mixed race - made for colonial officials and plantocratic elites during the late-eighteenth century. Although Brunias's paintings have often been understood as straightforward documents of visual ethnography that functioned as field guides for reading race, this book investigates how the images both reflected and refracted ideas about race commonly held by eighteenth-century Britons, helping to construct racial categories while simultaneously exposing their constructedness and underscoring their contradictions. The book offers provocative new insights about Brunias's work gleaned from a broad survey of his paintings, many of which are reproduced here for the first time.

    • The Arts
      December 2017

      Colouring the Caribbean

      Race and the art of Agostino Brunias

      by Mia L. Bagneris, Amelia Jones

      Colouring the Caribbean offers the first comprehensive study of Agostino Brunias's intriguing pictures of colonial West Indians of colour - so called 'Red' and 'Black' Caribs, dark-skinned Africans and Afro-Creoles, and people of mixed race - made for colonial officials and plantocratic elites during the late-eighteenth century. Although Brunias's paintings have often been understood as straightforward documents of visual ethnography that functioned as field guides for reading race, this book investigates how the images both reflected and refracted ideas about race commonly held by eighteenth-century Britons, helping to construct racial categories while simultaneously exposing their constructedness and underscoring their contradictions. The book offers provocative new insights about Brunias's work gleaned from a broad survey of his paintings, many of which are reproduced here for the first time.

    • The Arts
      November 2016

      Die Bildsprache Michelangelos

      by Edgar Wind, Pablo Schneider

      1936 stellte der Kunsthistoriker und Philosoph Edgar Wind sein Manuskript zu Michelangelos Deckenfresken der Sixtinischen Kapelle fertig. Wind begriff den christlichen Erlösungsgedanken als fundamentales Thema des gesamten Raumes und erkannte ein polares Beziehungsgeflecht, welches ihm das Bildprogramm vollständig erschloss. Methodische Ansätze Aby Warburgs aufnehmend, dessen Mitarbeiter Wind in Hamburg war, analysierte er die Themenwahl Michelangelos. Obwohl fertiggestellt, wurde das Werk nie veröffentlicht. Es liegt nun erstmals in gedruckter Fassung vor, begleitet von einem ausführlichen Nachwort des Herausgebers.

    • The Arts
      February 2019

      Galileo’s Thinking Hand

      Form and Research Around 1600

      by Horst Bredekamp

    • The Arts
      June 2018

      Rahmen und frames

      Dispositionen des Visuellen in der Kunst der Vormoderne

      by Daniela Wagner, Fridericke Conrad

      Der Rahmen ist in der Kunstgeschichte mittlerweile mehr als die Einfassung eines Bildwerks: Ins Zentrum des Interesses ist gerückt, dass rahmende Strukturen Wahrnehmung steuern, Kommunikationsstrukturen etablieren und damit auch konzeptuelle frames erzeugen. Ausgehend von diesem Verständnis des Rahmens als multifunktionales Element, versammelt der Band Fallstudien aus Architektur, Malerei und Skulptur, die das funktionale, ästhetische und reflexive Potential von Rahmungen erörtern. Die einzelnen Beiträge umspannen den Zeitraum zwischen dem 4. und dem 18. Jahrhundert und zeigen, dass der durch das Zusammenwirken von Form, Struktur und Inhalt gebildete frame ein epochen- und medienunabhängiges künstlerisches Konzept darstellt.

    • The Arts
      February 2019

      Nature and the Arts in Early Modern Naples

      by Frank Fehrenbach, Joris van Gastel

      The literary, artistic, and scientific culture of early modern Naples is closely linked to the natural topography of the city, stretching from Iacopo Sannazaro’s poetic evocation of the Campania landscape to Giambattista Vico’s approach in which he anchors human civilization to the existential confrontation with natural forces. With the open sea, the rocky coastline, and the menacing presence of Vesuvius, the image of Naples, more than any other city in early modern times, is associated in the collective imagination with the forces of nature. Even the populace was interpreted as a force of nature. In this volume, art, literature, and science historians investigate the convergence of culture and nature in a unique geographic context.

    • The Arts
      November 2016

      Bildbetrachtung in Bewegung

      Der Rezipient in Texten und Bildern zur Pariser Salonausstellung des 18. Jahrhunderts

      by Anja Weisenseel

      Der heutige Museumsbesucher orientiert sich an eingeübten Verhaltensmustern, die eine eigene Geschichte haben. In dieser Studie wird am Beispiel der Jahresausstellungen der königlichen Kunstakademie im Louvre untersucht, wie sich Normen einer öffentlichen Kunstbetrachtung im Zeitalter der Aufklärung etablierten und schließlich hinterfragt wurden. Erstmalig wird auf Basis eines umfassenden und kritischen Quellenstudiums herausgearbeitet, wie sich das Verständnis von einem passiv bewundernden hin zu einem kreativ (mit)gestaltenden, körperlich wie emotional bewegten Bildbetrachter entwickelte. Die genaue Analyse der sich wandelnden Diskurse über Rezeptionsgewohnheiten, die in Texten und Bildern der Zeit sichtbar werden, vermag auch den Blick auf „moderne" Rezeptionsbedingungen zu schärfen.

    • Painting & paintings

      Vermeer

      by Lawrence Gowing

      "Vermeer" is considered by some to be one of the most profound books ever written on the artist. The text has been updated for this third edition to appear in paperback. The volume also includes an essay on Vermeer, "Counterfeiter of Grace", written by the author shortly before his death in which he sums up current Vermeer research. All the illustrations used have been newly reproduced for the reissue of this classic work in the field of art history.

    • History of Art / Art & Design Styles
      March 2015

      Confronting the Golden Age

      Imitation and Innovation in Dutch Genre Painting 1680-1750

      by Junko Aono

      Is it possible to talk about Dutch art after 1680 outside the prevailing critical framework of the "age of decline"? Although an increasing number of studies are being published on the art and society of this period, genre painting of this era continues to be dismissed as an uninspired repetition of the art of the second and third quarters of the seventeenth century, known as the Dutch Golden Age/ In this stunningly illustrated study, Aono reconsiders the long-dismissed genre painting from 1680-1750. Grounded in close analysis of a range of paintings and primary sources, this study illuminates the main features of genre painting, highlighting the ways in which these elements related to the painters' close connections to, on the one hand, collectors, and on the other, to classicism, one of the dominant artistic styles of that time. Three case studies, richly supplemented by a catalogue of 29 selected painters and their work, offer the first clear picture of the genre painting of the period while providing new insights into painters' activities, collectors' tastes and the contemporary art market.

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