• Memoirs
      March 2012

      Dancing Through History

      In Search of the Stories That Define Canada

      by Lori Henry

      In Dancing Through History, Henry crosses Canada's vast physical and ethnic terrain to uncover how its various cultures have evolved through their dances. Her coast-to-coast journey takes her to Haida Gwaii in British Columbia, where she witnesses the seldom seen animist dances of the islands' First Nation people. In the Arctic, Henry partakes in Inuit drum dancing, kept alive by a new generation of Nunavut youth. And in CapeBreton, she uncovers the ancient "step dance" of the once culturally oppressed Gaels of Nova Scotia. During her travels, Henry discovers that dance helps to break down barriers and encourage cooperation between people with a history of injustice. Dance, she finds, can provide key insight into what people value most as a culture, which is often more similar than it seems. It is this kind of understanding that goes beyond our divisive histories and gives us compassion for one another. Unique to this book, Dancing Through History includes first person interviews with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (Canada's Aboriginal groups) talking about their traditions and the effect colonisation has had on them, all through the lens of dance. Their voices are given ample space to speak for themselves – what is revealed is a beautiful worldview and many lessons to be learned in order to have a healthy planet and tolerant people as we move into the future. Book Details: This is an adult non-fiction book of Canadian content. The target market is curious travellers and those interested in culture beyond the typical tourist traps. Sales have ranged from junior high schools to retired baby boomers. Interested publishers can make an offer directly on the profile page to buy available rights.

    • The Arts
      November 2011

      Timed out

      Art and the transnational Caribbean

      by Leon Wainwright, Amelia Jones, Marsha Meskimmon

      'Timed out' is a pioneering study of modern and contemporary art in the aftermath of empire. It addresses the current 'global turn' in the study of art by way of the transnational Caribbean, offering an in-depth account of the Atlantic world in relation to the mainstream history of art. It looks at why art of the Anglophone Caribbean and its diaspora have been placed not only 'outside' but 'behind' the dominant art canons, and how the politics of space and time can be used to rethink the global geography of art. This is an essential addition to the growing field of 'world art studies', bringing concerns around temporality together with cross-cultural issues and debates. It shows how art and artists of the Caribbean have encountered and challenged the charges of belatedness, anachronism, provincialism and marginalisation that are fundamental to the time-space logic of art history. ;

    • The Arts
      November 2011

      Timed out

      Art and the transnational Caribbean

      by Leon Wainwright, Amelia Jones, Marsha Meskimmon

      'Timed out' is a pioneering study of modern and contemporary art in the aftermath of empire. It addresses the current 'global turn' in the study of art by way of the transnational Caribbean, offering an in-depth account of the Atlantic world in relation to the mainstream history of art. It looks at why art of the Anglophone Caribbean and its diaspora have been placed not only 'outside' but 'behind' the dominant art canons, and how the politics of space and time can be used to rethink the global geography of art. This is an essential addition to the growing field of 'world art studies', bringing concerns around temporality together with cross-cultural issues and debates. It shows how art and artists of the Caribbean have encountered and challenged the charges of belatedness, anachronism, provincialism and marginalisation that are fundamental to the time-space logic of art history. ;

    • Teaching, Language & Reference
      December 2017

      Sustainable art communities

      Contemporary creativity and policy in the transnational Caribbean

      by Leon Wainwright, Kitty Zijlmans

      This collection sets out a range of perspectives on the challenges that the Caribbean is facing today, showing how the arts hold a crucial role in forging a more sustainable Caribbean community. It forcefully attests to the view that visual art in particular has a specific contribution to make and that this in turn means striving to foster a sustainable arts community that can contend with an environment of uneven infrastructure, opportunity and public awareness. Spanning the scholarly, artistic and professional fields of arts and heritage, this book compares two of the Caribbean's key linguistic regions - the Anglophone and the Dutch - to address the themes of global-local relations, capital, patronage, morality, contestation, sustainability and knowledge exchange. The result is a milestone of collaboration from diverse global settings of the Caribbean and its diaspora, including Jamaica, the Bahamas, Barbados, Suriname, Curaçao, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany and the United States.

    • The Arts
      June 2018

      Tomb – Memory – Space

      Concepts of Representation in Premodern Christian and Islamic Art

      by Francine Giese, Anna Pawlak, Markus Thome

      From an intercultural perspective, this book focuses on aesthetic strategies and forms of representation in premodern Christian and Islamic sepulchral art. Seeing the tomb as an interface for eschatological, political, and artistic debate, the contributions analyze the diversity of memorial space configurations. The subjects range from the complex interaction between architecture and tomb topography through to questions relating to the funereal expression of power and identity, and to practices of ritual realization in the context of individual and collective memory.

    • The Arts
      December 2017

      The Indigenous Lens?

      Early Photography in the Near and Middle East

      by Markus Ritter, Staci G. Scheiwiller

      The historiography of early photography has scarcely examined Islamic countries in the Near and Middle East, although the new technique was adopted very quickly there by the 1840s. Which regional, local, and global aspects can be made evident? What role did autochthonous image and art traditions have, and which specific functions did photography meet since its introduction? This collective volume deals with examples from Iran, the Ottoman Empire, and the Arab lands and with the question of local specifics, or an „indigenous lens." The contributions broach the issues of regional histories of photography, local photographers, specific themes and practices, and historical collections in these countries. They offer, for the first time in book form, a cross-section through a developing field of the history of photography.

    • The Arts
      August 2017

      Die Residenz des Kalifen Hārūn ar-Rašīd in ar-Raqqa/ar-Rāfiqa (Syrien)

      by Ulrike Siegel

      Mit der Publikation, die sich mit der Residenz des Kalifen Harun ar-Rasid (reg. 786–809) in ar-Raqqa/ar-Rafiqa in Nordsyrien befasst, werden neue Erkenntnisse zur frühislamischen Architekturentwicklung vorgelegt und eine fast ein Jahrhundert umfassende Überlieferungslücke (Mitte 8. bis Mitte 9. Jh. n. Chr.) zu einem großen Teil geschlossen. Die Untersuchung arbeitet das Grabungsprojekt des DAI auf, das aufgrund der Entwicklung der modernen Stadt ar-Raqqa von 1982 bis 1994 im akut gefährdeten Ruinengelände durchgeführt wurde. Forschungsschwerpunkt ist die Auswertung der archäologischen Ergebnisse am Ostpalast, Ostkomplex, Nordkomplex und Nordostkomplex. Die Baubefunde werden analysiert, die Bau- und Nutzungsgeschichte herausgearbeitet, die Gebäudekonzeptionen und funktionalen Bestimmungen geklärt sowie eine architektonische Wertung vorgenommen. Darüber hinaus werden anhand der Verknüpfung von historischen Luftbildern, Schriftquellen und bauforscherischen Einzelergebnissen Erkenntnisse zum Konzept der Residenz vorgelegt und die vier Gebäudekomplexe nicht als isolierte Baukörper, sondern als Teil eines städtebaulichen und architektonischen Großprojekts betrachtet. Die Untersuchung leistet somit Grundlagenforschung für die frühislamische Architekturgeschichte, deren frühabbasidischen Bauten bislang nur in geringer Zahl untersucht worden sind.

    • The Arts
      April 2017

      Genealogy, Archive, Image

      Interpreting Dynastic History in Western India, c.1090-2016

      by Angma Jhala, Jayasinhji Jhala

      ‘Genealogy, Archive, Image’ addresses the ways in which history and tradition are ‘reinvented’ through text, memory and painting. It examines the making of dynastic history in the kingdom of Jhalavad, situated in Gujarat, western India, over the longue durée, from the eleventh to twentieth centuries. The essays critique a collection of contemporary miniature paintings, which chart the dynastic history of Jhalavad’s rulers and the textual and ethnographic archive upon which they are based. A multidisciplinary work, it crosses the boundaries of history, anthropology, folklore and mythology, gender, musicology, literary studies, and visual, film and digital media. The essays draw upon a variety of voices, spanning various religious and ethnic communities, including Hindus, Muslims, Jains, Parsees and Siddhi Africans, and caste identities, such as that of the bard, ballad singer, king, priest, court chronicler, soldier, mason and drummer De Gruyter Open apologizes for the fact that the April 2017 edition of the book titled ‘Genealogy, Archive, Image: Interpreting Dynastic History in Western India, c.1090-2016’, published by De Gruyter Open, included on pages 72, 79 and 80 text originating from the website http://www.royalark.net/India/dhranga8.htm, the editor of which is Mr. Christopher Buyers, which text presented the results of Mr Christopher Buyers’s research and was included in that edition without reference to its source. These three passages were inserted by Jayasinhji Jhala without the knowledge of John McLeod, the author of the chapter in which they appeared.

    • The Arts
      May 2018

      Genealogy, Archive, Image

      Interpreting Dynastic History in Western India, c.1090-2016

      by Jayasinhji Jhala

      ‘Genealogy, Archive, Image’ addresses the ways in which history and tradition are ‘reinvented’ through text, memory and painting. It examines the making of dynastic history in the kingdom of Jhalavad, situated in Gujarat, western India, over the longue durée, from the eleventh to twentieth centuries. The essays critique a collection of contemporary miniature paintings, which chart the dynastic history of Jhalavad’s rulers and the textual and ethnographic archive upon which they are based. A multidisciplinary work, it crosses the boundaries of history, anthropology, folklore and mythology, gender, musicology, literary studies, and visual, film and digital media. The essays draw upon a variety of voices, spanning various religious and ethnic communities, including Hindus, Muslims, Jains, Parsees and Siddhi Africans, and caste identities, such as that of the bard, ballad singer, king, priest, court chronicler, soldier, mason and drummer.

    • History of art & design styles: c 1600 to c 1800
      April 2007

      Images of Thought

      Visuality in Islamic India 1550-1750

      by Author(s): Gregory Minissale

      With many illustrations and diagrams, Images of Thought provides easy to follow ways in which to read Indian, Persian and European paintings in terms of composition, proportion, colour symbolism and references to myth. Yet it also provides the intellectual contexts of Islamic cultures which inform our perceptions of how this visual language works. The author uses salient aspects of critical theory, anthropology and theology to sensitise viewers to the diversity and difference of cultural readings but never loses sight of the primacy of the visual and formal characteristics, gestures, geometrical structures and their cooperation with myths and theologemes. The book provides access to one of the world’s major visual traditions whose characteristics continue to inform and elucidate Indian and Islamic contemporary thought today. Images of Thought is a major, scholarly and provocative contribution not only to our understanding of cultural individuality but it offers important examples of how to engage in transcultural understanding and ways of seeing.

    • Sociology
      October 2010

      Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the European Society for Central Asian Studies

      by Editor(s): Tomasz Gacek and Jadwiga Pstrusińska

      This is an important book which will greatly aid readers in their knowledge of Central Asia, one of the crucial regions in the contemporary world. It contains papers reflecting the interdisciplinary quality of recent research carried out in many academic institutions dealing with the region.In this volume, which undertakes the supreme challenge of understanding this vast area of Eurasia, acknowledged experts offer their findings on such important topics as history, archaeology, sociology, anthropology, language, literature, religion, philosophy, civil society and human rights, political science, economics and the environment.This collection undoubtedly constitutes a key gateway to study of the region through the advanced, accurate and scholarly information required by contemporary academia.

    • Art forms
      April 2007

      Art and Life in Melanesia

      by Author(s): Susan Cochrane

      What represents Melanesian art today? Is there modern Melanesian art? Who are the artists? What are the subjects of their art? Art and Life in Melanesia is timely in its exploration of Melanesian artists and their voices, providing an important juncture for many in the region and beyond to take stock of what is happening in Melanesian art.The thirteen chapters are linked essays premised around major cultural themes including Kastom, Christianity, Indigenisation and Globalisation, Markets, Festivals, Diasporas, Urban Culture and Politics. Each theme focuses on ideas, issues and some specific arts practices, drawing examples from a few localities. Not every country is addressed under each theme, an approach that provides the reader with substantive country-specific information. Research for this book was supported by the University of Queensland.

    • Cultural studies
      December 2014

      Aspects of Transnational and Indigenous Cultures

      by Editor(s): Hsinya Huang, Clara Shu-Chun Chang

      Aspects of Transnational and Indigenous Cultures addresses the issues of place and mobility, aesthetics and politics, as well as identity and community, which have emerged in the framework of Global/Transnational American and Indigenous Studies. With its ten chapters – contributions from the U.S., Germany, Australia, Canada, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan – the volume conceptualizes a comparative/trans-national paradigm for crossing over national, regional and international boundaries and, in so doing, to imagine a shared world of poetics and aesthetics in contemporary transnational scholarship.

    • Museums & museology
      January 2015

      China in the Frame

      Materialising Ideas of China in Italian Museums

      by Author(s): Iside Carbone

      Mechanisms of representation of the cultural Other and their connections with processes of self-expression constitute the core of China in the Frame. This original ethnographic study of Chinese-themed displays of artworks in a selection of permanent and temporary exhibitions in Italy highlights specific forms of the materialisation of ideas of cultural identities. The Other represented by these displays is China, the identity of which is nowadays perceived by a wider western public, if not unambiguously, at least more closely, thanks to faster and intensified means of communication and interaction. The representing counterpart is Italy, the identity of which, far from being firmly univocal, is fragmentary and not rigidly set due to the country’s peculiar socio-historical circumstances.The wide range of case studies brought together in this book draw attention to the impact of physical and cultural settings, as well as of various exhibitive criteria and techniques, on different types of manifestations of ideas of China through the medium of museum display. Adopting an underlying theoretical framework whereby representation is a mimetic operation that creatively contributes to the transmission of awareness and knowledge of the Other, the book provides a re-evaluation of the concept of appropriation, emphasising how the recognition of a cultural Other can be instrumental in the determination of certain modes of self-expression. On this basis, the book also elaborates a suggestive definition of Italian Orientalism intended as a phenomenon by which while relating to and trying to represent China, Italy is induced to question and represent its own cultural identity.Through an analysis of fieldwork data, the book identifies and navigates the long and rich history of many of the buildings housing the displays, the different ages of the specimens exhibited and the diversity of topics illustrated, spanning from the artistic and technical achievements of ancient China to the socio-economic changes of contemporary China. As representations are re-affirmed, developed and changed, the variety of materials included in the displays play a relevant part in bringing forth the comprehensive and overarching character of cultural representations in museum contexts.

    • Literature: history & criticism
      November 2017

      Women in Art and Literature Networks

      Spinning Webs

      by Editor(s): Marianne Camus, Valérie Dupont

      This book examines the place of women in art and literature from the 19th century to the present day, whether as artists, critics or collectors. It centers on the concept of the network, as a possible point of entry for women into cultural circles long seen as male territories. Within the framework of feminist history and gender studies, the book looks at the careers of salonnières, gallery owners, editors and all types of artists, in Europe and in the USA. They may be famous (Carolee Schneemann) or less so (Yvonne Serruys), they may or may not have been openly feminist, but they have all used networking as a strategy to defend their artistic choices or their vision of the world, as well as to help and support one another.

    • Biography: religious & spiritual
      January 2014

      Zen-Life

      Ikkyū and Beyond

      by Author(s): Evgeny Steiner

      This book examines Japanese culture of the Muromachi epoch (14–16 centuries) with Ikkyū Sōjun (1394–1481) as its focal point. Ikkyū’s contribution to the culture of his time was all-embracing and unique. He can be called the embodiment of his era, given that all the features typical for the Japanese culture of the High Middle Ages were concentrated in his personality. This multidisciplinary study of Ikkyū’s artistic, religious, and philosophical heritage reconstructs his creative mentality and his way of life. The aesthetics and art of Ikkyū are shown against a broad historical background. Much emphasis is given to Ikkyū’s interpretation of Zen. The book discusses in great detail Ikkyū’s religious and ethical principles, as well as his attitude towards sex, and shows that his rebellious and iconoclastic ways were deeply embedded in the tradition. The book pulls together materials from cultural and religious history with literary and visual artistic texts, and offers a multifaceted view on Ikkyū, as well as on the cultural life of the Muromachi period. This approach ensures that the book will be interesting for art historians, historians of literature and religion, and specialists in cultural and visual studies.

    • Art Styles Not Defined by Date
      October 2013

      Imagining Spaces and Places

      by Editor(s): Saija Isomaa, Pirjo Lyytikäinen, Kirsi Saarikangas, Renja Suominen-Kokkonen

      Imagining Spaces and Places seeks to produce an interdisciplinary dialogue between art history and literature studies and other fields of cultural analysis that work with the concepts of space, place and various “scapes”, such as cityscapes, bodyscapes, mindscapes and memoryscapes, as well as the more familiar landscapes. The volume was inspired by new lines of study that underline the experiential and multidimensional aspects of spaces.We explore how art, literature or urban spaces forge “scapes” by imposing or suggesting aesthetic, evaluative or ideological orderings and perceptual as well as emotive perspectives on the “raw material” or on previous ways of spatial worldmaking. We look at the role of cultural and artistic renderings of space in relation to everyday experiences of spaces. We examine how the experiences of places are mediated in various art forms and other cultural discourses or practices and how these discourses contribute to the understanding of particular places and also to understanding space in more general terms.Imagining Spaces and Places is addressed to scholars and teachers working at the intersection of cultural and spatial analyses, as well as to their undergraduate and postgraduate students.

    • Museums & museology
      November 2007

      Hunting the Collectors

      Pacific Collections in Australian Museums, Art Galleries and Archives

      by Editor(s): Susan Cochrane and Max Quanchi

      This volume investigates Pacific collections held in Australian museums, art galleries and archives, and the diverse group of 19th and 20th century collectors responsible for their acquisition. The nineteen essays reveal varied personal and institutional motivations that eventually led to the conservation, preservation and exhibition in Australia of a remarkable archive of Pacific Island material objects, art and crafts, photographs and documents. Hunting the Collectors benchmarks the importance of Pacific Collections in Australia and is a timely contribution to the worldwide renaissance of interest in Oceanic arts and cultures. The essays suggest that the custodial role is not fixed and immutable but fluctuates with the perceived importance of the collection, which in turn fluctuates with the level of national interest in the Pacific neighbourhood. This cyclical rise and fall of Australian interest in the Pacific Islands means many of the valuable early collections in state and later national repositories and institutions have been rarely exhibited or published. But, as the authors note, enthusiastic museum anthropologists, curators, collection managers and university-based scholars across Australia, and worldwide, have persisted with research on material collected in the Pacific.This volume is a very important one for anyone studying the art and material culture of the Pacific. It focuses on collections now in Australia. Even those well versed in museum collections from the Pacific will learn about many important but little-known collectors as well as better-known figures like the anthropologists F. E. Williams and Thomas Farrell, the husband of Queen Emma. This will be a treat for students and specialist alike.—Professor Robert L. Welsch, University of Dartmouth

    • Colonial Art
      July 2018

      Humoring the Other

      Comedy and the Mitigation of Colonial Discourse

      by Author(s): Mounir Sanhaji

      This book offers an inquiry into the ways in which entertainment discourse extends beyond entertainment and its initial humorous function due to its political and ideological underpinnings. Rather than considering entertainment discourse as “just for fun”, this book justifies the importance of taking it seriously. Humorous features in entertainment discourses can trivialize some stereotypical moments, and, in doing so, encourage viewers to downplay the seriousness of the events they are watching. In other words, these stereotypical images are camouflaged and mitigated by the inclusion of humorous elements and imaginative images, which can lead the audience to perceive them as natural scenes that do not deserve criticism. Embedding banalities within entertainment discourses remains an effective strategy that drives the audience to laugh, meaning that they fail to detect the embedded ideologies regarding different cultures and identities. This confirms the fact that “small talk” can often become “big talk”.

    • Art Styles Not Defined by Date
      November 2013

      De wereld vanuit een luchtballon

      by Robert Verhoogt

      The invention of the hot air balloon in 1783 caused a sensation which would last for more than a century. The great aeronaut Jean-Pierre Blanchard and his fellow pioneers were followed by many others, whose lift-off attracted masses of people again and again. The subsequent “balloon mania” created a new element in cultural history: the third dimension, reflected in the literary and visual arts as well as in high culture and popular imagination. Scenes from a Balloon skilfully endeavours to reconstruct the sensation the balloon caused in cultural history of the late eighteenth and nineteenth century in Europe and the United States. After Thomas Baldwin produced the first image from a balloon in 1785, reproduction of remarkable prints, paintings, and photographs gained widespread popularity. Balloons inspired well-known photographers and artists, including Nadar, Spelterini, Goya, Manet, Daumier, and Redon, but they also led to a wealth of arts & crafts and popular souvenirs. The adventures of Blanchard, Nadar and other balloonists were a source of inspiration for popular writers like Edgar Allan Poe, Jules Verne, and Mark Twain.

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