The politics of everyday China

Description
China's rise from the poverty, isolation and stagnation of the 1970s to the world's second largest economy is a transformative event perhaps unequalled in human history. The world today pays more attention to China, looks to it with more admiration than perhaps any other time. Yet, this rise also hides many deep-rooted problems and competing ideologies. Economically, socially and politically China has transformed itself but there is much that remains uncertain. This book aims to give an insight into China by exploring everyday life for her citizens, in their own voices. Providing both an overview of the political situation and context in China with ethnographic insights, The Politics of Everyday China aims to give both the new student of China and those who have encountered the subject before an insight that goes beyond the usual cliché and surface description.
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Endorsements

The idea that China would transform itself into a liberal democracy, in which the consumer choice that underpins its economic model would be reflected in its politics, increasingly seems like a Western conceit. So how does the Communist Party not only survive but also prosper? Are its citizens cowed by oppression or comfortable with seeming stability and international stature? Indeed, does the politics of everyday life in China offer a more attractive model than the structure fractiousness offered by the West? This book looks at how the contract between the Chinese state and its citizens produces ready compliance and apparent support despite the problems of corruption, food scandals, air pollution and the constraints on personal freedom. It explores the ways in which China's past is presented as both a mandate for political monopoly and a promise of a glorious future. From its multi-ethnic population of hugely varied languages, races and religions to its landscapes of futuristic mega cities and rural poverty, it is a land of hugely diverse people and places. This book aims to explore this rich diversity through the voices of her own people, by exploring the lived experience of a broad range of her citizens from diverse socio-economic, rural, urban ethnic and religious backgrounds. At a key moment in China's history this books aims to tell the story of the transformation of China through the lives of the people who call it home.

Reviews

The idea that China would transform itself into a liberal democracy, in which the consumer choice that underpins its economic model would be reflected in its politics, increasingly seems like a Western conceit. So how does the Communist Party not only survive but also prosper? Are its citizens cowed by oppression or comfortable with seeming stability and international stature? Indeed, does the politics of everyday life in China offer a more attractive model than the structure fractiousness offered by the West? This book looks at how the contract between the Chinese state and its citizens produces ready compliance and apparent support despite the problems of corruption, food scandals, air pollution and the constraints on personal freedom. It explores the ways in which China's past is presented as both a mandate for political monopoly and a promise of a glorious future. From its multi-ethnic population of hugely varied languages, races and religions to its landscapes of futuristic mega cities and rural poverty, it is a land of hugely diverse people and places. This book aims to explore this rich diversity through the voices of her own people, by exploring the lived experience of a broad range of her citizens from diverse socio-economic, rural, urban ethnic and religious backgrounds. At a key moment in China's history this books aims to tell the story of the transformation of China through the lives of the people who call it home.

Author Biography

Neil Collins is Professor of Government at University College Cork;

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Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: July 2018
  • 9781526131805 / 1526131803
  • United Kingdom
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 198 X 129 mm
  • Series: Pocket Politics
  • Reference Code: 10970