The freedom of scientific research

Bridging the gap between science and society

by Simona Giordano, John Harris, Lucio Piccirillo, Rebecca Bennett

Description
Never has the scope and limits of scientific freedom been more important or more under attack. New science, from artificial intelligence to gene editing, creates unique opportunities to make the world a better place and presents unprecedented dangers, which many believe threaten the survival of humanity and the planet. Ironically the very discoveries which promise so much, themselves create new dangers. This book is about the opportunities and challenges, moral, regulatory and existential that now face both science and society. For example, How are scientific developments impacting on human life and on the structure of societies? How is science regulated, and how should it be regulated?Are there ethical boundaries to scientific developments in some sensitive areas? (robotic intelligence, biosecurity?) At stake is both the survival of humankind and the continued existence of our planet.
Rights Information

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Endorsements

Never has the scope and limits of scientific freedom been more important or more under attack. New science, from artificial intelligence to genomic manipulation, creates unique opportunities to make the world a better place and presents unprecedented dangers, which many believe threaten the survival of humanity and the planet. Ironically the very discoveries which promise so much, themselves create new dangers. This book is about the opportunities and challenges, moral, regulatory and existential that now face both science and society. At stake is both the survival of humankind and the continued existence of our planet. This collection by an international and multi-disciplinary group of leading thinkers addresses three vital questions: 1 How are scientific developments impacting on human life and on the structure of societies? 2 How is science regulated, and how should it be regulated? 3 Are there ethical boundaries to scientific developments in some sensitive areas? (robotic intelligence, biosecurity?) The book is written in a lively approachable style which will be accessible to a wide audience, indeed to anyone interested in these vital issues. The authors are drawn from many countries and disciplines, and approach the issues in diverse ways to secure widest representation of the many interests engaged. Authors include some of the most distinguished academics working in this field as well as young scholars. Readership will likely include the life sciences, law, philosophy, social and political science, astro-physics and medicine and will appeal to policy-makers, and the general public alike.

Reviews

Never has the scope and limits of scientific freedom been more important or more under attack. New science, from artificial intelligence to genomic manipulation, creates unique opportunities to make the world a better place and presents unprecedented dangers, which many believe threaten the survival of humanity and the planet. Ironically the very discoveries which promise so much, themselves create new dangers. This book is about the opportunities and challenges, moral, regulatory and existential that now face both science and society. At stake is both the survival of humankind and the continued existence of our planet. This collection by an international and multi-disciplinary group of leading thinkers addresses three vital questions: 1 How are scientific developments impacting on human life and on the structure of societies? 2 How is science regulated, and how should it be regulated? 3 Are there ethical boundaries to scientific developments in some sensitive areas? (robotic intelligence, biosecurity?) The book is written in a lively approachable style which will be accessible to a wide audience, indeed to anyone interested in these vital issues. The authors are drawn from many countries and disciplines, and approach the issues in diverse ways to secure widest representation of the many interests engaged. Authors include some of the most distinguished academics working in this field as well as young scholars. Readership will likely include the life sciences, law, philosophy, social and political science, astro-physics and medicine and will appeal to policy-makers, and the general public alike.

Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: October 2018
  • 9781526127679 / 1526127679
  • United Kingdom
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 234 X 156 mm
  • Series: Contemporary Issues in Bioethics
  • Reference Code: 9458