Royals on tour

Description
Royals on tour explores visits by European monarchs and princes to colonies, and by indigenous royals to Europe in the 1800s and early 1900s with case studies of travel by royals from Britain, France, Portugal, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Japan, the Dutch East Indies and French Indochina. Such tours projected imperial dominion and asserted the status of non-European dynasties. The celebrity of royals, the increased facility of travel, and the interest of public and press made tours key encounters between Europeans and non-Europeans. The reception visitors received illustrate the dynamics of empire and international relations. Ceremonies, speeches and meetings formed part of the popular culture of empire and monarchy. Mixed in with pageantry and protocol were profound questions about the role of monarchs, imperial governance, relationships between metropolitan and overseas elites, and evolving expressions of nationalism.
Rights Information

Afghanistan, Aland Islands, Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antarctica, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bouvet Island, Brazil, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Christmas Island, Cocos [Keeling] Islands, Colombia, Comoros, Congo [DRC], Congo [Republic], Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands [Islas Malvinas], Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guatemala, Guernsey, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Heard Island and McDonald Islands, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Macedonia [FYROM], Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar [Burma], Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, North Korea, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela, Vietnam, Wallis and Futuna, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, Saba, Curaçao, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, French part, Sint Maarten (Dutch Part), South Sudan

Endorsements

Royals on Tour explores visits by European monarchs and other members of royal families to overseas colonies, and by indigenous royals from the colonies to Europe in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. It presents case studies of travel by royals from Britain, France, Portugal, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Belgium to the overseas possessions (and, in some cases, potential possessions) of their countries, and of visits to Europe by royals from Japan, the Dutch East Indies and French Indochina. It shows how these tours served to project imperial dominion but also to assert the status of non-European dynasties. The celebrity of royal figures, the increased ease of travel with new means of transport such as railways, steamships and aeroplanes, and the avid interest of both the public and the press in these visits make such royal tours key points of encounter between Europeans and non-Europeans, and between colonial masters and the subjects in their possessions. The promotion or criticism of tours and the receptions the visitors received illustrate the often fractious dynamics of empire and international relations. The colourful processions, the anthems and decorations, the speeches and itineraries, official meetings and informal activities formed part of the popular culture of empire and of monarchy. The volume argues that mixed in with the pageantry and protocol were profound questions about the role of monarchs, the practice of imperial governance, the relationships between metropolitan and overseas elites, and evolving expressions of nationalism.

Reviews

Royals on Tour explores visits by European monarchs and other members of royal families to overseas colonies, and by indigenous royals from the colonies to Europe in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. It presents case studies of travel by royals from Britain, France, Portugal, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Belgium to the overseas possessions (and, in some cases, potential possessions) of their countries, and of visits to Europe by royals from Japan, the Dutch East Indies and French Indochina. It shows how these tours served to project imperial dominion but also to assert the status of non-European dynasties. The celebrity of royal figures, the increased ease of travel with new means of transport such as railways, steamships and aeroplanes, and the avid interest of both the public and the press in these visits make such royal tours key points of encounter between Europeans and non-Europeans, and between colonial masters and the subjects in their possessions. The promotion or criticism of tours and the receptions the visitors received illustrate the often fractious dynamics of empire and international relations. The colourful processions, the anthems and decorations, the speeches and itineraries, official meetings and informal activities formed part of the popular culture of empire and of monarchy. The volume argues that mixed in with the pageantry and protocol were profound questions about the role of monarchs, the practice of imperial governance, the relationships between metropolitan and overseas elites, and evolving expressions of nationalism.

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Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: May 2018
  • 9781526109378 / 1526109379
  • United Kingdom
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: General/trade
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 234 X 156 mm
  • Series: Studies in Imperialism
  • Reference Code: 7919