Reformation without end

Religion, politics and the past in post-revolutionary England

by Jason Peacey, Robert Ingram

Description
Reformation without end radically reinterprets the English Reformation. No one in eighteenth-century England thought that they lived during 'the Enlightenment'. Instead, they thought that they still faced the religious, intellectual and political problems unleashed by the Reformation, which began in the sixteenth century. They faced those problems, though, in the aftermath of two bloody seventeenth-century political and religious revolutions. This book is about the ways that the eighteenth-century English debated the causes and consequences of those seventeenth-century revolutions and the thing which they thought had caused them, the Reformation. Reformation without end draws on a wide array of manuscript sources to show how authors crafted and pitched their works.
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Endorsements

Reformation without end offers an entirely new interpretation of the English Reformation. No one in eighteenth-century England thought that they lived during 'the Enlightenment'. Instead, they thought that they still faced the religious, intellectual and political problems unleashed by the Reformation, which began in the sixteenth century. They faced those problems, though, in the aftermath of two bloody seventeenth-century political and religious revolutions. This book is about the ways the eighteenth-century English debated the causes and consequences of those seventeenth-century revolutions. Those living in post-revolutionary England conceived themselves as living in the midst of the very thing which they thought had caused the revolutions: the Reformation. The reasons for and the legacy of the Reformation remained hotly debated in post-revolutionary England because the religious and political issues it had generated remained unresolved and that irresolution threatened more civil unrest. For this reason, most that got published during the eighteenth century concerned religion. This book looks closely at the careers of four of the eighteenth century's most important polemical divines, Daniel Waterland, Conyers Middleton, Zachary Grey and William Warburton. It relies on a wide range of manuscript sources, including annotated books and unpublished drafts, to show how eighteenth-century authors crafted and pitched their works. Reformation without end will be required reading for students and scholars of early modern English religious, intellectual and political history.

Reviews

Reformation without end offers an entirely new interpretation of the English Reformation. No one in eighteenth-century England thought that they lived during 'the Enlightenment'. Instead, they thought that they still faced the religious, intellectual and political problems unleashed by the Reformation, which began in the sixteenth century. They faced those problems, though, in the aftermath of two bloody seventeenth-century political and religious revolutions. This book is about the ways the eighteenth-century English debated the causes and consequences of those seventeenth-century revolutions. Those living in post-revolutionary England conceived themselves as living in the midst of the very thing which they thought had caused the revolutions: the Reformation. The reasons for and the legacy of the Reformation remained hotly debated in post-revolutionary England because the religious and political issues it had generated remained unresolved and that irresolution threatened more civil unrest. For this reason, most that got published during the eighteenth century concerned religion. This book looks closely at the careers of four of the eighteenth century's most important polemical divines, Daniel Waterland, Conyers Middleton, Zachary Grey and William Warburton. It relies on a wide range of manuscript sources, including annotated books and unpublished drafts, to show how eighteenth-century authors crafted and pitched their works. Reformation without end will be required reading for students and scholars of early modern English religious, intellectual and political history.

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Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: March 2018
  • 9781526126962 / 1526126966
  • United Kingdom
  • ePub
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: General/trade
  • Publish State: Published
  • Series: Politics, Culture and Society in Early Modern Britain
  • Reference Code: 10676