Human Rights and the Borders of Suffering

The Promotion of Human Rights in International Politics

by Anne Brown, M. Anne Brown, Peter Lawler, Emmanuel Pierre Guittet

Description
This study of human rights argues for a greater openness in the ways we approach human rights and international rights promotion. Starting with the realities of abuse rather than the liberal architectures of rights, it casts human rights as a language for probing the political dimensions of suffering, and shows Western rights models as substantial but problematic. Brown shows that rather than a message from "us" to "them", rights promotion is a long and difficult conversation about the relationship between political organisation and suffering. Three case studies are explored - the Tiananmen Square massacre, East Timor and the circumstances of indigenous Australians.
Rights Information

Afghanistan, Aland Islands, Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antarctica, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bouvet Island, Brazil, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Christmas Island, Cocos [Keeling] Islands, Colombia, Comoros, Congo [DRC], Congo [Republic], Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands [Islas Malvinas], Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guatemala, Guernsey, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Heard Island and McDonald Islands, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, China, Macedonia [FYROM], Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar [Burma], Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, North Korea, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, China, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela, Vietnam, Wallis and Futuna, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, Saba, Curaçao, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, French part, Sint Maarten (Dutch Part), South Sudan

Endorsements

This study of human rights argues for a greater openness in the ways we approach human rights and international rights promotion. Starting with the realities of abuse rather than the liberal architectures of rights, it casts human rights as a language for probing the political dimensions of suffering, and shows Western rights models as substantial but problematic. Brown shows that rather than a message from "us" to "them", rights promotion is a long and difficult conversation about the relationship between political organisation and suffering. Three case studies are explored - the Tiananmen Square massacre, East Timor and the circumstances of indigenous Australians.

Reviews

This study of human rights argues for a greater openness in the ways we approach human rights and international rights promotion. Starting with the realities of abuse rather than the liberal architectures of rights, it casts human rights as a language for probing the political dimensions of suffering, and shows Western rights models as substantial but problematic. Brown shows that rather than a message from "us" to "them", rights promotion is a long and difficult conversation about the relationship between political organisation and suffering. Three case studies are explored - the Tiananmen Square massacre, East Timor and the circumstances of indigenous Australians.

Author Biography

Anne Brown is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Queensland where she is part of an interdisciplinary team working on emerging issues in conflict resolution; ;

Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: August 2002
  • English
  • 9780719061059 / 0719061059
  • United Kingdom
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 234 X 156 mm
  • Series: New Approaches to Conflict Analysis
  • Reference Code: 1779