Curatopia

Museums and the future of curatorship

by Philipp Schorch, Conal McCarthy

Description
What is the future of curatorship? Is there a vision for an ideal model, a curatopia, whether in the form of a utopia or dystopia? Or is there a plurality of approaches, amounting to a curatorial heterotopia? This pioneering volume addresses these questions by considering the current state of curatorship. It reviews the different models and approaches operating in museums, galleries and cultural organisations around the world and discusses emerging concerns, challenges and opportunities. The collection explores the ways in which the mutual, asymmetrical relations underpinning global, scientific entanglements of the past can be transformed into more reciprocal, symmetrical forms of cross-cultural curatorship in the present, arguing that this is the most effective way for curatorial practice to remain meaningful. International in scope, the volume covers three regions: Europe, North America and the Pacific.
Rights Information

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Endorsements

What is the future of curatorship? Is there a vision for an ideal model, a Curatopia, whether in the form of a utopia or dystopia? Or is there a plurality of approaches, amounting to a curatorial heterotopia? How can we historicise, theorise and ethnographically analyse museums as profoundly cross-cultural spaces and study curatorship as an inherently cross-cultural method that requires dialogical translation and interpretive reciprocity? How can the relationships between Indigenous people in North America and the Pacific, collections in Euro-American institutions and curatorial knowledge in museums globally be (re)conceptualised? This volume addresses these questions through the 'the figure of the curator'. It considers the current state of curatorship, reviewing the different models operating in various museums, galleries and cultural organisations around the world and discussing emerging concerns, challenges and opportunities. The collection explores the ways in which the mutual, asymmetrical relations underpinning global, scientific entanglements of the past can be transformed into more reciprocal, symmetrical forms of cross-cultural curatorship in the present, arguing that this is the most effective way for curatorial practice to remain meaningful. The volume is international in scope and covers three broad regions: Europe, North America and the Pacific. The contributors are leading and emerging scholars and practitioners in their respective fields. Furthermore, all contributors have worked in and with universities and museums, often in curatorial roles, and are therefore well positioned to enrich the dialogue between academia and the professional museum world.

Reviews

What is the future of curatorship? Is there a vision for an ideal model, a Curatopia, whether in the form of a utopia or dystopia? Or is there a plurality of approaches, amounting to a curatorial heterotopia? How can we historicise, theorise and ethnographically analyse museums as profoundly cross-cultural spaces and study curatorship as an inherently cross-cultural method that requires dialogical translation and interpretive reciprocity? How can the relationships between Indigenous people in North America and the Pacific, collections in Euro-American institutions and curatorial knowledge in museums globally be (re)conceptualised? This volume addresses these questions through the 'the figure of the curator'. It considers the current state of curatorship, reviewing the different models operating in various museums, galleries and cultural organisations around the world and discussing emerging concerns, challenges and opportunities. The collection explores the ways in which the mutual, asymmetrical relations underpinning global, scientific entanglements of the past can be transformed into more reciprocal, symmetrical forms of cross-cultural curatorship in the present, arguing that this is the most effective way for curatorial practice to remain meaningful. The volume is international in scope and covers three broad regions: Europe, North America and the Pacific. The contributors are leading and emerging scholars and practitioners in their respective fields. Furthermore, all contributors have worked in and with universities and museums, often in curatorial roles, and are therefore well positioned to enrich the dialogue between academia and the professional museum world.

Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: December 2018
  • 9781526118196 / 152611819X
  • United Kingdom
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: General/trade; College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 234 X 156 mm
  • Reference Code: 9452