The Germans in India

Elite European migrants in the British Empire

by Panikos Panayi, Andrew Thompson

Description
Based upon years of research in libraries and archives in England, Germany, India and Switzerland, this book offers a new interpretation of global migration from the early nineteenth until the early twentieth century. Rather than focusing upon the mass transatlantic migration or the movement of Britons towards British colonies, it examines the elite German migrants who progressed to India, especially missionaries, scholars and scientists, businessmen and travellers. The story told here questions, for the first time, the concept of Europeans in India. Previous scholarship has ignored any national variations in the presence of white people in India, viewing them either as part of a ruling elite or, more recently, white subalterns. The German elites undermine these conceptions. They developed into distinct groups before 1914, especially in the missionary compound, but faced marginalisation and expulsion during the First World War.
Rights Information

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Endorsements

Based upon years of research in libraries and archives in England, Germany, India and Switzerland, this book offers a new interpretation of global migration from the early nineteenth until the early twentieth century. Rather than focusing upon the mass transatlantic migration or the movement of Britons towards British colonies, it examines the elite German migrants who made their way to India, especially missionaries, scholars and scientists, businessmen and travelers. The volume outlines the reasons for migration, in which networks played a central role, then moves on to examine the everyday lives of Germans in India. It tackles the concept of German community and outlines the interaction between Germans, Britons and Indians, which the First World War completely transformed. The history of the Germans in India needs contextualization against the background of nineteenth century globalization as a result of imperialism and the internationalization of German migrant identities. The story told here questions, for the first time, the concept of Europeans in India. Previous scholarship has tended to ignore any national variations in the presence of white people in India, viewing them either as part of a ruling elite or, more recently, white subalterns. The German elites undermine these conceptions. Developing into a distinct group before 1914, especially in the missionary compounds, the Government of India marginalised and expelled them during the First World War, when for the first time, many of them realised they had a distinct German national identity.

Reviews

Based upon years of research in libraries and archives in England, Germany, India and Switzerland, this book offers a new interpretation of global migration from the early nineteenth until the early twentieth century. Rather than focusing upon the mass transatlantic migration or the movement of Britons towards British colonies, it examines the elite German migrants who made their way to India, especially missionaries, scholars and scientists, businessmen and travelers. The volume outlines the reasons for migration, in which networks played a central role, then moves on to examine the everyday lives of Germans in India. It tackles the concept of German community and outlines the interaction between Germans, Britons and Indians, which the First World War completely transformed. The history of the Germans in India needs contextualization against the background of nineteenth century globalization as a result of imperialism and the internationalization of German migrant identities. The story told here questions, for the first time, the concept of Europeans in India. Previous scholarship has tended to ignore any national variations in the presence of white people in India, viewing them either as part of a ruling elite or, more recently, white subalterns. The German elites undermine these conceptions. Developing into a distinct group before 1914, especially in the missionary compounds, the Government of India marginalised and expelled them during the First World War, when for the first time, many of them realised they had a distinct German national identity.

Author Biography

Panikos Panayi is Reader in History at De Montfort University;

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Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: October 2017
  • 9781526119353 / 1526119358
  • United Kingdom
  • ePub
  • Primary Price: 96 GBP
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: General/trade; College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Series: Studies in Imperialism
  • Reference Code: 9629