Egypt

British colony, imperial capital

by James Whidden, Andrew Thompson

Description
This book is a comprehensive portrait of the British colony in Egypt, which also takes a fresh look at the examples of colonial cultures memorably enshrined in Edward W. Said's classic Orientalism. Arguing that Said's analysis offered only the dominant discourse in imperial and colonial narratives, it uses private papers, letters, memoirs, as well as the official texts, histories and government reports, to reveal both dominant and muted discourses. While imperial sentiment certainly set the standards and sealed the image of a ruling caste culture, the investigation of colonial sentiment reveals a more diverse colony in temperament and lifestyles, often intimately rooted in the Egyptian setting. The method involves providing biographical treatments of a wide range of colonials and the sometimes contradictory responses to specific colonial locations, historical junctures and seminal events, like invasion and war or grand imperial projects including the Alexandria municipality.
Rights Information

Afghanistan, Aland Islands, Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antarctica, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bouvet Island, Brazil, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Christmas Island, Cocos [Keeling] Islands, Colombia, Comoros, Congo [DRC], Congo [Republic], Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands [Islas Malvinas], Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guatemala, Guernsey, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Heard Island and McDonald Islands, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Macedonia [FYROM], Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar [Burma], Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, North Korea, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela, Vietnam, Wallis and Futuna, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, Saba, Curaçao, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, French part, Sint Maarten (Dutch Part), South Sudan

Endorsements

This book is an account of the British experience in Egypt over two centuries, informed by the testimonies of a diverse set of individuals. Providing life stories alongside institutional portraits, it offers multiple perspectives on colonial and imperial cultures, from five generations of a British, Alexandrian family to a Reuters correspondent with the ear of ambassadors, generals and pashas. By relating the British colony to discourses on civilising missions, race and nation, law and order, religion, governance and war, the book identifies the contradictory attitudes of consuls and bishops, artists and soldiers, mothers and daughters, patricians and clients, long-term and short-term colonials. A biographical treatment of the colony discloses problems of historical memory, identifying divergences based on location, time period and profession. Official narratives sometimes bore little resemblance to private recollections, indicating that the imperial 'project' was not uniform or even coherent. Nevertheless, certain salient features emerge, among them that the colony in its initial phase was more Levantine than imperial, and that it was recollected as having its 'golden age' between the military occupation of 1882 and the end of the First World War, with the ensuing years being marked by conflicting visions of a threatened colonial future. These themes engage with recent imperial historiography, but are applied to a setting that is often overlooked, in spite of the prominent treatment of Egypt in Edward Said's ground-breaking Orientalism. Egypt was an integral site in the imperial network and this book will be of great interest to area specialists working in political, historical or cultural studies.

Reviews

This book is an account of the British experience in Egypt over two centuries, informed by the testimonies of a diverse set of individuals. Providing life stories alongside institutional portraits, it offers multiple perspectives on colonial and imperial cultures, from five generations of a British, Alexandrian family to a Reuters correspondent with the ear of ambassadors, generals and pashas. By relating the British colony to discourses on civilising missions, race and nation, law and order, religion, governance and war, the book identifies the contradictory attitudes of consuls and bishops, artists and soldiers, mothers and daughters, patricians and clients, long-term and short-term colonials. A biographical treatment of the colony discloses problems of historical memory, identifying divergences based on location, time period and profession. Official narratives sometimes bore little resemblance to private recollections, indicating that the imperial 'project' was not uniform or even coherent. Nevertheless, certain salient features emerge, among them that the colony in its initial phase was more Levantine than imperial, and that it was recollected as having its 'golden age' between the military occupation of 1882 and the end of the First World War, with the ensuing years being marked by conflicting visions of a threatened colonial future. These themes engage with recent imperial historiography, but are applied to a setting that is often overlooked, in spite of the prominent treatment of Egypt in Edward Said's ground-breaking Orientalism. Egypt was an integral site in the imperial network and this book will be of great interest to area specialists working in political, historical or cultural studies.

Thank you for proceeding with this offer.

Manchester University Press has chosen to review this offer before it proceeds.

You will receive an email update that will bring you back to complete the process.

You can also check the status in the My Offers area
Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: June 2017
  • 9781526105974 / 1526105977
  • United Kingdom
  • Primary Price: 110 USD
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: General/trade
  • Publish State: Published
  • Series: Studies in Imperialism
  • Reference Code: 7868